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Special Issue "Metabolomics in Mycotoxin Research"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rainer Schuhmacher

Center for Analytical Chemistry, Department for Agrobiotechnology (IFA-Tulln), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), 1180 Tulln, Austria
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics studies try to generate a (global) comparative snapshot of the metabolic state of a biological system under investigation with the aim to identify and relate changes in the metabolic network to the applied experimental conditions. Since most metabolomics studies follow this generic concept, the discipline is well suited to illuminate versatile topics such as mycotoxins from multiple perspectives.

In the field of mycotoxin research, the toolbox of metabolomics has already been successfully used for example to elucidate novel secondary metabolites of fungi, identify mycotoxin biomarkers, to study the metabolism of mycotoxins in plants and animals, to investigate defense mechanisms of plants against fungal attack or to probe changes in the metabolome of organisms which were exposed to mycotoxins / pathogenic fungi.

This topical issue is dedicated to metabolomics in mycotoxin research and intends to present state-of-the art research papers as well as review articles in the field. Articles may present novel metabolomics methods for mycotoxin research, focus on methodical aspects or describe applied metabolomics studies, which provide novel insight into any of the above mentioned mycotoxin related issues.

Dr. Rainer Schuhmacher
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel methods
  • Untargeted / targeted approaches
  • Plant pathology / physiology
  • Biomarker
  • Toxicology
  • Biotransformation
  • Secondary metabolism
  • Stress response
  • Chromatography
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Spectroscopy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Transcriptome Analysis of C. elegans Reveals Novel Targets for DON Cytotoxicity
Received: 28 April 2018 / Revised: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
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Abstract
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease in cereal crops. Ingestion of food contaminated with DON poses serious human health complications. However, the DON cytotoxicity has been mostly deduced from animal studies. In this
[...] Read more.
Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease in cereal crops. Ingestion of food contaminated with DON poses serious human health complications. However, the DON cytotoxicity has been mostly deduced from animal studies. In this study, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a tractable animal model to dissect the toxic effect of DON. Our results indicate that DON reduces the fecundity and lifespan of C. elegans. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis showed that DON upregulates innate immunity-related genes including C17H12.8 and K08D8.5 encoding PMK-1 (mitogen activated protein kinase-1)-regulated immune effectors, and F35E12.5 encoding a CUB-like domain-containing protein. Furthermore, our RNAseq data demonstrate that out of ~17,000 C. elegans genes, 313 are upregulated and 166 were downregulated by DON treatment. Among the DON-upregulated genes, several are ugt genes encoding UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGTs) which are known to be involved in chemical detoxification. The three upregulated genes, F52F10.4 (oac-32), C10H11.6 (ugt-26) and C10H11.4 (ugt-28) encoding the O-acyltransferase homolog, UGT26 and UGT 28, respectively, are shown to contribute to DON tolerance by a RNAi bacterial feeding experiment. The results of this study provide insights to the targets of DON cytotoxicity and potential mitigation measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Mycotoxin Research)
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Open AccessArticle Metabolites Identified during Varied Doses of Aspergillus Species in Zea mays Grains, and Their Correlation with Aflatoxin Levels
Received: 24 April 2018 / Revised: 30 April 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
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Abstract
Aflatoxin contamination is associated with the development of aflatoxigenic fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus on food grains. This study was aimed at investigating metabolites produced during fungal development on maize and their correlation with aflatoxin levels. Maize cobs were harvested
[...] Read more.
Aflatoxin contamination is associated with the development of aflatoxigenic fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus on food grains. This study was aimed at investigating metabolites produced during fungal development on maize and their correlation with aflatoxin levels. Maize cobs were harvested at R3 (milk), R4 (dough), and R5 (dent) stages of maturity. Individual kernels were inoculated in petri dishes with four doses of fungal spores. Fungal colonisation, metabolite profile, and aflatoxin levels were examined. Grain colonisation decreased with kernel maturity: milk-, dough-, and dent-stage kernels by approximately 100%, 60%, and 30% respectively. Aflatoxin levels increased with dose at dough and dent stages. Polar metabolites including alanine, proline, serine, valine, inositol, iso-leucine, sucrose, fructose, trehalose, turanose, mannitol, glycerol, arabitol, inositol, myo-inositol, and some intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA—also known as citric acid or Krebs cycle) were important for dose classification. Important non-polar metabolites included arachidic, palmitic, stearic, 3,4-xylylic, and margaric acids. Aflatoxin levels correlated with levels of several polar metabolites. The strongest positive and negative correlations were with arabitol (R = 0.48) and turanose and (R = −0.53), respectively. Several metabolites were interconnected with the TCA; interconnections of the metabolites with the TCA cycle varied depending upon the grain maturity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics in Mycotoxin Research)
Figures

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