Special Issue "Impact of Nanobiotechnology (Nanomedicine) on the Future of Medicine: The Road toward Precision Medicine"

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shaker A. Mousa

The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 1 Discovery Drive (Room 238), Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +518-694-7397
Fax: +1 518-694 7567
Interests: pharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals, and diagnostics; nanomedicine; cardiovascular diseases; neurological disorders; hematology and oncology; biosimilar and nanosimilar; angiogenesis, inflammation, thrombosis, integrin and cell adhesion molecules; target identification, molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways; preclinical, clinical, marketing and post marketing studies; regulatory and ethical issues

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Evidence from the scientific and medical communities has demonstrated the potential impact of nanotechnology/biotechnology and nanomedicine on the improved management of cancer and other disorders, in terms of early diagnosis and targeted therapy, leading to significant progress in accelerating precision medicine applications. The utilization of nanobiotechnology for the development of novel targeted nano-carrier systems has the potential to offer improved biomedicines (small molecule, peptide, and genes) delivery through improved pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety profiles. Targeted delivery of drug-incorporated nanoparticles, through conjugation of tumor-specific cell surface markers, such as tumor-specific antibodies or ligands, could enhance the efficacy and safety of the anti-cancer drug. Additionally, multifunctional characteristics of the Nano-carrier system would allow for simultaneous imaging of various types of cancers/microenvironment, targeted drug delivery (Therapeutics) along with monitoring (Thera nostics).

The scope of this Special Issue is to cover recent progress in nanotechnology/biotechnology as it relates to nanomedicine, targeted delivery of medicines and biomedicines, diagnostics. A key aim is to bring latest advances of various nanomedicine approaches for the detection and treatment of various types of organ specific diseases, vascular targeting, vaccine development, and the overall impact of Nanomedicine on advancing precision medicines. Additionally, this issue aims to cover nano nutraceuticals, nano cosmetics using single or combination of various bioactive compounds derived from natural products and impact on diseases prevention.

Prof. Dr. Shaker Mousa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • Biotechnology
  • Nanomedicines
  • Biomedicines
  • Precision medicine
  • Nano-pharmaceuticals
  • Nano-nutraceuticals
  • Nano-cosmetics
  • Imaging
  • Diagnostics
  • Theranostics
  • Disease prevention
  • Treatment, Early Detection

