Special Issue "Graphene Mechanics"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Qing Peng

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a monatomic layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice, graphene possesses extraordinary mechanical properties, in addition to other amazing properties. The mechanical properties are of extreme importance for several potential applications, including tailoring other properties with strain engineering. In this Special Issue, we will focus on the cutting-edge studies of the graphene mechanics, from both theoretical and experimental investigations. In particular, this collection covers current areas of research that are concerned with the effect of production method and/or the presence of defects upon the mechanical integrity of graphene, the work related to the effect of graphene deformation upon its electronic properties and the possibility of employing strained graphene in future electronic applications, and reviews of the experimental and theoretical results to date on mechanical loading of freely suspended or fully supported graphene.

The Special Issue on “Graphene mechanics” is intended to provide a unique international forum aimed at covering a broad description of results involving mechanical properties, mechanical loading and engineering, and applications. Scientists working in a wide range of disciplines are invited to contribute to this cause.

The topics summarized under the keywords cover broadly examples of the greater number of sub-topics in mind. The volume is especially open for any innovative contributions involving mechanics aspects of the topics and/or sub-topics.

Prof. Dr. Qing Peng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Mechanically Robust 3D Graphene–Hydroxyapatite Hybrid Bioscaffolds with Enhanced Osteoconductive and Biocompatible Performance
Crystals 2018, 8(2), 105; doi:10.3390/cryst8020105
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2018 / Accepted: 21 February 2018 / Published: 23 February 2018
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Abstract
In this paper, we describe three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical graphene–hydroxyapatite hybrid bioscaffolds (GHBs) with a calcium phosphate salt electrochemically deposited onto the framework of graphene foam (GF). The morphology of the hydroxyapatite (HA) coverage over GF was controlled by the deposition conditions, including temperature
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In this paper, we describe three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical graphene–hydroxyapatite hybrid bioscaffolds (GHBs) with a calcium phosphate salt electrochemically deposited onto the framework of graphene foam (GF). The morphology of the hydroxyapatite (HA) coverage over GF was controlled by the deposition conditions, including temperature and voltage. The HA obtained at the higher temperature demonstrates the more uniformly distributed crystal grain with the smaller size. The as-prepared GHBs show a high elasticity with recoverable compressive strain up to 80%, and significantly enhanced strength with Young’s modulus up to 0.933 MPa compared with that of pure GF template (~7.5 kPa). Moreover, co-culture with MC3T3-E1 cells reveals that the GHBs can more effectively promote the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts with good biocompatibility than pure GF and the control group. The superior performance of GHBs suggests their promising applications as multifunctional materials for the repair and regeneration of bone defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle One Step Preparation of Fe–FeO–Graphene Nanocomposite through Pulsed Wire Discharge
Crystals 2018, 8(2), 104; doi:10.3390/cryst8020104
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 23 February 2018
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Abstract
The Fe–FeO–graphene nanocomposite material was produced successfully by pulsed wire discharge in graphene oxide (GO) suspension. Pure iron wires with a diameter of 0.25 mm and a length of 100 mm were used in the experiments. The discharge current and voltage were recorded
[...] Read more.
The Fe–FeO–graphene nanocomposite material was produced successfully by pulsed wire discharge in graphene oxide (GO) suspension. Pure iron wires with a diameter of 0.25 mm and a length of 100 mm were used in the experiments. The discharge current and voltage were recorded to analyze the process of the pulsed wire discharge. The as-prepared samples—under different charging voltages—were recovered and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Curved and loose graphene films that were anchored with spherical Fe and FeO nanoparticles were obtained at the charging voltage of 8–10 kV. The present study discusses the mechanism by which the Fe–FeO–graphene nanocomposite material was formed during the pulsed wire discharge process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle Atomic-Site-Specific Analysis on Out-of-Plane Elasticity of Convexly Curved Graphene and Its Relationship to s p 2 to s p 3 Re-Hybridization
Crystals 2018, 8(2), 102; doi:10.3390/cryst8020102
Received: 15 January 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 20 February 2018
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Abstract
