Special Issue "Biocompatible Materials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giovanni Vozzi

Research Center “E. Piaggio” and Department of Ingegneria dell’Informazione, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: Design of new functionalization methodologies of biomaterials; Mechanical, chemical and cell characterization of novel biomaterials; Development of new micro- and nano-fabrication techniques; Fabrication of bioreactors; Development of in-silico cell models; Acquisition and processing of electromyographic signal; Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine; Biofabrication

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce an upcoming Special Issue focusing on biocompatible materials. It my pleasure to invite you and members of your research team to submit an article for this Special Issue.

Biocompatible material is now defined as a substance, or a combination of substances, which has been engineered and processed to interact with components of living systems with an appropriate response in a specific application.

We invite authors to contribute original research or reviews describing detailed experimental studies, investigations and novel developments dealing with important issues facing the synthesis, design, fabrication and characterization of biocompatible material for clinical applications, including, but without being limited to diagnosis, therapies, regenerative medicine and implantable devices.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Vozzi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • Medical Devices
  • Drug Delivery
  • Medical Devices
  • Diagnostic Systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Cartilage Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Silica Nonwoven Fabrics
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(8), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8081398
Received: 24 June 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 18 August 2018
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Abstract
In cartilage tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds provide native extracellular matrix (ECM) environments that induce tissue ingrowth and ECM deposition for in vitro and in vivo tissue regeneration. In this report, we investigated 3D silica nonwoven fabrics (Cellbed®) as a scaffold
[...] Read more.
In cartilage tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds provide native extracellular matrix (ECM) environments that induce tissue ingrowth and ECM deposition for in vitro and in vivo tissue regeneration. In this report, we investigated 3D silica nonwoven fabrics (Cellbed®) as a scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cartilage tissue engineering applications. The unique, highly porous microstructure of 3D silica fabrics allows for immediate cell infiltration for tissue repair and orientation of cell–cell interaction. It is expected that the morphological similarity of silica fibers to that of fibrillar ECM contributes to the functionalization of cells. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured in 3D silica fabrics, and chondrogenic differentiation was induced by culture in chondrogenic differentiation medium. The characteristics of chondrogenic differentiation including cellular growth, ECM deposition of glycosaminoglycan and collagen, and gene expression were evaluated. Because of the highly interconnected network structure, stiffness, and permeability of the 3D silica fabrics, the level of chondrogenesis observed in MSCs seeded within was comparable to that observed in MSCs maintained on atelocollagen gels, which are widely used to study the chondrogenesis of MSCs in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that 3D silica nonwoven fabrics are a promising scaffold for the regeneration of articular cartilage defects using MSCs, showing the particular importance of high elasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Other

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Open AccessBrief Report 3D Printed Antibacterial Prostheses
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1651; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091651
Received: 21 July 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
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Abstract
The purpose of the current investigation was two-fold: (i) to describe the development of 3D printed prostheses using antibacterial filaments and (ii) to verify the antibacterial properties of the 3D printed prostheses. Three-dimensional printed finger prostheses were manufactured using PLACTIVETM antibacterial 3D
[...] Read more.
The purpose of the current investigation was two-fold: (i) to describe the development of 3D printed prostheses using antibacterial filaments and (ii) to verify the antibacterial properties of the 3D printed prostheses. Three-dimensional printed finger prostheses were manufactured using PLACTIVETM antibacterial 3D printing filaments. Two adults with left index finger amputations at the proximal phalanx were fitted with a customized 3D printed finger prosthesis manufactured with an antibacterial filament. The manual gross dexterity was assessed during the Box and Block Test. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0). Bacterial analysis of the 3D printed prostheses was performed by two independent laboratories against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli (ISO 22196). Two customized 3D printed partial finger prostheses were manufactured using a 3D printed antibacterial filament. The bacterial analysis showed that PLACTIVETM with 1% antibacterial nanoparticles additives was up to 99.99% effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The manual gross dexterity assessed was improved after using the 3D printed partial finger prosthesis. The research subjects indicated that they were “quite satisfied” to “very satisfied” with the 3D printed partial finger prosthesis. The present investigation showed that the antibacterial 3D printed filament can be used for the development of functional and effective antibacterial finger prostheses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

The type of paper: Article
Tentative title: GELATIN AND GLYCERINE-BASED BIOADHESIVE VAGINAL HYDROGEL
Author: Roberta Cassano, Adriana Trapani, Delia Mandracchia, Sonia Trombino
Affiliation: Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Università della Calabria, Arcavacata di Rende, Cosenza, Italy; Department of Pharmacy, Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo, Bari, Italy
Abstract: The aim of this work was the preparation and characterization of an hydrogel based on gelatin and glycerine, useful as a carrier for site specific release of benzydamine, a topical anti-inflammatory drug, able to attenuate the inflammatory process typical of the vaginal infection. The hydrogel obtained has been characterized through electronic scanning microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, due to the precursors properties the hydrogel exhibits a relevant mucoadhesive activity. Its swelling degree was assessed by studies conducted at two different pH and at defined time intervals. In particular, phosphate buffers were used at pH 6.6, to mimic the typical conditions of infectious diseases at the vaginal level, and pH 4.6, to simulate the physiological environment. The obtained results revealed that the hydrogel swells well at both pHs. Release studies conducted at both pathological and physiological pHs have shown that benzydamine is released at the level of the vaginal mucosa in a slow and gradual manner. These results supported the hypothesis of the hydrogel use for the site-specific release of benzydamine in the vaginal mucosa.

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