Special Issue "Sub- and Unconscious Information Processing in the Human Brain"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Peter Walla

1. Head of Psychology Department, Webster Vienna Private University, Palais Wenkheim in 1020 Vienna, Austria
2. Conjoint Professor at the School of Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan 2308 NSW, Newcastle, Australia
3. Senior Research Fellow at the Vienna University, Faculty of Psychology, Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: non-conscious brain processes; affective and cognitive processing; emotion; memory; olfaction; EEG; startle reflex modulation; MEG; brain imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Clearly, there is growing interest in non-conscious brain processes in the human brain. We all know that initial interest started centuries ago, but with the advent of modern technologies that give us objective access to processes below the level of awareness, the endeavor to better understand our non-conscious mind has gained a totally new perspective. There is a strong need for all scholars to do as much as we can to contribute to that endeavor, because the non-conscious mind still has largely unknown effects on basically all kinds of human behavior, in both clinical and non-clinical environments, in political and economical, as well as any other social settings.

With biggest pleasure I am thus asking for contributions to this Special Issue on non-conscious brain processes, with a focus on the distinction between sub- and unconscious processes, which are both non-conscious. Unconscious processes do not have the potential to enter the stream of consciousness, while sub-conscious processes do. If you feel like you can contribute to this fascinating topic, please do not hesitate to submit your piece to Applied Sciences, which is the perfect open access platform for this purpose.

Prof. Dr. Peter Walla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sub-conscious
  • un-conscious
  • cognitive processes
  • affective processes
  • objective measures
  • brain imaging
  • startle reflex modulation
  • neurobiology
  • neuroconsulting

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Conscious and Non-Conscious Measures of Emotion: Do They Vary with Frequency of Pornography Use?
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(5), 493; doi:10.3390/app7050493
Received: 1 March 2017 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
PDF Full-text (1422 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Increased pornography use has been a feature of contemporary human society, with technological advances allowing for high speed internet and relative ease of access via a multitude of wireless devices. Does increased pornography exposure alter general emotion processing? Research in the area of
[...] Read more.
Increased pornography use has been a feature of contemporary human society, with technological advances allowing for high speed internet and relative ease of access via a multitude of wireless devices. Does increased pornography exposure alter general emotion processing? Research in the area of pornography use is heavily reliant on conscious self-report measures. However, increasing knowledge indicates that attitudes and emotions are extensively processed on a non-conscious level prior to conscious appraisal. Hence, this exploratory study aimed to investigate whether frequency of pornography use has an impact on non-conscious and/or conscious emotion processes. Participants (N = 52) who reported viewing various amounts of pornography were presented with emotion inducing images. Brain Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded and Startle Reflex Modulation (SRM) was applied to determine non-conscious emotion processes. Explicit valence and arousal ratings for each image presented were also taken to determine conscious emotion effects. Conscious explicit ratings revealed significant differences with respect to “Erotic” and “Pleasant” valence (pleasantness) ratings depending on pornography use. SRM showed effects approaching significance and ERPs showed changes in frontal and parietal regions of the brain in relation to “Unpleasant” and “Violent” emotion picture categories, which did not correlate with differences seen in the explicit ratings. Findings suggest that increased pornography use appears to have an influence on the brain’s non-conscious responses to emotion-inducing stimuli which was not shown by explicit self-report. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sub- and Unconscious Information Processing in the Human Brain)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview The Role of the Cerebellum in Unconscious and Conscious Processing of Emotions: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(5), 521; doi:10.3390/app7050521
Received: 30 January 2017 / Revised: 9 May 2017 / Accepted: 12 May 2017 / Published: 17 May 2017
PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studies from the past three decades have demonstrated that there is cerebellar involvement in the emotional domain. Emotional processing in humans requires both unconscious and conscious mechanisms. A significant amount of evidence indicates that the cerebellum is one of the cerebral structures that
[...] Read more.
Studies from the past three decades have demonstrated that there is cerebellar involvement in the emotional domain. Emotional processing in humans requires both unconscious and conscious mechanisms. A significant amount of evidence indicates that the cerebellum is one of the cerebral structures that subserve emotional processing, although conflicting data has been reported on its function in unconscious and conscious mechanisms. This review discusses the available clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological data on this issue. We also propose a model in which the cerebellum acts as a mediator between the internal state and external environment for the unconscious and conscious levels of emotional processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sub- and Unconscious Information Processing in the Human Brain)
Open AccessReview Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Conscious and Non-Conscious Components of the Mind
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(4), 349; doi:10.3390/app7040349
Received: 31 January 2017 / Revised: 29 March 2017 / Accepted: 30 March 2017 / Published: 1 April 2017
PDF Full-text (447 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present review is to investigate previous studies concerning the effects of meditation and dispositional mindfulness on conscious and implicit or non-conscious attitudes. First we present a brief perspective on conscious and non-conscious states of mind. Then we introduce the
[...] Read more.
The aim of the present review is to investigate previous studies concerning the effects of meditation and dispositional mindfulness on conscious and implicit or non-conscious attitudes. First we present a brief perspective on conscious and non-conscious states of mind. Then we introduce the fundamental bases of mindfulness meditation. Third we review studies on dispositional mindfulness and meditation that employed either direct or indirect measures to assess explicit and implicit attitudes. Finally, we briefly present how meditation has been associated with the psychotherapeutic practice of psychoanalysis and, hence, as a therapeutic technique to access the unconscious. Until now, few studies have investigated the impact of meditation on non-conscious states of mind and personality; nevertheless, both scientific studies involving implicit measures and reflections from psychotherapy have underlined the importance of meditation in promoting psychological well-being, leading to de-automatization of automatic patterns of responding and to higher levels of self-awareness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sub- and Unconscious Information Processing in the Human Brain)
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessConcept Paper An Heuristic Framework for Non-Conscious Reasoning
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(11), 1161; doi:10.3390/app7111161
Received: 12 October 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 12 November 2017
PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Human non-conscious reasoning is one of the most successful procedures evolved for the purposes of solving everyday problems in an efficient way. This is why the field of artificial intelligence should analyze, formalize and emulate the multiple ways of non-conscious reasoning with the
[...] Read more.
Human non-conscious reasoning is one of the most successful procedures evolved for the purposes of solving everyday problems in an efficient way. This is why the field of artificial intelligence should analyze, formalize and emulate the multiple ways of non-conscious reasoning with the purpose of applying them in human problem solving tasks, like medical diagnostics and treatments, educational diagnostics and intervention, organizational and political decision making, artificial intelligence knowledge based systems and neurocomputers, automatic control systems and similar devices for aiding people in the problem-solving process. In this paper, a heuristic framework for those non-conscious ways of reasoning is presented based on neurocognitive representations, heuristics, and fuzzy sets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sub- and Unconscious Information Processing in the Human Brain)
Back to Top