Special Issue "Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alain Roucoux

Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of metal nanoparticles (in solution or on support); nanocatalysis in polyphasic media; magnetic nanoparticles; catalytic applications in polyphasic media; surface reactivity: organization and shape control
Guest Editor
Dr. Audrey Denicourt

Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of metal nanoparticles (in solution or on support); nanocatalysis in polyphasic media; magnetic nanoparticles; catalytic applications in polyphasic media; surface reactivity: organization and shape control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, noble metal nanoparticles are considered as an interesting compromise for catalysis at the border between mononuclear complexes and heterogeneous bulk catalysts. These species, soluble in a liquid phase, are considered as “pseudo homogeneous” systems, and their potentialities in catalytic reactions are now commonly admitted by the scientific community with an increasing attention during the last twenty years.

Nanometer-sized and well-controlled metal species, namely nanoparticles (NPs), are usually synthesized by a bottom-up approach with a variety of methods according to the media (water, organic, ionic liquids, supercritical CO2 or fluorinated phase, etc.) and the nature of the metal precursor (metal salt or organometallic complex), as well as the large range of protective agents used. These nanocatalysts have proved to be efficient and selective for various reactions, owing to a great number of potential active sites and an original surface reactivity.

This Special Issue focuses on recent researches in catalytic applications using soluble metal nanoparticles including advances in: (1) the development of improved and sustainable synthesis in various media; (2) the understanding of surface reactivity; and (3) the search of original and relevant catalytic activities and/or selectivities, potentially combined with recycling constraints, to achieve more efficient catalytic and economically viable processes

Prof. Alain Roucoux
Dr. Audrey Denicourt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Noble metals
  • Nanoparticles
  • Colloids
  • Catalysis
  • Polyphasic media
  • Surface reactivity

 

