Special Issue "Tumor Angiogenesis: An Update"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ruowen Ge

Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, 117543, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: angiogenesis; cancer microenvironment; anti-angiogenic proteins; endothelial cell biology; hepatogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the approval of the first anti-angiogenesis drug, Avastin, for treatment of colon cancer in 2004, efficacy limitations of this class of anticancer drugs have generated questions and doubts on the effectiveness of the anti-angiogenesis approach for anticancer treatment. Recent discoveries in the biology of tumor angiogenesis indicate that many new factors and regulators are involved in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis such as the immune system, microRNA, ion channel, autophagy, etc. This Special Issue will focus on new discoveries in the biology and drug targeting of tumor angiogenesis. Both review and research articles are welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions. 

Dr. Ruowen Ge
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Recombinant TSR1 of ADAMTS5 Suppresses Melanoma Growth in Mice via an Anti-angiogenic Mechanism
Cancers 2018, 10(6), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10060192
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 7 June 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
PDF Full-text (2353 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Inhibiting tumor angiogenesis is a well-established approach for anticancer therapeutic development. A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin Motifs 5 (ADAMTS5) is a secreted matrix metalloproteinase in the ADAMTS family that also functions as an anti-angiogenic/anti-tumorigenic molecule. Its anti-angiogenic/anti-tumorigenic function is independent from its
[...] Read more.
Inhibiting tumor angiogenesis is a well-established approach for anticancer therapeutic development. A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase with ThromboSpondin Motifs 5 (ADAMTS5) is a secreted matrix metalloproteinase in the ADAMTS family that also functions as an anti-angiogenic/anti-tumorigenic molecule. Its anti-angiogenic/anti-tumorigenic function is independent from its proteinase activity, but requires its first thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR1). However, it is not known if recombinant TSR1 (rTSR1) can function as an anticancer therapeutic. In this report, we expressed and purified a 75-residue recombinant TSR1 polypeptide from E. coli and investigated its ability to function as an anticancer therapeutic in mice. We demonstrate that rTSR1 is present in the blood circulation as well as in the tumor tissue at 15 min post intraperitoneal injection. Intraperitoneal delivery of rTSR1 potently suppressed subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma growth as a single agent, accompanied by diminished tumor angiogenesis, increased apoptosis, and reduced cell proliferation in the tumor tissue. Consistently, rTSR1 dose-dependently induced the apoptosis of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a caspase-dependent manner. This work indicates that rTSR1 of ADAMTS5 can function as a potent anticancer therapy in mice. It thus has the potential to be further developed into an anticancer drug. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Angiogenesis: An Update)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview The Methylation Status of the Epigenome: Its Emerging Role in the Regulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth, and Potential for Drug Targeting
Cancers 2018, 10(8), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10080268
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 27 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
PDF Full-text (1924 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Approximately 50 years ago, Judah Folkman raised the concept of inhibiting tumor angiogenesis for treating solid tumors. The development of anti-angiogenic drugs would decrease or even arrest tumor growth by restricting the delivery of oxygen and nutrient supplies, while at the same time
[...] Read more.
Approximately 50 years ago, Judah Folkman raised the concept of inhibiting tumor angiogenesis for treating solid tumors. The development of anti-angiogenic drugs would decrease or even arrest tumor growth by restricting the delivery of oxygen and nutrient supplies, while at the same time display minimal toxic side effects to healthy tissues. Bevacizumab (Avastin)—a humanized monoclonal anti VEGF-A antibody—is now used as anti-angiogenic drug in several forms of cancers, yet with variable results. Recent years brought significant progresses in our understanding of the role of chromatin remodeling and epigenetic mechanisms in the regulation of angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. Many inhibitors of DNA methylation as well as of histone methylation, have been successfully tested in preclinical studies and some are currently undergoing evaluation in phase I, II or III clinical trials, either as cytostatic molecules—reducing the proliferation of cancerous cells—or as tumor angiogenesis inhibitors. In this review, we will focus on the methylation status of the vascular epigenome, based on the genomic DNA methylation patterns with DNA methylation being mainly transcriptionally repressive, and lysine/arginine histone post-translational modifications which either promote or repress the chromatin transcriptional state. Finally, we discuss the potential use of “epidrugs” in efficient control of tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tumor Angiogenesis: An Update)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top