Special Issue "Catalytic Oxidation in Environmental Protection"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Eleni Iliopoulou

Laboratory of Environmental Fuels and Hydrocarbons (LEFH), Chemical Process and Energy Resources Institute (CPERI), Centre for Research & Technology Hellas (CERTH), 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +302310498312
Interests: catalytic abatement of atmospheric pollutants (CO, NOx, SOx, methane); heterogeneous catalysts synthesis; mesoporous materials; nanostructured metal oxides; zeolites; supported catalysts; structure/activity/selectivity relationships in catalysis; lignocellulosic waste biomass; valorization; biofuels; bio-commodities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As is well known, interest in different aspects of environmental catalysis has been steadily growing, in both academic and industrial sectors, and, thus, great efforts have been devoted worldwide to investigate the design, synthesis and application of novel multifunctional materials as oxidation catalysts for the removal of harmful pollutants, aiming to improve air and water quality. The first case refers to a plethora of major air pollutants emitted from various sources, such as CO, VOCs, ozone, particulate matter, other toxic air pollutants (including ammonia, benzene, dioxin, mercury, etc.), and, of course, greenhouse gases, such as methane and nitrous oxide. Concerning the latter case, a large variety of research groups are devoted to the evaluation of new photocatalytic materials and the elimination of contaminants and pathogens in both aqueous and gaseous phases, while other additionally deal with water decontamination by processes, such as catalytic wet peroxide oxidation, Fenton-alike reactions and electrochemical oxidation.

The current Special Issue aspires to compile some of the most recent and forward-looking concepts related with all aspects of catalytic oxidation technology for environmental protection, ranging from design and synthesis, characterization, efficiency and deactivation of novel materials, as well as new pioneering concepts of catalytic processes, reaction kinetics and modelling/simulation of materials and reactions.

Dr. Eleni Iliopoulou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pollution abatement (CO, VOCs, methane, ammonia, soot, etc.)
  • wet-oxidation
  • photo- and electrocatalysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Wood-Biochar-Supported Magnetite Nanoparticles for Remediation of PAH-Contaminated Estuary Sediment
Catalysts 2018, 8(2), 73; doi:10.3390/catal8020073
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
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Abstract
In this study, we investigated the ability of a magnetic wood biochar (WB)-based composite catalyst (Fe3O4–WB) to catalyze sodium persulfate (PS) for the remediation of estuary sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The effects of various critical parameters,
[...] Read more.
In this study, we investigated the ability of a magnetic wood biochar (WB)-based composite catalyst (Fe3O4–WB) to catalyze sodium persulfate (PS) for the remediation of estuary sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The effects of various critical parameters, including the catalyst dose and initial pH, were investigated. The degradation of the PAHs was found to be related to the number of rings in their structure. The results showed that Fe3O4–WB is an efficient catalyst for the removal of high-ring PAHs (HPAHs), with the highest degradation rates for the 6-, 5-, and 4-ringed PAHs being 90%, 84%, and 87%, respectively, for a PS concentration of 2 × 10−5 M, catalyst concentration of 3.33 g/L, and pH of 3.0. That the reduction rate of the HPAHs was greater than that of the low-ring PAHs can be attributed to the strong affinity of the HPAHs for biochar derived from wood biomass. Overall, this study revealed that the WB-mediated electron transfer catalysis of the surface functional groups in a wide range of pH in the Fe3O4–WB/PS system and potentially application in the remediation of sediments contaminated with PAHs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Oxidation in Environmental Protection)
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Open AccessArticle Removal of NOX Using Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor over Fe/TiO2 Catalysts and an Absorption Technique
Catalysts 2017, 7(12), 386; doi:10.3390/catal7120386
Received: 17 October 2017 / Revised: 25 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
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Abstract
In this study, we proposed an innovative oxidation–absorption method for low-temperature denitrification (160–240 °C), in which NO is initially catalytically oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) vapor over titania-based catalysts, and the oxidation products are then absorbed by NaOH solution.
[...] Read more.
In this study, we proposed an innovative oxidation–absorption method for low-temperature denitrification (160–240 °C), in which NO is initially catalytically oxidized by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) vapor over titania-based catalysts, and the oxidation products are then absorbed by NaOH solution. The effects of flue gas temperature, molar H2O2/NO ratio, gas hourly space velocity (GHSV), and Fe substitution amounts of Fe/TiO2 catalysts on the denitrification efficiency were investigated by a well-designed experiment. The results indicated that the Fe/TiO2 catalyst exhibited a combination of remarkable activity and deep oxidation ability (NO converted into harmless NO3). In order to comprehend the functional mechanism of the Fe dopant’s local environment in TiO2 support, the promotional effect of the calcination temperature of Fe/TiO2 on the denitration performance was also studied. A tentative synergetic mechanism could be interpreted from two aspects: (1) Fe3+ as a substitute of Ti4+, leading to the formation of enriched oxygen vacancies at the surface, could significantly improve the adsorption efficiency of •OH; (2) the isolated surface Fe ion holds a strong adsorption affinity for NO, such that the adsorbed NO could be easily oxidized by the pre-formed •OH. This process offers a promising alternative for current denitrification technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Oxidation in Environmental Protection)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Preparation Method on the Structure and Catalytic Activity of Ag–Fe2O3 Catalysts Derived from MOFs
Catalysts 2017, 7(12), 382; doi:10.3390/catal7120382
Received: 30 October 2017 / Revised: 4 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 9 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4037 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, Ag–Fe2O3 catalysts were successfully prepared using several different methods. Our main intention was to investigate the effect of the preparation methods on the catalysts’ structure and their catalytic performance for CO oxidation. The catalysts were characterized by
[...] Read more.
In this work, Ag–Fe2O3 catalysts were successfully prepared using several different methods. Our main intention was to investigate the effect of the preparation methods on the catalysts’ structure and their catalytic performance for CO oxidation. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption–desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2-temperature program reduction (H2-TPR) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Ag–Fe catalysts prepared by impregnating Ag into MIL-100 (Fe) presented the best catalytic activity, over which CO could be completely oxidized at 160 °C. Based on the characterization, it was found that more metallic Ag species and porosity existed on Ag–Fe catalysts, which could efficiently absorb atmospheric oxygen and, thus, enhance the CO oxidation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Oxidation in Environmental Protection)
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