Special Issue "Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Salvatore Carta

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: human-computer interaction; persuasive computing; recommender systems; social networks
Guest Editor
Dr. Ludovico Boratto

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: recommender systems; data mining; social networks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the recent years, both Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) and the Social Web (also known as Web 2.0) have had exponential growth.
In [1], Human–Computer Interaction is defined as “a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them”. On the other hand, [2] defines the Social Web as “a set of relationships that link together people over the Web... The Social Web is not just about relationships, but about the applications and innovations that can be built on top of these relationships”.
As the two definitions quoted above suggest, the two disciplines can work well together. In fact, a HCI application could be developed in the Social Web scenario, in order to study and improve relationships among people. Moreover, Turekten and Olfman highlighted that the ‘any time, any place’ nature of HCI has not been widely explored in the Web 2.0 research area [3]. Recently, approaches to link these two disciplines have been developed [4].
The aim of this special issue is to invite authors to submit original manuscripts that explore (and possibly cover) this gap between HCI and the Social Web. This Special Issue solicits novel papers on a broad range of topics, including, but not limited to: novel HCI applications able to interact with the social web, integration of social web features into existing HCI applications, social networks analysis of data gathered through HCI applications, and analysis of how the introduction of social web features has an impact on the performance of HCI applications.


[1] ACM SIGCHI. (1992) Acm sigchi curricula for human–computer inter-action. New York, NY, USA.
[2] D. Appelquist, D. Brickley, M. Carvahlo, R. Iannella, A. Pas-sant, C. Perey, and H. Story. (2010) A Standards-based, Open and Privacy-aware Social Web. W3C Incubator Group Report.
[3] O. Turetken and L. Olfman, “Introduction to the special issue on human–computer interaction in the web 2.0 era,” AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, vol. 5, no. 1, 2013.
[4] F. Mulas, P. Pilloni, M. Manca, L. Boratto, and S. Carta, "Linking Human–Computer Interaction with the Social Web: A web application to improve motivation in the exercising activity of users," In Cognitive Infocommunications (CogInfoCom), 2013 IEEE 4th International Conference on (pp. 351-356). IEEE.

Prof. Dr. Salvatore Carta
Dr. Ludovico Boratto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human–computer interaction
  • social web
  • social network analysis
  • social media
  • persuasive applications
  • ubiquitous computing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Introduction to the Special Issue on Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web
Future Internet 2016, 8(3), 43; doi:10.3390/fi8030043
Received: 22 August 2016 / Accepted: 25 August 2016 / Published: 1 September 2016
PDF Full-text (152 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, both Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and the Social Web (also known as Web 2.0) have had exponential growth.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Digital Libraries: The Challenge of Integrating Instagram with a Taxonomy for Content Management
Future Internet 2016, 8(2), 16; doi:10.3390/fi8020016
Received: 29 February 2016 / Revised: 20 April 2016 / Accepted: 25 April 2016 / Published: 10 May 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (648 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Interoperability and social implication are two current challenges in the digital library (DL) context. To resolve the problem of interoperability, our work aims to find a relationship between the main metadata schemas. In particular, we want to formalize knowledge through the creation of
[...] Read more.
Interoperability and social implication are two current challenges in the digital library (DL) context. To resolve the problem of interoperability, our work aims to find a relationship between the main metadata schemas. In particular, we want to formalize knowledge through the creation of a metadata taxonomy built with the analysis and the integration of existing schemas associated with DLs. We developed a method to integrate and combine Instagram metadata and hashtags. The final result is a taxonomy, which provides innovative metadata with respect to the classification of resources, as images of Instagram and the user-generated content, that play a primary role in the context of modern DLs. The possibility of Instagram to localize the photos inserted by users allows us to interpret the most relevant and interesting informative content for a specific user type and in a specific location and to improve access, visibility and searching of library content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web)
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Open AccessArticle Environmental Factors Affecting Where People Geocache
Future Internet 2016, 8(2), 11; doi:10.3390/fi8020011
Received: 11 February 2016 / Revised: 1 April 2016 / Accepted: 5 April 2016 / Published: 12 April 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (174 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Outdoor leisure activities are important for public health as well as family cohesiveness, yet environmental factors may easily affect someone’s ability to participate in such activities. We explored this with a focus on the social web-based treasure hunt game called Geocaching. We collected
[...] Read more.
Outdoor leisure activities are important for public health as well as family cohesiveness, yet environmental factors may easily affect someone’s ability to participate in such activities. We explored this with a focus on the social web-based treasure hunt game called Geocaching. We collected data on all US and Canadian geocaches from OpenCaching.com and conducted an online survey with twenty geocachers as a follow-up to our data analysis. Data analysis showed that geocaches were more often found in areas that were wealthier, better educated, younger, and more urban, and had higher population density and better weather. Survey results showed similar trends: Most people actively thought about where they would cache and tried to minimize risks, despite cache hiders thinking less about these concerns. These results further emphasize the importance of environmental factors when it comes to participation in outdoor activities and leads to Human–Computer Interaction design implications for location-based online social activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web)
Open AccessArticle FaceMashup: An End-User Development Tool for Social Network Data
Future Internet 2016, 8(2), 10; doi:10.3390/fi8020010
Received: 20 January 2016 / Revised: 3 March 2016 / Accepted: 8 March 2016 / Published: 29 March 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2491 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Every day, each active social network user produces and shares texts, images and videos. While developers can access such data through application programming interfaces (APIs) for creating games, visualizations and routines, end users have less control on such information. Their access is mediated
[...] Read more.
Every day, each active social network user produces and shares texts, images and videos. While developers can access such data through application programming interfaces (APIs) for creating games, visualizations and routines, end users have less control on such information. Their access is mediated by the social application features, which limits them in combining sources, filtering results and performing actions on groups of elements. In order to fill this gap, we introduce FaceMashup, an end user development (EUD) environment supporting the manipulation of the Facebook graph. We describe the tool interface, documenting the choices we made during the design iterations. Data types are represented through widgets containing user interface (UI) elements similar to those used in the social network application. Widgets can be connected with each other with the drag and drop of their inner fields, and the application updates their content. Finally, we report the results of a user-test on the FaceMashup prototype, which shows a good acceptance of the environment by end-users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web)
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Open AccessArticle User Perception of Facebook App Data Access: A Comparison of Methods and Privacy Concerns
Future Internet 2016, 8(2), 9; doi:10.3390/fi8020009
Received: 22 February 2016 / Revised: 9 March 2016 / Accepted: 11 March 2016 / Published: 25 March 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1790 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Users share vast amounts of personal information online, but are they fully aware of what information they are sharing and with whom? In this paper, we focused on Facebook apps and set out to understand how concerned users are about privacy and how
[...] Read more.
Users share vast amounts of personal information online, but are they fully aware of what information they are sharing and with whom? In this paper, we focused on Facebook apps and set out to understand how concerned users are about privacy and how well-informed they are about what personal data apps can access. We found that initially, subjects were generally under-informed about what data apps could access from their profiles. After viewing additional information about these permissions, subjects’ concern about privacy on Facebook increased. Subjects’ understanding of what data apps were able to access increased, although even after receiving explicit information on the topic, many subjects still did not fully understand the extent to which apps could access their data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human–Computer Interaction and the Social Web)
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