Special Issue "Adapting Crop Productivity to Climate Change"

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Karine Chenu

Centre for Plant Science, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, 306 Carmody Road, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crop ecophysiology; crop adaptation; crop modelling; climate change; drought, heat; genotype x environment interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the world population growing quickly, the demand for staple foods is continuously increasing. The challenge of meeting this demand is increased by climate change, which has the potential to greatly impact crops. While historical weather records show recent changes in CO2, temperature and rainfall patterns, further changes are projected by climate models for future conditions. In particular, the likely enhancement of the increased occurrence of extreme climate is expected to have multiple impacts on crops growth and development, ultimately affecting crop yields. Finding timely strategies to adapt crop productivity to climate change is of crucial importance.

This Special Issue welcomes reviews, perspectives, case studies, and key findings on projected impacts of climate change on crop productivity, and approaches to maintain and increase yield despite global warming.

Dr. Karine Chenu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • crop
  • yield
  • climate change
  • global warming
  • abiotic stress
  • adaptation
  • mitigation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Validation of a Process-Based Agro-Ecosystem Model (Agro-IBIS) for Maize in Xinjiang, Northwest China
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 26 February 2018 / Accepted: 27 February 2018 / Published: 10 March 2018
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Abstract
Agricultural oasis expansion and intensive management practices have occurred in arid and semiarid regions of China during the last few decades. Accordingly, regional carbon and water budgets have been profoundly impacted by agroecosystems in these regions. Therefore, study on the methods used to
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Agricultural oasis expansion and intensive management practices have occurred in arid and semiarid regions of China during the last few decades. Accordingly, regional carbon and water budgets have been profoundly impacted by agroecosystems in these regions. Therefore, study on the methods used to accurately estimate energy, water, and carbon exchanges is becoming increasingly important. Process-based models can represent the complex processes between land and atmosphere among agricultural ecosystems. However, before the models can be applied they must be validated under different environmental and climatic conditions. In this study, a process-based agricultural ecosystem model (Agro-IBIS) was validated for maize crops using 3 years of soil and biometric measurements at Wulanwusu agrometeorological site (WAS) located in the Shihezi oasis in Xinjiang, northwest China. The model satisfactorily represented leaf area index (LAI) during the growing season, simulating its peak values within the magnitude of 0–10%. The total biomass carbon was overestimated by 15%, 8%, and 16% in 2004, 2005, and 2006, respectively. The model satisfactorily simulated the soil temperature (0–10 cm) and volumetric water content (VWC) (0–25 cm) of farmland during the growing season. However, it overestimated soil temperature approximately by 4 °C and VWC by 15–30% during the winter, coinciding with the period of no vegetation cover in Xinjiang. Overall, the results indicate that the model could represent crop growth, and seems to be applicable in multiple sites in arid oases agroecosystems of Xinjiang. Future application of the model will impose more comprehensive validation using eddy covariance flux data, and consider including dynamics of crop residue and improving characterization of the final stage of leaf development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adapting Crop Productivity to Climate Change)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Impact of High Temperature and Drought Stresses on Chickpea Production
Agronomy 2018, 8(8), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy8080145
Received: 29 June 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 12 August 2018
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Abstract
Global climate change has caused severe crop yield losses worldwide and is endangering food security in the future. The impact of climate change on food production is high in Australia and globally. Climate change is projected to have a negative impact on crop
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Global climate change has caused severe crop yield losses worldwide and is endangering food security in the future. The impact of climate change on food production is high in Australia and globally. Climate change is projected to have a negative impact on crop production. Chickpea is a cool season legume crop mostly grown on residual soil moisture. High temperature and terminal drought are common in different regions of chickpea production with varying intensities and frequencies. Therefore, stable chickpea production will depend on the release of new cultivars with improved adaptation to major events such as drought and high temperature. Recent progress in chickpea breeding has increased the efficiency of assessing genetic diversity in germplasm collections. This review provides an overview of the integration of new approaches and tools into breeding programs and their impact on the development of stress tolerance in chickpea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adapting Crop Productivity to Climate Change)
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Open AccessReview Cropping Systems and Climate Change in Humid Subtropical Environments
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 10 February 2018 / Published: 14 February 2018
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Abstract
In the future, climate change will challenge food security by threatening crop production. Humid subtropical regions play an important role in global food security, with crop rotations often including wheat (winter crop) and soybean and maize (summer crops). Over the last 30 years,
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In the future, climate change will challenge food security by threatening crop production. Humid subtropical regions play an important role in global food security, with crop rotations often including wheat (winter crop) and soybean and maize (summer crops). Over the last 30 years, the humid subtropics in the Northern Hemisphere have experienced a stronger warming trend than in the Southern Hemisphere, and the trend is projected to continue throughout the mid- and end of century. Past rainfall trends range, from increases up to 4% per decade in Southeast China to −3% decadal decline in East Australia; a similar trend is projected in the future. Climate change impact studies suggest that by the middle and end of the century, wheat yields may not change, or they will increase up to 17%. Soybean yields will increase between 3% and 41%, while maize yields will increase by 30% or decline by −40%. These wide-ranging climate change impacts are partly due to the region-specific projections, but also due to different global climate models, climate change scenarios, single-model uncertainties, and cropping system assumptions, making it difficult to make conclusions from these impact studies and develop adaptation strategies. Additionally, most of the crop models used in these studies do not include major common stresses in this environment, such as heat, frost, excess water, pests, and diseases. Standard protocols and impact assessments across the humid subtropical regions are needed to understand climate change impacts and prepare for adaptation strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adapting Crop Productivity to Climate Change)
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