Special Issue "New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bruno Aouizerate

Regional reference center for the management and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders, Expert center for resistant depression (Foundation FondaMental), Charles Perrens Hospital, F-33076 Bordeaux, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: immuno-inflammation; frontal-subcortical loops; cognition; motivation; major depression; obsessive–compulsive disorder
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Emmanuel Haffen

Department of Neuroscience, FondaMental Foundation, CIC-IT 808, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: major depression; motivation; decision-making; non-invasive brain stimulation; immuno-inflammation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Major depression and obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) are now recognized among the most frequent psychiatric disorders, affecting 16–17% and 2–3% of the general population, respectively. They are commonly characterized by: i) a high level of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities; ii) a recurrence or chronic profile; and iii) a negative impact on daily functions, thereby leading to a profound impairment of quality of life. Despite significant advances in pharmacological and psychological therapies over the last decades, unsuccessful responses to standard treatment strategies are classically observed in approximately 20–30% of cases. Therefore, there is a significant need for improving the pathophysiological knowledge through a better identification of environmental, clinical, psychological, genetic, anatomical, and biological determinants, specifically implied in the development, the phenotypic expression, and the relapsing course and/or contributing to the therapeutic failure in major depression and OCD. We are convinced that this research approach is particularly relevant providing critical support for the promotion of innovative treatment alternatives potentially useful for the management of resistant forms of major depression and OCD. We thus encourage the submission of original research conducted in either humans or animal models, or updated reviews covering this topic for the present Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Bruno Aouizerate
Prof. Dr. Emmanuel Haffen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • negative life events
  • genetic
  • functional anatomy
  • neurochemistry
  • immune-inflammatory function
  • stress-responsive neuroendocrine system
  • cognition
  • clinical phenotype
  • innovative treatments
  • major depression
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle From e-Health to i-Health: Prospective Reflexions on the Use of Intelligent Systems in Mental Health Care
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(6), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8060098
Received: 25 April 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 28 May 2018 / Published: 31 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (736 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Depressive disorders cover a set of disabling problems, often chronic or recurrent. They are characterized by a high level of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities and represent an important public health problem. To date, therapeutic solutions remain unsatisfactory. For some researchers, this is a
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Depressive disorders cover a set of disabling problems, often chronic or recurrent. They are characterized by a high level of psychiatric and somatic comorbidities and represent an important public health problem. To date, therapeutic solutions remain unsatisfactory. For some researchers, this is a sign of decisive paradigmatic failure due to the way in which disorders are conceptualized. They hypothesize that the symptoms of a categorical disorder, or of different comorbid disorders, can be interwoven in chains of interdependencies on different elements, of which it would be possible to act independently and synergistically to influence the functioning of the symptom system, rather than limiting oneself to targeting a hypothetical single underlying cause. New connected technologies make it possible to invent new observation and intervention tools allowing better phenotypic characterization of disorders and their evolution, that fit particularly well into this new “symptoms network” paradigm. Synergies are possible and desirable between these technological and epistemological innovations and can possibly help to solve some of the difficult problems people with mental disorders face in their everyday life, as we will show through a fictional case study exploring the possibilities of connected technologies in mental disorders in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Individualized Immunological Data for Precise Classification of OCD Patients
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(8), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8080149
Received: 16 May 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 3 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) affects about 2% of the general population, for which several etiological factors were identified. Important among these is immunological dysfunction. This review aims to show how immunology can inform specific etiological factors, and how distinguishing between these etiologies is important
[...] Read more.
Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) affects about 2% of the general population, for which several etiological factors were identified. Important among these is immunological dysfunction. This review aims to show how immunology can inform specific etiological factors, and how distinguishing between these etiologies is important from a personalized treatment perspective. We found discrepancies concerning cytokines, raising the hypothesis of specific immunological etiological factors. Antibody studies support the existence of a potential autoimmune etiological factor. Infections may also provoke OCD symptoms, and therefore, could be considered as specific etiological factors with specific immunological impairments. Finally, we underline the importance of distinguishing between different etiological factors since some specific treatments already exist in the context of immunological factors for the improvement of classic treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
Open AccessReview Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): A Promising Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder?
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(5), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8050081
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 6 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (218 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) opens new perspectives in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), because of its ability to modulate cortical excitability and induce long-lasting effects. The aim of this review is to summarize the current status of knowledge regarding
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Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) opens new perspectives in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), because of its ability to modulate cortical excitability and induce long-lasting effects. The aim of this review is to summarize the current status of knowledge regarding tDCS application in MDD. Methods: In this review, we searched for articles published in PubMed/MEDLINE from the earliest available date to February 2018 that explored clinical and cognitive effects of tDCS in MDD. Results: Despite differences in design and stimulation parameters, the examined studies indicated beneficial effects of tDCS for MDD. These preliminary results, the non-invasiveness of tDCS, and its good tolerability support the need for further research on this technique. Conclusions: tDCS constitutes a promising therapeutic alternative for patients with MDD, but its place in the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be determined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
Open AccessReview Depression, Olfaction, and Quality of Life: A Mutual Relationship
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(5), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8050080
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 4 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (316 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Olfactory dysfunction has been well studied in depression. Common brain areas are involved in depression and in the olfactory process, suggesting that olfactory impairments may constitute potential markers of this disorder. Olfactory markers of depression can be either state (present only in symptomatic
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Olfactory dysfunction has been well studied in depression. Common brain areas are involved in depression and in the olfactory process, suggesting that olfactory impairments may constitute potential markers of this disorder. Olfactory markers of depression can be either state (present only in symptomatic phases) or trait (persistent after symptomatic remission) markers. This study presents the etiology of depression, the anatomical links between olfaction and depression, and a literature review of different olfactory markers of depression. Several studies have also shown that olfactory impairment affects the quality of life and that olfactory disorders can affect daily life and may be lead to depression. Thus, this study discusses the links between olfactory processing, depression, and quality of life. Finally, olfaction is an innovative research field that may constitute a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
Open AccessReview Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Systematic Review
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8020037
Received: 9 January 2018 / Revised: 19 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 24 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (936 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Despite the advances in psychopharmacology and established psychotherapeutic interventions, more than 40% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not respond to conventional treatment approaches. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been recently proposed as a therapeutic tool to alleviate treatment-resistant symptoms in
[...] Read more.
Despite the advances in psychopharmacology and established psychotherapeutic interventions, more than 40% of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not respond to conventional treatment approaches. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been recently proposed as a therapeutic tool to alleviate treatment-resistant symptoms in patients with OCD. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of the art and future clinical applications of tDCS in patients with OCD. A literature search conducted on the PubMed database following PRISMA guidelines and completed by a manual search yielded 12 results: eight case reports, three open-label studies (with 5, 8, and 42 participants), and one randomized trial with two active conditions (12 patients). There was no sham-controlled study. A total of 77 patients received active tDCS with a large diversity of electrode montages mainly targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex or the (pre-) supplementary motor area. Despite methodological limitations and the heterogeneity of stimulation parameters, tDCS appears to be a promising tool to decrease obsessive-compulsive symptoms as well as comorbid depression and anxiety in patients with treatment-resistant OCD. Further sham-controlled studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Research in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Major Depression)
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