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Aflibercept Nanoformulation Inhibits VEGF Expression in Ocular In Vitro Model: A Preliminary Report
Biomedicines 2018, 6(3), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6030092
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 11 September 2018
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Abstract
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States, affecting approximately 11 million patients. AMD is caused primarily by an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In recent years, aflibercept injections have been used to
[...] Read more.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States, affecting approximately 11 million patients. AMD is caused primarily by an upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In recent years, aflibercept injections have been used to combat VEGF. However, this treatment requires frequent intravitreal injections, leading to low patient compliance and several adverse side effects including scarring, increased intraocular pressure, and retinal detachment. Polymeric nanoparticles have demonstrated the ability to deliver a sustained release of drug, thereby reducing the necessary injection frequency. Aflibercept (AFL) was encapsulated in poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) via double emulsion diffusion. Scanning electron microscopy showed the NPs were spherical and dynamic light scattering demonstrated that they were uniformly distributed (PDI < 1). The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading were 75.76% and 7.76% respectively. In vitro release studies showed a sustained release of drug; 75% of drug was released by the NPs in seven days compared to the full payload released in 24 h by the AFL solution. Future ocular in vivo studies are needed to confirm the biological effects of the NPs. Preliminary studies of the proposed aflibercept NPs demonstrated high encapsulation efficiency, a sustained drug release profile, and ideal physical characteristics for AMD treatment. This drug delivery system is an excellent candidate for further characterization using an ocular neovascularization in vivo model. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Assisted Tip Sonication Approach for Graphene Synthesis in Aqueous Dispersion
Biomedicines 2018, 6(2), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6020063
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 19 May 2018 / Accepted: 20 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
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Abstract
Graphene (G) is a newcomer material that holds promising properties for many applications. The production of high quality G with a good yield is a long-standing goal for many researchers. This work emphasizes synthesis of dispersed graphene nanoplatelets (DGP) through aqueous dispersion technique
[...] Read more.
Graphene (G) is a newcomer material that holds promising properties for many applications. The production of high quality G with a good yield is a long-standing goal for many researchers. This work emphasizes synthesis of dispersed graphene nanoplatelets (DGP) through aqueous dispersion technique in surfactant/water solution with the aid of tip sonication. A chemical method was also used to prepare graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for comparison. Elemental analysis revealed the C:O ratio to be 12:1 for DGP but much lower for other graphene structures. Optical characterization of DGP, GO and RGO with UV and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the ideal structure of DGP. Moreover, X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the amorphous structure of DGP. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging showed that DGP was composed of a few flat layers, unlike the wrinkled and partially bent multilayered G. Topological study of the DGP surface with scanning electron microscope (SEM) depicted its rough surface with (ra) value of 35 nm, as revealed using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Electrochemical measurements confirmed the higher conductivity of DGP over graphene prepared by chemical method due to lack of structural defects. Its perfect structure facilitates the mobility of charge carriers that makes it preferable in optoelectronic applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Comparative Therapeutic Effects of Plant-Extract Synthesized and Traditionally Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles on Alcohol-Induced Inflammatory Activity in SH-SY5Y Cells In Vitro
Biomedicines 2017, 5(4), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines5040070
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 4 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 15 December 2017
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Abstract
The present study describes potential beneficial and adverse effects of plant-extract synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on ethanol toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Although kudzu root extract (K), edible-gum extract (G), alone or in combination (KG), reduced Au3+ into AuNPs, the extract’s composition and
[...] Read more.
The present study describes potential beneficial and adverse effects of plant-extract synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on ethanol toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Although kudzu root extract (K), edible-gum extract (G), alone or in combination (KG), reduced Au3+ into AuNPs, the extract’s composition and the reaction temperature determined their size (AuNPKG(90<50<37) << AuNPK (90,50<37) < AuNPG (90<50); the subscript KG, K, or G is extract identification and numerical vales are reaction temperature in Celsius) and biological properties (AuNPKG (90,50>37) << AuNPK (90,50>37) < AuNPG (90,50)). The surface of each AuNP contained the extract’s active ingredients, that were analyzed and confirmed using laser desorption ionization (LDI)) and low-matrix laser desorption-ionization (LMALDI). AuNPKG-50 was (i) least toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, but most effective in suppressing the adverse effects of ethanol on SH-SY5Y cells, and (ii) more effective than a combination of free kudzu and gum extracts. The beneficial and adverse effects of AuNPs may have been modified by the formation of proteins corona. This study provides a proof of concept for possible application of plant-extract synthesized AuNPs in mitigating ethanol toxicity. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Pathogens and Their Effect on Exosome Biogenesis and Composition
Biomedicines 2018, 6(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6030079
Received: 25 May 2018 / Revised: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
Exosomes are nanosized membrane microvesicles (30–100 nm) that have the capability to communicate intercellularly and transport cell components (i.e., miRNA, mRNA, proteins and DNA). Exosomes are found in nearly every cell type (i.e., mast cells, dendritic, tumor, and macrophages). There have been many
[...] Read more.
Exosomes are nanosized membrane microvesicles (30–100 nm) that have the capability to communicate intercellularly and transport cell components (i.e., miRNA, mRNA, proteins and DNA). Exosomes are found in nearly every cell type (i.e., mast cells, dendritic, tumor, and macrophages). There have been many studies that have shown the importance of exosome function as well as their unique packaging and targeting abilities. These characteristics make exosomes ideal candidates to act as biomarkers and therapeutics for disease. We will discuss the biogenesis, composition, and relationship of exosomes with non-viral microbial infections including gram-negative bacteria, gram-positive bacteria, Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi. Full article
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Open AccessReview The Local Atomic Structure of Colloidal Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Theranostics in Oncology
Biomedicines 2018, 6(3), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines6030078
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 15 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
The paper contains an overview of modern spectroscopic methods for studying the local atomic structure of superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on iron oxide (SPIONs), which are an important class of materials promising for theranostics in oncology. Practically important properties of small and ultra small
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The paper contains an overview of modern spectroscopic methods for studying the local atomic structure of superparamagnetic nanoparticles based on iron oxide (SPIONs), which are an important class of materials promising for theranostics in oncology. Practically important properties of small and ultra small nanoparticles are determined primarily by their shape, size, and features of the local atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures, for the study of which the standard characterization methods developed for macroscopic materials are not optimal. The paper analyzes results of the studies of SPIONs local atomic structure carried out by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at synchrotron radiation sources and Mössbauer spectroscopy during the last decade. Full article
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