Special Issue "Flexible Electronics"

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A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Manuel Quevedo

Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Flexible Electronics, Radiation Sensors, TFTs
Co-Guest Editor
Dr. Harish Subbaraman

Omega Optics, Inc., 8500 Shoal Creek Blvd, Austin, TX 78757, USA
E-Mail
Interests: flexible electronics, R2R ink-jet printing, phased-array antennas, flexible photonics, silicon photonics, optical interconnects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue covers both organic and inorganic materials and devices for flexible electronics. Papers in the areas of materials synthesis, characterization, and modeling, along with device fabrication and testing, are requested. Areas of interest include organic and inorganic semiconductors (n-type or p-type), memory devices, sensors, and functional devices. Papers demonstrating novel applications, including display, large-area sensors, functional devices, RFID tags, smart medical sensors, fabric, and paper-based devices will be considered. Novel, large area processing methods, such as ink-jet processing, spray pyrolysis, solution deposition, and roll-to-roll processing, are also of interest.

Dr. Manuel Quevedo
Dr. Harish Subbaraman
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • flexible electronics
  • large area sensors
  • novel materials and devices
  • large area processing

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Electrical Reliability of a Film-Type Connection during Bending
Electronics 2015, 4(4), 827-846; doi:10.3390/electronics4040827
Received: 13 July 2015 / Revised: 17 October 2015 / Accepted: 17 October 2015 / Published: 26 October 2015
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Abstract
With the escalating demands for downsizing and functionalizing mobile electronics, flexible electronics have become an important aspect of future technologies. To address limitations concerning junction deformation, we developed a new connection method using a film-type connector that is less than 0.1 mm thick.
[...] Read more.
With the escalating demands for downsizing and functionalizing mobile electronics, flexible electronics have become an important aspect of future technologies. To address limitations concerning junction deformation, we developed a new connection method using a film-type connector that is less than 0.1 mm thick. The film-type connector is composed of an organic film substrate, a UV-curable adhesive that deforms elastically under pressure, and electrodes that are arranged on the adhesive. The film-type connection relies on a plate-to-plate contact, which ensures a sufficient contact area. The electrical reliability of the film-type connection was investigated based on changes in the resistance during bending at curvature radii of 70, 50, 25, 10, 5, and 2.5 mm. The connection was bent 1000 times to investigate the reproducibility of the connector’s bending properties. The tests showed that no disconnections occurred due to bending in the vertical direction of the electrode, but disconnections were observed due to bending in the parallel direction at curvature radii of 10, 5, and 2.5 mm. In addition, the maximum average change in resistance was less than 70 milliohms unless a disconnection was generated. These results support the application of the new film-type connection in future flexible devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)
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Open AccessArticle Piezoelectric Polymer-Based Collision Detection Sensor for Robotic Applications
Electronics 2015, 4(1), 204-220; doi:10.3390/electronics4010204
Received: 2 November 2014 / Revised: 8 December 2014 / Accepted: 2 March 2015 / Published: 12 March 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1433 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The authors present a large area collision detection sensor utilizing the piezoelectric effect of polyvinylidene fluoride film. The proposed sensor system provides high dynamic range for touch sensation, as well as robust adaptability to achieve collision detection on complex-shaped surfaces. The design allows
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The authors present a large area collision detection sensor utilizing the piezoelectric effect of polyvinylidene fluoride film. The proposed sensor system provides high dynamic range for touch sensation, as well as robust adaptability to achieve collision detection on complex-shaped surfaces. The design allows for cohabitation of humans and robots in cooperative environments that require advanced and robust collision detection systems. Data presented in the paper are from sensors successfully retrofitted onto an existing commercial robotic manipulator. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)
Open AccessArticle Improving Performance and Versatility of Systems Based on Single-Frequency DFT Detectors Such as AD5933
Electronics 2015, 4(1), 1-34; doi:10.3390/electronics4010001
Received: 26 September 2014 / Accepted: 26 December 2014 / Published: 31 December 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (581 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Turning grand concepts such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and Smart Cities into reality requires the development and deployment of a wide variety of computing devices incorporated into the Internet infrastructure. Unsupervised sensing is the cornerstone capability that these devices must have
[...] Read more.
