Special Issue "Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. James Schmitt

Department of Earth Sciences, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173480, Bozeman, MT 59717-3480, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: relations between deformation and sedimentation; sedimentary basin development; controls on sediment provenance; siliciclastic diagenesis; depositional systems; geoscience education; taphonomy and fossil preservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The major objective of this special issue of Geosciences is to examine the dynamically linked relations between sedimentary basin and orogenic belt development. Because sedimentary basins serve as the repositories of detritus delivered from deforming and eroding orogens, they record the geodynamic signature of mountain belt development.  This sediment source (orogen) to sink (basin) relationship results in a wide spectrum of attributes typically recorded in basin-fill including:  (1) tectonic style of lithosphere/crust deformation during orogensis, (2) sedimentary and geomorphic responses to land surface deformation, (3) controls on sediment provenance and dispersal, (4) development of paleotopography, (5) rates and mechanisms of mountain belt uplift and exhumation, (6) distribution and evolution of depositional systems, (7) paleoenvironments and climate and (8) biogeographic parameters.

Specifically, this special issue aims to provide an outlet for rapid, widely accessible publication of peer-reviewed studies utilizing the synorogenic sedimentary basin record to improve understanding of orogenesis in associated mountain belts using both modern and ancient examples from all types of tectonic settings.  Research spanning the spectrum of methods ranging from use of more traditional field-based stratigraphic analysis and structural mapping to geochemical and isotopic provenance/subsidence history analysis to basin/orogen modeling approaches is welcome

Prof. Dr. James Schmitt
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • synorogenic sedimentation
  • orogenesis
  • provenance studies
  • sediment dispersal
  • uplift and exhumation
  • orogens and climate
  • subsidence histories and mechanisms
  • basin tectonics
  • tectonic geomorphology

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Detrital Zircon Fission-Track Thermochronology of the Present-Day Isère River Drainage System in the Western Alps: No Evidence for Increasing Erosion Rates at 5 Ma
Geosciences 2013, 3(3), 528-542; doi:10.3390/geosciences3030528
Received: 7 May 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 23 July 2013 / Published: 6 August 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Isère River system drains parts of the Western Alps in south-eastern France. Zircon fission-track data of the Isère River and its tributaries show a range of apparent cooling ages from about 7 to 150 Ma. Zircons with Jurassic to early Tertiary cooling
[...] Read more.
The Isère River system drains parts of the Western Alps in south-eastern France. Zircon fission-track data of the Isère River and its tributaries show a range of apparent cooling ages from about 7 to 150 Ma. Zircons with Jurassic to early Tertiary cooling ages are derived from partially reset or non-reset sedimentary cover units of the internal and external Alps, while grains belonging to the minimum age fraction are derived from areas of active river incision in the external crystalline massifs or from the Penninic front. With the absence of major normal faults, upper crustal exhumation in the Western Alps is driven by erosion. First-order long-term exhumation rate estimates based on minimum ages are about 0.5–0.6 km/Myr for the fastest exhuming areas, while drainage basin average rates based on central ages are about 0.2–0.4 km/Myr. These rates are slower than published short-term erosion rates determined from detrital quartz 10Be analyses in the Pelvoux massif. While present-day erosion is faster than the long-term average exhumation rates, the Isère River drainage zircon fission-track data do not show evidence for increasing erosion rates at 5 Ma. Exhumation has not been sufficient in this area to expose rocks with <5 Ma cooling ages today. The increase in erosion may have happened only in glaciated areas between 1 and 2 Ma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Open AccessArticle Lower Paleogene Tectonostratigraphy of Balochistan: Evidence for Time-Transgressive Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Uplift
Geosciences 2013, 3(3), 466-501; doi:10.3390/geosciences3030466
Received: 1 June 2013 / Revised: 19 July 2013 / Accepted: 19 July 2013 / Published: 29 July 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4004 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Analysis of lithofacies, paleoflow directions, and sandstone petrography of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene paralic and continental sediments exposed along the transpressional suture zone of the western margin of the Indian plate indicate that the process of deformation and uplift of the carbonate shelf in
[...] Read more.