The geometry of two-dimensional crystalline membranes is of interest given its unique synergistic interplay with their mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties. For one-atom-thick graphene, these properties can be substantially modified by bending at the nanometer scale. So far variations of the electronic properties
[...] Read more.
The geometry of two-dimensional crystalline membranes is of interest given its unique synergistic interplay with their mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties. For one-atom-thick graphene, these properties can be substantially modified by bending at the nanometer scale. So far variations of the electronic properties of graphene under compressing and stretching deformations have been exclusively investigated by local-probe techniques. Here we report that the interatomic attractive force introduced by atomic force microscopy triggers “single”-atom displacement and consequently enables us to determine out-of-plane elasticities of convexly curved graphene including its atomic-site-specific variation. We have quantitatively evaluated the relationship between the out-of-plane displacement and elasticity of convexly curved graphene by three-dimensional force field spectroscopy on a side-wall of a hollow tube with a well-defined curvature. The substantially small intrinsic modulus that complies with continuum mechanics has been found to increase significantly at atomically specific locations, where s p 2 to s p 3 re-hybridization would certainly take place. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle Strain Effects in Gallium Nitride Adsorption on Defective and Doped Graphene: First-Principles Calculations
Crystals 2018, 8(2), 58; doi:10.3390/cryst8020058
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2018 / Published: 26 January 2018
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Abstract
Transferable, low-stress gallium nitride grown on graphene for flexible lighting or display applications may enable next-generation optoelectronic devices. However, the growth of gallium nitride on graphene is challenging. In this study, the adsorptions of initial nucleation process of gallium nitride on graphene were
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Transferable, low-stress gallium nitride grown on graphene for flexible lighting or display applications may enable next-generation optoelectronic devices. However, the growth of gallium nitride on graphene is challenging. In this study, the adsorptions of initial nucleation process of gallium nitride on graphene were investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The adsorption energies and the role of in-plane strains were calculated for different possible configurations of the adatoms on the surfaces of vacancy defect and doped graphene. Compared with the results of the gallium adatom, adsorption of the nitrogen atom on graphene was found to exhibit greater stability. The calculations reveal that the vacancy defect core enhanced the adsorption stability of the adatom on graphene, whereas the incorporation of oxygen impurity greatly reduced the stable adsorption of the gallium and nitrogen adatoms. Furthermore, the calculations of strain showed that the lattice expansion led to increased stability for all adsorption sites and configuration surfaces, except for the nitrogen adatom adsorbed over the gallium atom in Ga-doped graphene. The study presented in this paper may have important implications in understanding gallium nitride growth on graphene. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle The Influence of Epitaxial Crystallization on the Mechanical Properties of Polyamide 66/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Injection Bar
Crystals 2017, 7(12), 384; doi:10.3390/cryst7120384
Received: 11 November 2017 / Revised: 16 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 20 December 2017
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Abstract
Polyamide 66 (PA66) was chosen as the representative of hydrophilic polymers, to investigate the influence of epitaxial crystals in semi-crystalline polymers/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite injection-molding bars. A differential scanning calorimeter was used, and the two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray diffraction technique, as well as the
[...] Read more.
Polyamide 66 (PA66) was chosen as the representative of hydrophilic polymers, to investigate the influence of epitaxial crystals in semi-crystalline polymers/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite injection-molding bars. A differential scanning calorimeter was used, and the two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray diffraction technique, as well as the two-dimensional small angle X-ray scattering technique, were used to research the crystallization behavior in PA66/RGO nanocomposites. The results indicated that RGO was an effective nucleation agent for PA66. The presence of RGO could enhance the orientation degree of the PA66 crystals and did not influence the crystal structure of the PA66. The non-epitaxial crystals and the epitaxial crystals existed in PA66/RGO nanocomposites. The size of epitaxial crystals was much greater than that of the non-epitaxial crystals. Tensile test results showed that the presence of fewer epitaxial crystals can improve the mechanical properties of a polymer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Graphene Mechanics)
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