Special Issue "Energy Meteorology"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology and Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Richard Müller

German Meteorological Service CM-SAF, Frankfurter Straße 135, 63067 Offenbach, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +49 (0) 69 8062 4955
Interests: remote sensing of surface radiation; clouds and aerosols; sensor calibration; methods for "merging" in-situ data with remote sensing data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Energy Meteorology is an increasing field of research, interfacing renewable energy and atmospheric physics. Atmospheric physics is needed for the assessment and forecasting of the power output from solar and wind energy systems & mdash; and thus for the planning, monitoring, and efficient operation of these systems. Climatological data are usually used for the assessment of solar and wind energy resources, whereas near real time data and forecast of atmospheric variables are needed for the prediction of fluctuating power outputs. Thus, Energy Meteorology covers a wide range of methods and data.

Articles addressing methods dealing with the estimation, retrieval, or forecast of atmospheric variables relevant for renewables are welcome.
Methods can include:
- remote sensing, kriging and data fusion of atmospheric variables
- numerical weather prediction
- atmospheric motion vectors
- new observation strategies/systems
- data assimilation

The link of the methods and the derived data to solar and wind energy applications should be clearly demonstrated and discussed in the articles.

Dr. Richard Müller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Study on Extension of Standard Meteorological Data for Cities in South Korea Using ISO 15927-4
Atmosphere 2017, 8(11), 220; doi:10.3390/atmos8110220
Received: 18 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 3 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
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Abstract
Accurate standard meteorological data sets for each city are essential elements to assess and analyze high-performance buildings quantitatively in order to ensure that they comply with energy saving policies of the nation. ECO2, which is an assessment program of building energy in Korea,
[...] Read more.
Accurate standard meteorological data sets for each city are essential elements to assess and analyze high-performance buildings quantitatively in order to ensure that they comply with energy saving policies of the nation. ECO2, which is an assessment program of building energy in Korea, has employed meteorological data of the closest city to the target location from 13 urban meteorological data references; the employment of this program has demonstrated the ability to reflect climatic differences between cities. The present study expanded urban meteorological data to ISO TRY (International Organization for Standard Test Reference Year), an international standard methodology that can calculate the data in a relatively simple manner using observed data in Korea, as much as possible in order to reflect meteorological data, including the air temperature relevant for heating and cooling energy as well as solar radiation (cooling/heating energy) for each city, that affected the assessment of building energy the most. In the present study, existing data is expanded to a show the standard meteorological data of 66 cities that can be put into the Korean assessment program (ECO2). This data considered valid meteorological data (minimum statistical period, air temperature, relative humidity, wind, and solar radiation, etc.) among manned and unmanned observational data obtained from 479 locations from 2001 to 2010. For cities other than the 66 aforementioned cities, zoning was conducted to separate cities that had and did not have the standard meteorological data using a cumulative temperature density graph. In this way, meteorological data can be available in all cities, which will enable more accurate simulation assessments on building energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Meteorology)
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Open AccessArticle Regional Impact Assessment of Monsoon Variability on Wind Power Availability and Optimization in Asia
Atmosphere 2017, 8(11), 219; doi:10.3390/atmos8110219
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 13 November 2017
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Abstract
Recent developments have emphasized the global impacts of climate change and have renewed commitments in renewable energy and energy meteorology. Wind energy depends largely on prevailing meteorological conditions on both local and large scales, thus, wind power optimization should aid its assessment and
[...] Read more.
Recent developments have emphasized the global impacts of climate change and have renewed commitments in renewable energy and energy meteorology. Wind energy depends largely on prevailing meteorological conditions on both local and large scales, thus, wind power optimization should aid its assessment and development. This study uses ERA-Interim daily data from 1979 to 2014 to investigate the impact of the East Asian Monsoon on wind power in Asia. Wind power increase in the Bay of Bengal region as wind vectors strengthened from winter (DJF, December-January-February) to summer (JJA, June-July-August), while the predominant direction shifted to southwesterly. The influence of the South China Sea on South East Asia resulted in increased wind power that peaked in winter. Probability distribution functions for four sub-regions revealed higher probabilities of relatively lower wind speeds in JJA, except for the South East region, where most probable wind speeds were reached in winter. The capacity factor also varied by region and by season. Power generation was lowest in JJA for all the regions except the South West. The South East region also had the highest power generated over the domain. This variation of wind power impacts the amount of energy that must be supplied by non-wind sources, termed Demand Net Wind (DNW). Knowledge of DNW fluctuations thus becomes an important consideration for optimization of power plants, grid networking and reliability, and energy markets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Meteorology)
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