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Comparison Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol by Gold Nanospheres and Gold Nanostars
Catalysts 2017, 7(2), 38; doi:10.3390/catal7020038
Received: 12 December 2016 / Revised: 18 January 2017 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 24 January 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In order to investigate structure-property relationships, the catalytic properties of gold nanoparticles were evaluated in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4. Using catalyst suspensions with identical amounts of gold, the following key results were obtained: first, the nanostars showed increased activity
[...] Read more.
In order to investigate structure-property relationships, the catalytic properties of gold nanoparticles were evaluated in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4. Using catalyst suspensions with identical amounts of gold, the following key results were obtained: first, the nanostars showed increased activity as compared to spherical gold nanoparticles; second, larger gold nanostars showed higher activity, likely because of the abundance of flat/spiky features on these particles, which show high metal utilization; third, treatment of the nanostar colloid with cucurbit[7]uril can be used to balance catalyst stability and activity; fourth, as expected from the decreasing surface atom fraction, the specific activity of the spherical nanoparticles decreased with increasing particle size. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Facile Sonication Synthesis of WS2 Quantum Dots for Photoelectrochemical Performance
Catalysts 2017, 7(1), 18; doi:10.3390/catal7010018
Received: 28 November 2016 / Revised: 27 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 6 January 2017
PDF Full-text (3093 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, such as tungsten disulfide (WS2), have been actively studied as suitable candidates for photocatalysts due to their unique structural and electronic properties. The presence of active sites at the edges and the higher specific surface area of
[...] Read more.
Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, such as tungsten disulfide (WS2), have been actively studied as suitable candidates for photocatalysts due to their unique structural and electronic properties. The presence of active sites at the edges and the higher specific surface area of these materials are crucial to the photocatalytic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction. Here, WS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been successfully synthesized by using a combination of grinding and sonication techniques. The morphology of the QDs was observed, using transmission electron microscopy and an atomic force microscope, to have uniform sizes of less than 5 nm. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) measurements show that the current density of WS2 QDs under illumination is almost two times higher than that of pristine WS2. Furthermore, these high-quality WS2 QDs may have various applications in optoelectronics, solar cells, and biomedicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Aqueous-Phase Catalytic Chemical Reduction of p-Nitrophenol Employing Soluble Gold Nanoparticles with Different Shapes
Catalysts 2016, 6(12), 215; doi:10.3390/catal6120215
Received: 3 November 2016 / Revised: 30 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 December 2016 / Published: 21 December 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4029 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gold nanoparticles with different shapes were prepared and used as catalysts in the reduction of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the aqueous phase and in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). Parameters such as the reaction temperature, substrate/NaBH4 molar ratio, and
[...] Read more.
Gold nanoparticles with different shapes were prepared and used as catalysts in the reduction of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in the aqueous phase and in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). Parameters such as the reaction temperature, substrate/NaBH4 molar ratio, and substrate/gold molar ratio were tested and evaluated. In this paper, we compare the catalytic reactivities of gold nanorods (AuNRs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs), both synthesized by the seed-mediated method in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Physical-chemical parameters such as the apparent rate constant (kapp) and activation energy (Ea) of the reactions were obtained for both systems. We observed that the catalytic system based on AuNRs is the most active. These colloidal dispersions were investigated and fully characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV–Vis) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle P-Stereogenic Phosphines for the Stabilisation of Metal Nanoparticles. A Surface State Study
Catalysts 2016, 6(12), 213; doi:10.3390/catal6120213
Received: 9 November 2016 / Revised: 13 December 2016 / Accepted: 13 December 2016 / Published: 20 December 2016
PDF Full-text (3437 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Palladium and ruthenium nanoparticles have been prepared following the organometallic precursor decomposition methodology, under dihydrogen pressure and in the presence of borane protected P-stereogenic phosphines. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) monitoring of the corresponding syntheses has permitted to determine the optimal metal/ligand ratio
[...] Read more.
Palladium and ruthenium nanoparticles have been prepared following the organometallic precursor decomposition methodology, under dihydrogen pressure and in the presence of borane protected P-stereogenic phosphines. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) monitoring of the corresponding syntheses has permitted to determine the optimal metal/ligand ratio for leading to small and well-dispersed nanoparticles. Exchange ligand reactions of the as-prepared materials have proven the strong interaction of the phosphines with the metal surface; only oxidative treatment using hydrogen peroxide could release the phosphine-based stabiliser from the metal surface. Pd and Ru nanoparticles have been evaluated in hydrogenation reactions, confirming the robustness of the stabilisers, which selectively permitted the hydrogenation of exocyclic C=C bonds, preventing the coordination of the aromatic rings and as a result, their hydrogenation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview On Metal Segregation of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Prepared by a One-Pot Method in Microemulsions
Catalysts 2017, 7(2), 68; doi:10.3390/catal7020068
Received: 28 December 2016 / Revised: 8 February 2017 / Accepted: 10 February 2017 / Published: 17 February 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1917 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A comparative study on different bimetallic nanocatalysts prepared from microemulsions using a one-pot method has been carried out. The analysis of experimental observations, complemented by simulation studies, provides detailed insight into the factors affecting nanoparticle architecture: (1) The metal segregation in a bimetallic
[...] Read more.
A comparative study on different bimetallic nanocatalysts prepared from microemulsions using a one-pot method has been carried out. The analysis of experimental observations, complemented by simulation studies, provides detailed insight into the factors affecting nanoparticle architecture: (1) The metal segregation in a bimetallic nanocatalysts is the result of the combination of three main kinetic parameters: the reduction rate of metal precursors (related to reduction standard potentials), the material intermicellar exchange rate (determined by microemulsion composition), and the metal precursors concentration; (2) A minimum difference between the reduction standard potentials of the two metals of 0.20 V is needed to obtain a core-shell structure. For values ∆ε0 smaller than 0.20 V the obtaining of alloys cannot be avoided, neither by changing the microemulsion nor by increasing metal concentration; (3) As a rule, the higher the film flexibility around the micelles, the higher the degree of mixture in the nanocatalyst; (4) A minimum concentration of metal precursors is required to get a core-shell structure. This minimum concentration depends on the microemulsion flexibility and on the difference in reduction rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soluble Nanoparticles in Catalytic Applications)
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