Special Issue "Urban Landscape Degradation and Restoration"

A special issue of Urban Science (ISSN 2413-8851).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexander Buyantuev

Department of Geography and Planning, College of Arts and Science, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: landscape ecology; urbanization and urban ecology; phenology; grassland ecosystems; remote sensing; land use/cover change
Guest Editor
Dr. Chi Xu

School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: landscape ecology; ecosystem resilience; macroecology; urban ecology
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Junxiang Li

Professor of Ecological and Environmental Sciences, East China Normal University, 3663 Zhongshan Bei Road, Shanghai, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban remote sensing; urban ecology; landscape ecology; urban biodiversity; urban structure and functions; urban ecosystem services
Guest Editor
Dr. Qingxu Huang

Center for Human-Environment System Sustainability (CHESS), State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology (ESPRE), Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: land use/cover change modeling; remote sensing of environment; landscape ecology; urbanization and its impacts; urban ecosystem services; urban sustainability
Guest Editor
Dr. Ganlin Huang

Center for Human-Environment System Sustainability (CHESS), State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology (ESPRE), Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban green space; urban heat island; urban sustainability; ecosystem services and human well-being; landscape sustainability; environmental justice

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urban regions continue to grow worldwide and so do environmental problems brought about by urbanization. Degradation of urban landscapes due to increasing air, water, soil and thermal pollution, and loss of biodiversity have become a matter of concern because of its deleterious effects on ecological processes and human health. A better understanding of urban landscape degradation is required for developing mitigation strategies and restoring important ecosystem services provided by urban landscapes. The special issue seeks manuscripts improving our understanding of various aspects of environmental degradation of urban landscapes across the world, including such topics as pollution by particulate matter, soil contamination by heavy metals, carbon dioxide pollution, impacts of urban heat island on ecological processes and human health, mapping and quantification of urban landscape patterns and land cover changes, urban forests and green spaces. We endorse studies advancing applications of hierarchical patch dynamics paradigm, conducted across spatial and temporal scales. Papers considered for this issue can be categorized into several groups: (1) Theory and principles of urban landscape degradation assessments; (2) Modeling studies and development of indicators of urban landscape degradation; (3) Assessment of landscape degradation of urban regions and development of restoration strategies; (4) Studies assessing consequences of landscape degradation on ecosystems, social sustainability and human health; (5) Identification of novel pollutants, such as plastic nanoparticles, and overlooked ecological effects, such as nighttime lights, on urban ecosystems; (6) Cascading effects of urban landscape degradation on regional/global ecosystems; (7) Resilience and tipping points of urban systems associated with landscape degradation; (8) Restoration and rehabilitation of degraded urban landscapes.

Prof. Dr. Alexander Buyantuev
Dr. Chi Xu
Dr. Junxiang Li
Dr. Qingxu Huang
Dr. Ganlin Huang
Guest Editors

 
 
