Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Hemodialysis Frequency and Duration on Blood Pressure Management and Quality of Life in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Nurse Perceptions of Artists as Collaborators in Interprofessional Care Teams
Previous Article in Special Issue
Telemedicine, Telehealth and m-Health: New Frontiers in Medical Practice
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessCase Report
Healthcare 2017, 5(3), 51; doi:10.3390/healthcare5030051

Telemonitoring via Self-Report and Video Review in Community Palliative Care: A Case Report

1
Palliative and Supportive Services, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide 5001, Australia
2
Southern Adelaide Palliative Services, Daw Park, Adelaide 5041, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ronald S. Weinstein and Elizabeth A. Krupinski
Received: 11 July 2017 / Revised: 9 August 2017 / Accepted: 24 August 2017 / Published: 31 August 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [196 KB, uploaded 1 September 2017]

Abstract

Continuous monitoring and management of a person’s symptoms and performance status are critical for the delivery of effective palliative care. This monitoring occurs routinely in inpatient settings; however, such close evaluation in the community has remained elusive. Patient self-reporting using telehealth offers opportunities to identify symptom escalation and functional decline in real time, and facilitate timely proactive management. We report the case of a 57­year-old man with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who participated in a telehealth trial run by a community palliative care service. This gentleman was able to complete self-reporting of function and symptoms via iPad although at times he was reticent to do so. Self-reporting was perceived as a means to communicate his clinical needs without being a bother to the community palliative care team. He also participated in a videoconference with clinical staff from the community palliative care service and his General Practitioner. Videoconferencing with the nurse and GP was highly valued as an effective way to communicate and also because it eliminated the need for travel. This case report provides important information about the feasibility and acceptability of palliative care telehealth as a way to better manage clinical care in a community setting. View Full-Text
Keywords: telemonitoring; palliative care; video-conference; community; cancer telemonitoring; palliative care; video-conference; community; cancer
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Morgan, D.D.; Swetenham, K.; To, T.H.M.; Currow, D.C.; Tieman, J.J. Telemonitoring via Self-Report and Video Review in Community Palliative Care: A Case Report. Healthcare 2017, 5, 51.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Healthcare EISSN 2227-9032 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top