Special Issue "CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods"

A special issue of Computation (ISSN 2079-3197). This special issue belongs to the section "Computational Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christian F. Janßen

Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Ship Theory, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), Am Schwarzenberg-Campus 4, 21073 Hamburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CFD; Lattice Boltzmann Method; GPU Computing; Free Surface Flows

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is concerned with recent advances in the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The LBM has recently matured as a viable alternative to conventional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approaches that employ Finite Volume, Finite Difference or Finite Element approximations of continuum physics equations, mostly Navier-Stokes (NS). Whilst modeling essentially similar physics as classical continuum mechanics NS procedures, LBM features a number of advantages, particularly concerning data locality and parallel computing, but also in terms of stability and dispersion properties. As the method originates from the Boltzmann equation (being a superset of NS), multi-scale modeling (even up to specific kinetic turbulence models) is possible.

This Special Issue aims at highlighting the current state-of-the-art in the field of LBM and future research directions. Both submissions with an academic background as well as more application-oriented contributions are welcome. The addressed fields of research include, but are not limited to:

  • Modeling aspects: Advanced collision operators beyond LBGK and MRT
  • Improved boundary conditions: Curved boundaries, Second-order pressure BCs, Non-reflecting velocity and pressure boundary conditions
  • Alternative gridding and grid-refinement strategies: Non-Cartesian grids, Overset grids, Compact interpolation, Stretched Cartesian grids
  • Turbulence modeling: Conventional eddy-viscosity closure, Wall-adaptive LES, RANS/LES coupling, Wall functions, Implicit LES, Turbulent inflow generators
  • Multiphase flows: High density and viscosity ratios, Hybrid perturbation models, Coupling to (inviscid) far-field methods, Singlephase free-surface models with and without surface tension
  • Performance aspects: HPC implementations on large-scale clusters and/or GPUs, Interactive monitoring, Interactive steering
  • Innovative large-scale applications of practical relevance

Dr. Christian F. Janßen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Computation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Lattice Boltzmann Method
  • High-Performance Computing
  • Multi-Scale Modeling

