Special Issue "Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chung-Chiun Liu (Website)

Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Electronics Design Center, Bingham 112, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7217, USA
Phone: +216-368-2935
Interests: electrochemical biosensors; enzymatic biosensors; microfabrication processing, nano-metallic biosensor catalysts; single use; disposable biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advancements in biosensor technology in recent years, combined with nano-catalysts, wireless communication, and micro-fabrication processing have led to new innovations in health care around the world. Interestingly, electrochemical based devices are one of the core technologies in biomedical sensors.

Responding to current needs and bringing awareness of this critical and timely endeavor, this Journal, Biosensors, plans to prepare a Special Issue on Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors which is devoted to the recent advancement of these technologies and their associated elements, such as light weight power sources, wireless communication techniques and others. Electrochemical based biomedical sensors, including enzymatic and whole cell biosensors, will be covered in this Special Issue. Also articles relating to in vivo and in vitro biomedical sensors produced by micro-fabrication processes and other means will be solicited for this issue. A further topic to be included and assessed is micro-catalysts and micro-structures which can enhance the sensor performance. Finally, detections of new and important biomarkers in non-invasive physiological medium, such as breath, saliva and urine are of particular interest.

We look forward to receiving your valuable contributions.

Prof. Dr. Chung-Chiun Liu
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • electrochemical based biosensors
  • wireless communication
  • micro-fabrication
  • nano-catalysts
  • nano-structures
  • in vivo biosensors
  • in vitro biosensors