 
 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Urban Science is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use and land cover change
  • urbanization
  • urban ecology
  • urban sustainability
  • resilience
  • pollution
  • urban heat island
  • environmental monitoring
  • ecological indicators
  • ecological restoration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Land-Cover Change Analysis and Simulation in Conakry (Guinea), Using Hybrid Cellular-Automata and Markov Model
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2020039
Received: 11 February 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 15 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
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Abstract
In this study, land-cover change in the capital Conakry of Guinea was simulated using the integrated Cellular Automata and Markov model (CA-Markov) in the Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Historical land-cover change information was derived from 1986, 2000 and 2016
[...] Read more.
In this study, land-cover change in the capital Conakry of Guinea was simulated using the integrated Cellular Automata and Markov model (CA-Markov) in the Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Historical land-cover change information was derived from 1986, 2000 and 2016 Landsat data. Using the land-cover change maps of 1986 and 2000, the land-cover change map for 2016 was simulated based on the Markov model in IDRISSI software (Clark University, Worcester, MA, USA). The simulated result was compared with the 2016 land-cover map for validation using the Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC). The ROC result showed a very strong agreement between the two maps. From this result, the land-cover change map for 2025 was simulated using CA-Markov model. The result has indicated that the proportion of the urban area was 49% in 2016, and it is expected to increase to 52% by 2025, while vegetation will decrease from 35% in 2016 to 32% in 2025. This study suggests that the rapid land-cover change has been led by both rapid population growth and extreme poverty in rural areas, which will result in migration into Conakry. The results of this study will provide bases for assessing the sustainability and the management of the urban area and for taking actions to mitigate the degradation of the urban environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Landscape Degradation and Restoration)
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Open AccessArticle Intra-Urban Microclimate Effects on Phenology
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2010026
Received: 1 January 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
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Abstract
The urban heat island effect is commonly defined as the thermal differences between cooler rural and warmer urban areas, but it also refers to microclimatic differences within an urban area that arises from varied combinations of land cover related to different land uses.
[...] Read more.
The urban heat island effect is commonly defined as the thermal differences between cooler rural and warmer urban areas, but it also refers to microclimatic differences within an urban area that arises from varied combinations of land cover related to different land uses. Microclimatic variations should also produce intra-urban differences in vegetation phenophases, although few studies have investigated urban phenology. Most phenological studies are usually regional to continental in scale, predominantly tracking changes in start of season related to climate change. This study reports results of an exploratory analysis using TIMESAT (Lund University, Lund, Sweden) software and MODIS NDVI 250-m resolution data (Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA) to identify intra-urban differences in start of season for the City of Roanoke, Virginia. We compare these results to our in-situ temperature collection campaign. Additionally, we completed an in-situ start of season data collection by observing select tree species. Our results demonstrate that MODIS, processed by TIMESAT software, identified intra-urban start of season variations, and these variations are consistent with differing intra-urban microclimates and our in-situ start of season observations. Furthermore, results from such analyses can aid plans for increasing the urban tree canopy or in cultivating locations for urban agriculture—i.e., warmer areas with a longer growing season could accommodate warmer weather trees and crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Landscape Degradation and Restoration)
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Graphical abstract

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The Degraded Landscape in an Insular Space: Metropolitan Area of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain
Author:
Miguel Ángel Mejías Vera
Affiliation:
Regional Geographic Analysis Area, Department of Geography and History, Faculty of Humanities, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Abstract: On the island of Tenerife, built space has grown to such an extent that it is difficult to differentiate and delimit what is urban and what is not. This growth can be defined as expansive, very dispersed, of low density, and heterogeneous; however, it is very fragmented, irregular in terms of the form of its multiple classes, and diverse in terms of the proportional distribution of those classes. Thus, when we define the urban landscape, we cannot focus exclusively on a static delimitation, because the urban space is permeable and dynamic—it stretches and grows constantly. To conduct a study on urban degraded space, we must include the growing space in transition, which, a priori, leaves a footprint of greater degradation. It is in these spaces where planning must be focused on landscape policies in an urgent way. Within the fundamental objectives of urban sustainability lies the concept of compactness. This means giving spatial cohesion and homogeneity to the urban and peri-urban areas. However, in such a limited and fragmented territory as an insular space, these criteria are not always adequate. We need to know where to intervene. This research focuses on the following: First, analyzing, demarcating, characterizing and measuring the sealed landscape of existing and unsealed soil. Second, mapping and characterizing the degradation of the peri-urban landscape of the metropolitan area of Santa Cruz de Tenerife (67% of the island's resident population). To achieve these objectives, we will build an indicator whose objective is to know the percentage of soil sealed and not sealed per hectare of soil. Its subsequent characterization will show the different functions and state to evaluate the type and degree of deterioration of the landscape.
Keywords:
degraded landscape; peri-urban landscape; urban sprawl; soil sealing; green urbanism; geo-design

 

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