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Non-Isothermal Chemical Lattice Boltzmann Model Incorporating Thermal Reaction Kinetics and Enthalpy Changes
Computation 2017, 5(3), 37; doi:10.3390/computation5030037
Received: 31 May 2017 / Revised: 5 August 2017 / Accepted: 7 August 2017 / Published: 9 August 2017
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Abstract
The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient computational fluid dynamics technique that can accurately model a broad range of complex systems. As well as single-phase fluids, it can simulate thermohydrodynamic systems and passive scalar advection. In recent years, it also gained attention as
[...] Read more.
The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient computational fluid dynamics technique that can accurately model a broad range of complex systems. As well as single-phase fluids, it can simulate thermohydrodynamic systems and passive scalar advection. In recent years, it also gained attention as a means of simulating chemical phenomena, as interest in self-organization processes increased. This paper will present a widely-used and versatile lattice Boltzmann model that can simultaneously incorporate fluid dynamics, heat transfer, buoyancy-driven convection, passive scalar advection, chemical reactions and enthalpy changes. All of these effects interact in a physically accurate framework that is simple to code and readily parallelizable. As well as a complete description of the model equations, several example systems will be presented in order to demonstrate the accuracy and versatility of the method. New simulations, which analyzed the effect of a reversible reaction on the transport properties of a convecting fluid, will also be described in detail. This extra chemical degree of freedom was utilized by the system to augment its net heat flux. The numerical method outlined in this paper can be readily deployed for a vast range of complex flow problems, spanning a variety of scientific disciplines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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Open AccessArticle Using an Interactive Lattice Boltzmann Solver in Fluid Mechanics Instruction
Computation 2017, 5(3), 35; doi:10.3390/computation5030035
Received: 2 June 2017 / Revised: 12 July 2017 / Accepted: 18 July 2017 / Published: 28 July 2017
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Abstract
This article gives an overview of the diverse range of teaching applications that can be realized using an interactive lattice Boltzmann simulation tool in fluid mechanics instruction and outreach. In an inquiry-based learning framework, examples are given of learning scenarios that address instruction
[...] Read more.
This article gives an overview of the diverse range of teaching applications that can be realized using an interactive lattice Boltzmann simulation tool in fluid mechanics instruction and outreach. In an inquiry-based learning framework, examples are given of learning scenarios that address instruction on scientific results, scientific methods or the scientific process at varying levels of student activity, from consuming to applying to researching. Interactive live demonstrations on portable hardware enable new and innovative teaching concepts for fluid mechanics, also for large audiences and in the early stages of the university education. Moreover, selected examples successfully demonstrate that the integration of high-fidelity CFD methods into fluid mechanics teaching facilitates high-quality student research work within reach of the current state of the art in the respective field of research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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Open AccessArticle Implicit Large Eddy Simulation of Flow in a Micro-Orifice with the Cumulant Lattice Boltzmann Method
Computation 2017, 5(2), 23; doi:10.3390/computation5020023
Received: 29 March 2017 / Revised: 24 April 2017 / Accepted: 27 April 2017 / Published: 5 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5825 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A detailed numerical study of turbulent flow through a micro-orifice is presented in this work. The flow becomes turbulent due to the orifice at the considered Reynolds numbers (∼104). The obtained flow rates are in good agreement with the experimental
[...] Read more.
A detailed numerical study of turbulent flow through a micro-orifice is presented in this work. The flow becomes turbulent due to the orifice at the considered Reynolds numbers (∼ 10 4 ). The obtained flow rates are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The discharge coefficient and the pressure loss are presented for two input pressures. The laminar stress and the generated turbulent stresses are investigated in detail, and the location of the vena contracta is quantitatively reproduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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Open AccessArticle Esoteric Twist: An Efficient in-Place Streaming Algorithmus for the Lattice Boltzmann Method on Massively Parallel Hardware
Computation 2017, 5(2), 19; doi:10.3390/computation5020019
Received: 31 December 2016 / Revised: 4 March 2017 / Accepted: 16 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7364 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present and analyze the Esoteric Twist algorithm for the Lattice Boltzmann Method. Esoteric Twist is a thread safe in-place streaming method that combines streaming and collision and requires only a single data set. Compared to other in-place streaming techniques, Esoteric Twist minimizes
[...] Read more.
We present and analyze the Esoteric Twist algorithm for the Lattice Boltzmann Method. Esoteric Twist is a thread safe in-place streaming method that combines streaming and collision and requires only a single data set. Compared to other in-place streaming techniques, Esoteric Twist minimizes the memory footprint and the memory traffic when indirect addressing is used. Esoteric Twist is particularly suitable for the implementation of the Lattice Boltzmann Method on Graphic Processing Units. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Pore Structure on Soot Deposition in Diesel Particulate Filter
Computation 2016, 4(4), 46; doi:10.3390/computation4040046
Received: 21 October 2016 / Revised: 17 November 2016 / Accepted: 29 November 2016 / Published: 2 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4121 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, in the after-treatment of diesel exhaust gas, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been used to trap nano-particles of the diesel soot. However, as there are more particles inside the filter, the pressure which corresponds to the filter backpressure increases, which worsens
[...] Read more.
Nowadays, in the after-treatment of diesel exhaust gas, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) has been used to trap nano-particles of the diesel soot. However, as there are more particles inside the filter, the pressure which corresponds to the filter backpressure increases, which worsens the fuel consumption rate, together with the abatement of the available torque. Thus, a filter with lower backpressure would be needed. To achieve this, it is necessary to utilize the information on the phenomena including both the soot transport and its removal inside the DPF, and optimize the filter substrate structure. In this paper, to obtain useful information for optimization of the filter structure, we tested seven filters with different porosities and pore sizes. The porosity and pore size were changed systematically. To consider the soot filtration, the particle-laden flow was simulated by a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Then, the flow field and the pressure change were discussed during the filtration process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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Open AccessArticle Steady-State Anderson Accelerated Coupling of Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes Solvers
Computation 2016, 4(4), 38; doi:10.3390/computation4040038
Received: 20 July 2016 / Revised: 26 September 2016 / Accepted: 8 October 2016 / Published: 17 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6100 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present an Anderson acceleration-based approach to spatially couple three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes (LBNS) flow simulations. This allows to locally exploit the computational features of both fluid flow solver approaches to the fullest extent and yields enhanced control to match the LB
[...] Read more.
We present an Anderson acceleration-based approach to spatially couple three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes (LBNS) flow simulations. This allows to locally exploit the computational features of both fluid flow solver approaches to the fullest extent and yields enhanced control to match the LB and NS degrees of freedom within the LBNS overlap layer. Designed for parallel Schwarz coupling, the Anderson acceleration allows for the simultaneous execution of both Lattice Boltzmann and Navier–Stokes solver. We detail our coupling methodology, validate it, and study convergence and accuracy of the Anderson accelerated coupling, considering three steady-state scenarios: plane channel flow, flow around a sphere and channel flow across a porous structure. We find that the Anderson accelerated coupling yields a speed-up (in terms of iteration steps) of up to 40% in the considered scenarios, compared to strictly sequential Schwarz coupling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CFD: Recent Advances in Lattice Boltzmann Methods)
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