Turning grand concepts such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and Smart Cities into reality requires the development and deployment of a wide variety of computing devices incorporated into the Internet infrastructure. Unsupervised sensing is the cornerstone capability that these devices must have to perform useful functions, while also having low cost of acquisition and ownership, little energy consumption and a small footprint. Impedimetric sensing systems based on the so-called single-frequency DFT detectors possess many of these desirable attributes and are often introduced in remote monitoring and wearable devices. This study presents new methods of improving performance of such detectors. It demonstrates that the main source of systematic errors is the discontinuous test phasor causing the crosstalk between the in-phase and quadrature outputs and the leakage of the input signal. The study derives expressions for these errors as a function of the number of samples and operating frequency, and provides methods for correction. The proposed methods are applied to the operation of a practical device—a network analyzer integrated circuit AD5933—and discussed in detail. These methods achieve complete elimination of leakage errors and expansion of the low limit of the operation frequency range by nearly two decades without additional hardware. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)
Open AccessArticle Towards Realizing High-Throughput, Roll-to-Roll Manufacturing of Flexible Electronic Systems
Electronics 2014, 3(4), 624-635; doi:10.3390/electronics3040624
Received: 3 September 2014 / Revised: 15 October 2014 / Accepted: 3 November 2014 / Published: 14 November 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (2258 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
High-rate roll-to-roll (R2R) tracker systems are utilized for large volume flexible electronic device manufacturing, and the current alignment mechanism between layers is mainly achieved by relying on passive techniques. In this paper, we present a machine vision based alignment strategy that is used
[...] Read more.
High-rate roll-to-roll (R2R) tracker systems are utilized for large volume flexible electronic device manufacturing, and the current alignment mechanism between layers is mainly achieved by relying on passive techniques. In this paper, we present a machine vision based alignment strategy that is used to achieve precise registration for stacking multilayers. Based on this strategy, we demonstrate two-layer printing with alignment accuracy better than 100 μm in web moving direction and 200 μm in lateral direction at a web rate of 5 m/min. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Flexible Electronics: Integration Processes for Organic and Inorganic Semiconductor-Based Thin-Film Transistors
Electronics 2015, 4(3), 480-506; doi:10.3390/electronics4030480
Received: 29 May 2015 / Accepted: 20 July 2015 / Published: 24 July 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3649 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Flexible and transparent electronics have been studied intensively during the last few decades. The technique establishes the possibility of fabricating innovative products, from flexible displays to radio-frequency identification tags. Typically, large-area polymeric substrates such as polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are used,
[...] Read more.
Flexible and transparent electronics have been studied intensively during the last few decades. The technique establishes the possibility of fabricating innovative products, from flexible displays to radio-frequency identification tags. Typically, large-area polymeric substrates such as polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are used, which produces new requirements for the integration processes. A key element for flexible and transparent electronics is the thin-film transistor (TFT), as it is responsible for the driving current in memory cells, digital circuits or organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). In this paper, we discuss some fundamental concepts of TFT technology. Additionally, we present a comparison between the use of the semiconducting organic small-molecule pentacene and inorganic nanoparticle semiconductors in order to integrate TFTs suitable for flexible electronics. Moreover, a technique for integration with a submicron resolution suitable for glass and foil substrates is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)
Open AccessReview Review on Physically Flexible Nonvolatile Memory for Internet of Everything Electronics
Electronics 2015, 4(3), 424-479; doi:10.3390/electronics4030424
Received: 6 June 2015 / Revised: 10 July 2015 / Accepted: 14 July 2015 / Published: 23 July 2015
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (4488 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Solid-state memory is an essential component of the digital age. With advancements in healthcare technology and the Internet of Things (IoT), the demand for ultra-dense, ultra-low-power memory is increasing. In this review, we present a comprehensive perspective on the most notable approaches to
[...] Read more.
Solid-state memory is an essential component of the digital age. With advancements in healthcare technology and the Internet of Things (IoT), the demand for ultra-dense, ultra-low-power memory is increasing. In this review, we present a comprehensive perspective on the most notable approaches to the fabrication of physically flexible memory devices. With the future goal of replacing traditional mechanical hard disks with solid-state storage devices, a fully flexible electronic system will need two basic devices: transistors and nonvolatile memory. Transistors are used for logic operations and gating memory arrays, while nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices are required for storing information in the main memory and cache storage. Since the highest density of transistors and storage structures is manifested in memories, the focus of this review is flexible NVM. Flexible NVM components are discussed in terms of their functionality, performance metrics, and reliability aspects, all of which are critical components for NVM technology to be part of mainstream consumer electronics, IoT, and advanced healthcare devices. Finally, flexible NVMs are benchmarked and future prospects are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Flexible Electronics)
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