Special Issue "Cellular Stress Response in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alessandra Stacchiotti

Division of Human Anatomy, Department Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Brescia University, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ER stress; aging; obesity; mitochondria damage; microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stress is implied in cellular life, and according to the “hormesis principle”, a mild cellular stress is sometimes useful to best react against a more severe insult. Historically, we owe the seminal discovery of the “heat stress response” to the Italian scientist Ferruccio Ritossa in the 1960s, which demonstrated an intense transcriptional activity in chromosomal puffs in heated Drosophila salivary glands. Afterwards, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been characterized not only in hyperthermia but also in the response to environmental, metabolic, or toxic inputs. In aging, a stressful reaction occurs because stress proteins are reduced. However, HSPs are not only inside cells but also in the extracellular environment in cancer, inflammation, and intercellular communication through exosomes. Besides classical HSPs, when homeostasis is disrupted, abnormal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR). This mechanism is dramatically involved in the pathogenesis of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in retinal damage, and in cardiovascular and metabolic morbidities. So, strategies aimed at modulating ER stress or mitochondrial response are crucial. This Special Issue offers an Open Access forum that aims to bring together a collection of original research and review articles addressing the expanding field of cellular stress response and modulation. We hope to provide a stimulating resource for the fascinating subject of cell stress research. Suggested potential topics may be: hormesis; ER stress and mitochondrial stress in diseases; the role of HSPs in exercise and in longevity; molecular chaperones as therapeutic targets; exosomes and HSPs; and new models to study stress response

Dr. Alessandra Stacchiotti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • heat shock proteins
  • mitochondria-associated membranes
  • neurodegenerative disorders
  • ER stress response and UPR
  • metabolic disorders

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Metabolic Stress in the Immune Function of T Cells, Macrophages and Dendritic Cells
Received: 12 May 2018 / Revised: 20 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1793 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Innate and adaptive immune cells from myeloid and lymphoid lineages resolve host infection or cell stress by mounting an appropriate and durable immune response. Upon sensing of cellular insults, immune cells become activated and undergo rapid and efficient functional changes to unleash biosynthesis
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Innate and adaptive immune cells from myeloid and lymphoid lineages resolve host infection or cell stress by mounting an appropriate and durable immune response. Upon sensing of cellular insults, immune cells become activated and undergo rapid and efficient functional changes to unleash biosynthesis of macromolecules, proliferation, survival, and trafficking; unprecedented events among other mammalian cells within the host. These changes must become operational within restricted timing to rapidly control the insult and to avoid tissue damage and pathogen spread. Such changes occur at high energy cost. Recent advances have established that plasticity of immune functions occurs in distinct metabolic stress features. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that specific metabolic signatures dictate appropriate immune functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. Importantly, recent studies have shed light on whether successfully manipulating particular metabolic targets is sufficient to modulate immune function and polarization, thereby offering strong therapeutic potential for various common immune-mediated diseases, including inflammation and autoimmune-associated diseases and cancer. In this review, we detail how cellular metabolism controls immune function and phenotype within T cells and macrophages particularly, and the distinct molecular metabolic programming and targets instrumental to engage this regulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular Stress Response in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessReview Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Disorders
Received: 14 May 2018 / Revised: 12 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1252 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metabolic disorders have become among the most serious threats to human health, leading to severe chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as cardiovascular diseases. Interestingly, despite the fact that each of these diseases has
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Metabolic disorders have become among the most serious threats to human health, leading to severe chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, as well as cardiovascular diseases. Interestingly, despite the fact that each of these diseases has different physiological and clinical symptoms, they appear to share certain pathological traits such as intracellular stress and inflammation induced by metabolic disturbance stemmed from over nutrition frequently aggravated by a modern, sedentary life style. These modern ways of living inundate cells and organs with saturating levels of sugar and fat, leading to glycotoxicity and lipotoxicity that induce intracellular stress signaling ranging from oxidative to ER stress response to cope with the metabolic insults (Mukherjee, et al., 2015). In this review, we discuss the roles played by cellular stress and its responses in shaping metabolic disorders. We have summarized here current mechanistic insights explaining the pathogenesis of these disorders. These are followed by a discussion of the latest therapies targeting the stress response pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular Stress Response in Health and Disease)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Unfolding the Endoplasmic Reticulum of a Social Amoeba: Dictyostelium discoideum as a New Model for the Study of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 10 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a membranous network with an intricate dynamic architecture necessary for various essential cellular processes. Nearly one third of the proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway are folded and matured in the ER. Additionally, it acts as calcium storage,
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The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a membranous network with an intricate dynamic architecture necessary for various essential cellular processes. Nearly one third of the proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway are folded and matured in the ER. Additionally, it acts as calcium storage, and it is a main source for lipid biosynthesis. The ER is highly connected with other organelles through regions of membrane apposition that allow organelle remodeling, as well as lipid and calcium traffic. Cells are under constant changes due to metabolic requirements and environmental conditions that challenge the ER network’s maintenance. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling pathway that restores homeostasis of this intracellular compartment upon ER stress conditions by reducing the load of proteins, and by increasing the processes of protein folding and degradation. Significant progress on the study of the mechanisms that restore ER homeostasis was achieved using model organisms such as yeast, Arabidopsis, and mammalian cells. In this review, we address the current knowledge on ER architecture and ER stress response in Dictyostelium discoideum. This social amoeba alternates between unicellular and multicellular phases and is recognized as a valuable biomedical model organism and an alternative to yeast, particularly for the presence of traits conserved in animal cells that were lost in fungi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular Stress Response in Health and Disease)
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