Special Issue "Nanobiotechnology for Biofuel Production: Renewable and Sustainable Sources"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Munish Puri

Senior Research Fellow Bioprocessing Laboratory, Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Victoria 3217, Australia
E-Mail
Phone: +61-3-5227-2325
Interests: nanomaterials; enzyme immobilization; biomass pretreatment; lignocellulose; lipids; algal harvesting
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Takuya Tsuzuki

College of Engineering and Computer Science The Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-261-259-296
Interests: nanoparticles; nanofibers; nanocomposites; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials will likely become an integral part of sustainable bioenergy production as it helps in designing biocatalysts with excellent activity, greater selectivity, and high stability. The properties of enzymes can easily be tuned by tailoring the size, shape, and morphology of the particular nanomaterial. The resulting interaction of enzymes with nanomaterials has made possible the development of a new nanobiocatlytic system(s) that has a variety of applications. This Special Issue is devoted to recent research in the use of nanomaterials for immobilizing enzymes, evolved immobilized enzymes chemistries, and evaluation of the efficiency of nano-conjugated enzymes in the processing of synthetic substrates/biomass for producing biofuels.

The Special Issue will cover:

  • Use of various nanomaterials (supports) for immobilizing enzymes such as cellulases, xylanases, glucosidases, lipases, lignases, etc.
  • Recent developments in biomass processing (agriculture waste, grasses, food waste processing) employing novel nanomaterial supports for enzyme-immobilization for biofuel production at bench scale/pilot-scale.
  • Commercial applications of nanostructured materials in bioenergy development, as well as biofuel harvesting, and associated chemistries are of interest to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Munish Puri, FRSC
Prof. Dr. Takuya Tsuzuki
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biofuels
  • Biodiesel
  • Pretreatment
  • Immobilization
  • Functionalisation
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanotechnology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Well-Shaped Sulfonic Organosilica Nanotubes with High Activity for Hydrolysis of Cellobiose
Catalysts 2017, 7(5), 127; doi:10.3390/catal7050127
Received: 14 March 2017 / Revised: 8 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 27 April 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4648 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sulfonic organosilica nanotubes with different acidity densities could be synthesized through the co-condensation of ethenyl- or phenylene-bridged organosilane and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane followed by sulfhydryl (–SH) oxidation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment clearly exhibit the hollow nanotube structures with the diameters
[...] Read more.
Sulfonic organosilica nanotubes with different acidity densities could be synthesized through the co-condensation of ethenyl- or phenylene-bridged organosilane and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane followed by sulfhydryl (–SH) oxidation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment clearly exhibit the hollow nanotube structures with the diameters of about 5 nm. The compositions of the nanotube frameworks are confirmed by solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that about 60–80% of SH groups were oxidized to sulfonic acid (SO3H). The acid contents were measured by both elemental analysis (CHNS mode) and acid-base titration experiment, which revealed that the acid density was in the range of 0.74 to 4.37 μmol·m−2 on the solid. These nanotube-based acid catalysts exhibited excellent performances in the hydrolysis of cellobiose with the highest conversion of 92% and glucose selectivity of 96%. In addition, the catalysts could maintain high activity (65% conversion with 92% selectivity) even after six recycles. Full article
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