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Trimetallic (Aurod-Pdshell-Ptcluster) Catalyst Used as Amperometric Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 461-471; doi:10.3390/bios4040461
Received: 2 July 2014 / Revised: 8 September 2014 / Accepted: 16 September 2014 / Published: 19 November 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bimetallic nanostructured core-shell structures are commonly used as catalysts in a wide variety of reactions. We surmised that the addition of an additional metal would potentially allow catalytic tailoring with the possibility of an increase in activity. Here a tri-metallic catalytic structure, [...] Read more.
Bimetallic nanostructured core-shell structures are commonly used as catalysts in a wide variety of reactions. We surmised that the addition of an additional metal would potentially allow catalytic tailoring with the possibility of an increase in activity. Here a tri-metallic catalytic structure, consisting of clustered catalytic Pt on the surface of a Pd shell supported on a rod shaped Au core was fabricated. The significance of the additional metallic component is shown by comparative electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) analysis results for the trimetallic Aurod-Pdshell-Ptcluster, bimetallic Aurod-Ptcluster and monometallic JM-Pt (used as a reference), which have respective ECSA values (cm2/mgPt) of 1883.0, 1371.7 and 879. The potential utility of the trimetallic catalysts was shown in a hydrogen peroxide sensing protocol, which showed the catalyst to have a sensitivity of 604 ìA/mMcm2 within a linear range of 0.0013–6.191 mM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Fabrication of Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Buckypaper Electrodes for Application in Glucose Biosensors
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 449-460; doi:10.3390/bios4040449
Received: 29 August 2014 / Revised: 30 September 2014 / Accepted: 29 October 2014 / Published: 11 November 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (541 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A highly sensitive glucose detection method was developed using functionalized carbon nanotube buckypaper as a free standing electrode in an electrochemical biosensor. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto various buckypaper samples in order to oxidize glucose resulting in a measureable current/voltage signal output [...] Read more.
A highly sensitive glucose detection method was developed using functionalized carbon nanotube buckypaper as a free standing electrode in an electrochemical biosensor. Glucose oxidase was immobilized onto various buckypaper samples in order to oxidize glucose resulting in a measureable current/voltage signal output of the biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry were utilized to determine the sensitivity of these buckypaper electrodes. Sensors of three different types of buckypaper were prepared and compared. These modified buckypaper electrode-based sensors showed much higher sensitivity to glucose compared to other electrochemical glucose sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 403-421; doi:10.3390/bios4040403
Received: 5 August 2014 / Revised: 11 October 2014 / Accepted: 17 October 2014 / Published: 3 November 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (921 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V [...] Read more.
Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl). The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A “reagentless” biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10–150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1) of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13) for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Detection of the Inflammation Biomarker C-Reactive Protein in Serum Samples: Towards an Optimal Biosensor Formula
Biosensors 2014, 4(4), 340-357; doi:10.3390/bios4040340
Received: 16 July 2014 / Revised: 4 September 2014 / Accepted: 16 September 2014 / Published: 3 October 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (877 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based [...] Read more.
The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working electrode sensor was developed, and the types of electrode printing inks and ink curing techniques were then optimized. The electrodes with the best performance parameters were then employed for the construction of an immunosensor for CRP by immobilizing anti-human CRP antibody on the working electrode surface. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was then constructed after sample addition by using anti-human CRP antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The signal was generated by the addition of a mediator/substrate system comprised of 3,3,5',5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Measurements were conducted using chronoamperometry at −200 mV against an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A CRP limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 ng·mL1 was achieved in spiked serum samples, and performance agreement was obtained with reference to a commercial ELISA kit. The developed CRP immunosensor was able to detect a diagnostically relevant range of the biomarker in serum without the need for signal amplification using nanoparticles, paving the way for future development on a cardiac panel electrochemical point-of-care diagnostic device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Biosensors with Built-In Biomolecular Logic Gates for Practical Applications
Biosensors 2014, 4(3), 273-300; doi:10.3390/bios4030273
Received: 3 July 2014 / Revised: 15 August 2014 / Accepted: 22 August 2014 / Published: 27 August 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Molecular logic gates, designs constructed with biological and chemical molecules, have emerged as an alternative computing approach to silicon-based logic operations. These molecular computers are capable of receiving and integrating multiple stimuli of biochemical significance to generate a definitive output, opening a [...] Read more.
Molecular logic gates, designs constructed with biological and chemical molecules, have emerged as an alternative computing approach to silicon-based logic operations. These molecular computers are capable of receiving and integrating multiple stimuli of biochemical significance to generate a definitive output, opening a new research avenue to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics which demand handling of complex factors and precise control. In molecularly gated devices, Boolean logic computations can be activated by specific inputs and accurately processed via bio-recognition, bio-catalysis, and selective chemical reactions. In this review, we survey recent advances of the molecular logic approaches to practical applications of biosensors, including designs constructed with proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, nanomaterials, and organic compounds, as well as the research avenues for future development of digitally operating “sense and act” schemes that logically process biochemical signals through networked circuits to implement intelligent control systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)
Open AccessReview Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Ferroceneboronic Acid and Its Derivatives: A Review
Biosensors 2014, 4(3), 243-256; doi:10.3390/bios4030243
Received: 9 June 2014 / Revised: 3 July 2014 / Accepted: 25 July 2014 / Published: 30 July 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (645 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We review recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic acid (FcBA) and ferrocene (Fc)-modified boronic acids. These compounds can be used to construct electrochemical biosensors because they consist of a binding site (i.e., a boronic acid [...] Read more.
We review recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic acid (FcBA) and ferrocene (Fc)-modified boronic acids. These compounds can be used to construct electrochemical biosensors because they consist of a binding site (i.e., a boronic acid moiety) and an electrochemically active part (i.e., an Fc residue). By taking advantage of the unique properties of FcBA and its derivatives, electrochemical sensors sensitive to sugars, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fluoride (F) ions, and so forth have been widely studied. FcBA-based sugar sensors rely on the selective binding of FcBA to 1,2- or 1,3-diol residues of sugars through the formation of cyclic boronate ester bonds. The redox properties of FcBA-sugar adduct differ from those of free FcBA, which forms the basis of the electrochemical determination of sugars. Thus, non-enzymatic glucose sensors are now being actively studied using FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids as redox markers. Using a similar principle, HbA1c can be detected by FcBA-based electrochemical systems because it contains hydrocarbon chains on the polypeptide chain. HbA1c sensors are useful for monitoring blood glucose levels over the preceding 8–12 weeks. In addition, FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids have been used for the detection of F ions due to the selective binding of boronic acid to F ions. F-ion sensors may be useful alternatives to conventional ion-selective electrodes sensitive to F ion. Furthermore, FcBA derivatives have been studied to construct lectin; steroids; nucleotides; salicylic acid; and bacteria sensors. One of the limitations of FcBA-based sensors comes from the fact that FcBA derivatives are added in sample solutions as reagents. FcBA derivatives should be immobilized on the surface of electrodes for developing reagentless sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical and Biomedical Sensors)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Biosensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
biosensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Biosensors
Back to Top