Analysis of lithofacies, paleoflow directions, and sandstone petrography of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene paralic and continental sediments exposed along the transpressional suture zone of the western margin of the Indian plate indicate that the process of deformation and uplift of the carbonate shelf in this area had started by late Paleocene time. This tectonic uplift and deformation is documented by: (1) an overall shallowing upward synorogenic sequence of sediments, (2) proximal conglomerate facies (consisting of lower Paleocene and Mesozoic clasts) dominating in the western part of the study area and distal facies of sandstone and shale dominating in the eastern part of the study area, (3) the existence of an unconformity of late Paleocene-early Eocene age in the Quetta and Kalat regions, (4) paleocurrent directions in deltaic and fluvial deposits indicating southeastward flowing sediment dispersal paths during late Paleocene-early Eocene time, which is opposite to that found in the late Cretaceous, suggesting a reversal in the depositional slope of the Cretaceous shelf, and (5) petrographic study of sandstones indicating a collision suture/fold thrust belt provenance. This episode of uplift and deformation could be the result of India-Arabian transpression with associated ophiolite obduction or, more likely, to represent the local response to initial India-Asia contact. The unroofing pattern and uplift geometry of the western Indian shelf suggests that this tectonism first started in the southern part of the study area (Kalat-Khuzdar area) during the late Paleocene-early Eocene and proceeded northward in a time-transgressive fashion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Open AccessArticle Provenance of Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic Sandstones, Taimyr Peninsula, the Arctic
Geosciences 2013, 3(3), 502-527; doi:10.3390/geosciences3030502
Received: 4 May 2013 / Revised: 11 July 2013 / Accepted: 15 July 2013 / Published: 29 July 2013
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (3374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The sedimentary and provenance characteristics of seven Permo-Carboniferous and two early Cretaceous samples from the Taimyr Peninsula provide information about the latest evolution of Uralian orogeny and the opening of the Amerasian Basin. The Permo-Carboniferous samples have a mixed provenance of recycled and
[...] Read more.
The sedimentary and provenance characteristics of seven Permo-Carboniferous and two early Cretaceous samples from the Taimyr Peninsula provide information about the latest evolution of Uralian orogeny and the opening of the Amerasian Basin. The Permo-Carboniferous samples have a mixed provenance of recycled and first cycle sediment, sourced from metamorphic and igneous terranes. U-Pb detrital zircon ages represent a mixture of Precambrian-Paleozoic grains with euhedral, penecontemporaneous late Carboniferous and Permian grains consistent with derivation from the Uralian Orogen, plus additional Timanian and Caledonian material presumably derived from Baltica. Differences between the late Permian sample and the other Carboniferous and early Permian samples are interpreted to reflect the final collisional stage of Uralian orogeny. Early Cretaceous sediments deposited at the time of the Amerasian Basin opening preserve a mixed provenance of mainly first cycle metamorphic and igneous source material, as well as an unstable heavy mineral assemblage dominated by staurolite, suggesting local derivation. Detrital zircon ages fall almost exclusively into one late Permian-early Triassic cluster, indicating a Siberia Trap-related magmatic source. The detrital zircon age spectra support a passive margin setting for Taimyr during the opening of the Amerasian Basin in the early Cretaceous. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Open AccessArticle Geodynamic Reconstructions of the Australides—1: Palaeozoic
Geosciences 2013, 3(2), 311-330; doi:10.3390/geosciences3020311
Received: 23 March 2013 / Revised: 29 April 2013 / Accepted: 13 May 2013 / Published: 4 June 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (27194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A full global geodynamical reconstruction model has been developed at the University of Lausanne over the past 20 years, and is used herein to re-appraise the evolution of the Australides from 600 to 200 Ma. Geological information of geodynamical interest associated with constraints
[...] Read more.
A full global geodynamical reconstruction model has been developed at the University of Lausanne over the past 20 years, and is used herein to re-appraise the evolution of the Australides from 600 to 200 Ma. Geological information of geodynamical interest associated with constraints on tectonic plate driving forces allow us to propose a consistent scenario for the evolution of Australia–Antarctica–proto-Pacific system. According to our model, most geodynamic units (GDUs) of the Australides are exotic in origin, and many tectonic events of the Delamerian Cycle, Lachlan SuperCycle, and New England SuperCycle are regarded as occurring off-shore Gondwana. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Open AccessArticle Geodynamic Reconstructions of the Australides—2: Mesozoic–Cainozoic
Geosciences 2013, 3(2), 331-353; doi:10.3390/geosciences3020331
Received: 23 March 2013 / Revised: 29 April 2013 / Accepted: 13 May 2013 / Published: 4 June 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (19063 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present work, derived from a full global geodynamic reconstruction model over 600 Ma and based on a large database, focuses herein on the interaction between the Pacific, Australian and Antarctic plates since 200 Ma, and proposes integrated solutions for a coherent, physically
[...] Read more.
The present work, derived from a full global geodynamic reconstruction model over 600 Ma and based on a large database, focuses herein on the interaction between the Pacific, Australian and Antarctic plates since 200 Ma, and proposes integrated solutions for a coherent, physically consistent scenario. The evolution of the Australia–Antarctica–West Pacific plate system is dependent on the Gondwana fit chosen for the reconstruction. Our fit, as defined for the latest Triassic, implies an original scenario for the evolution of the region, in particular for the “early” opening history of the Tasman Sea. The interaction with the Pacific, moreover, is characterised by many magmatic arc migrations and ocean openings, which are stopped by arc–arc collision, arc–spreading axis collision, or arc–oceanic plateau collision, and subduction reversals. Mid-Pacific oceanic plateaus created in the model are much wider than they are on present-day maps, and although they were subducted to a large extent, they were able to stop subduction. We also suggest that adduction processes (i.e., re-emergence of subducted material) may have played an important role, in particular along the plate limit now represented by the Alpine Fault in New Zealand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Open AccessArticle The Role of Regional and Local Structure in a Late Ordovician (Edenian) Foreland Platform-to-Basin Succession Inboard of the Taconic Orogen, Central Canada
Geosciences 2013, 3(2), 216-239; doi:10.3390/geosciences3020216
Received: 15 March 2013 / Revised: 26 April 2013 / Accepted: 9 May 2013 / Published: 21 May 2013
PDF Full-text (8219 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Upper Ordovician (Edenian) Lindsay Formation of the Ottawa Embayment represents the final stage of carbonate platform development in the Taconic foreland periphery inboard of the northern Appalachian orogen. The succession overlies a narrow (~60 km) axis of a Neoproterozoic Laurentian rift extending
[...] Read more.
The Upper Ordovician (Edenian) Lindsay Formation of the Ottawa Embayment represents the final stage of carbonate platform development in the Taconic foreland periphery inboard of the northern Appalachian orogen. The succession overlies a narrow (~60 km) axis of a Neoproterozoic Laurentian rift extending across the Grenville orogen. The Lindsay Formation consists of a lower heavily bioturbated skeletal limestone that represents a warm-water shoal facies following an underlying outer ramp stratigraphy, and an upper division of renewed deep-water deposition with organic-rich shale and fossiliferous lime mudstone. Pyritic deep-water black shale of the westerly advancing Taconic foreland basin disconformably overlies this platform succession. Stratigraphic correlation through the central embayment identifies likely synsedimentary faults and seaward-directed erosion bounding the Lindsay Formation in a region of older Ordovician faults and a change in the lithotectonic character of the crystalline basement. The Late Ordovician shallowing and localization of structural/erosional features are interpreted to record a structural hinge: a local accommodation to, first, foreland periphery uplift, then rapid subsidence related to westerly diachronous foreland subsidence through the platform interior. Spatial association of structures of differing ages suggests that reactivation of inherited weakened crust influenced Late Ordovician sedimentary patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Volcanosedimentary Basins in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: Markers of Repeated Exhumation and Denudation in a Neoproterozoic Accretionary Orogen
Geosciences 2013, 3(3), 389-445; doi:10.3390/geosciences3030389
Received: 7 May 2013 / Revised: 17 June 2013 / Accepted: 19 June 2013 / Published: 9 July 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (26910 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) includes Middle Cryogenian-Ediacaran (790–560 Ma) sedimentary and volcanic terrestrial and shallow-marine successions unconformable on juvenile Cryogenian crust. The oldest were deposited after 780–760 Ma shearing and suturing in the central ANS. Middle Cryogenian basins are associated with ~700 Ma
[...] Read more.
The Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) includes Middle Cryogenian-Ediacaran (790–560 Ma) sedimentary and volcanic terrestrial and shallow-marine successions unconformable on juvenile Cryogenian crust. The oldest were deposited after 780–760 Ma shearing and suturing in the central ANS. Middle Cryogenian basins are associated with ~700 Ma suturing in the northern ANS. Late Cryogenian basins overlapped with and followed 680–640 Ma Nabitah orogenesis in the eastern ANS. Ediacaran successions are found in pull-apart and other types of basins formed in a transpressive setting associated with E-W shortening, NW-trending shearing, and northerly extension during final amalgamation of the ANS. Erosion surfaces truncating metamorphosed arc rocks at the base of these successions are evidence of periodic exhumation and erosion of the evolving ANS crust. The basins are evidence of subsequent subsidence to the base level of alluvial systems or below sea level. Mountains were dissected by valley systems, yet relief was locally low enough to allow for seaways connected to the surrounding Mozambique Ocean. The volcanosedimentary basins of the ANS are excellently exposed and preserved, and form a world-class natural laboratory for testing concepts about crustal growth during the Neoproterozoic and for the acquisition of data to calibrate chemical and isotopic changes, at a time in geologic history that included some of the most important, rapid, and enigmatic changes to Earth’s environment and biota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Geosciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
geosciences@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Geosciences
Back to Top