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Special Issue "Sustainable Design and Construction"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Behzad Sodagar

Lincoln School of Architecture, Faculty of Art Architecture and Design, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln LN6 7TS, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)1522 83 7141
Interests: sustainable architecture; low energy building design; building performance analysis; post occupancy evaluation; user comfort and satisfraction; whole life cycle assessment; carbon foot-printing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This co-special issue, a joint initiative by Buildings and Sustainability Journals, brings together current thinking and research on how the construction industry could achieve a sustainable built environment in an innovative and cost effective way.  The special issue is a response to the growing concerns about environmental impacts of the built environment and the urgent need for identification and development of innovative strategies and solutions for reducing our ecological footprint.

The special issue argues that in order to achieve truly sustainable buildings we need to adopt a balanced view to address all aspects of sustainability namely social, economic and environmental sustainability. It also discusses how we may achieve best practice through a holistic approach that considers all stages of building procurement, from early design stage to end of life. Contributors from architecture, planning and engineering (both academia and practice) provide a wide-ranging discussion on sustainable urban planning, design and construction. The papers submitted to this especial issue are of interest to all those involved in activities across the built environment and related sectors.

Dr. Behzad Sodagar
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • sustainable design and construction
  • low carbon design
  • autonomous buildings
  • innovative construction techniques
  • intelligent technologies
  • sustainable sourcing of materials
  • renewable energies
  • whole life cycle analysis
  • carbon footprint
  • eco-refurbishment
  • design for sustainable deconstruction
  • comfort
  • sustainable neighbourhoods and cities

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Choice of Domestic Air-Sourced Solar Photovoltaic Thermal Systems through the Operational Energy Cost Implications in Scotland
Sustainability 2013, 5(3), 1256-1265; doi:10.3390/su5031256
Received: 4 December 2012 / Revised: 27 February 2013 / Accepted: 5 March 2013 / Published: 19 March 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In Scotland, homebuilders are requested to take valiant efforts to meet the government’s ambition that all newly built homes should be carbon-neutral by 2016/17. In delivering net zero carbon homes, the application of renewable energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaic (PV) power generating
[...] Read more.
In Scotland, homebuilders are requested to take valiant efforts to meet the government’s ambition that all newly built homes should be carbon-neutral by 2016/17. In delivering net zero carbon homes, the application of renewable energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaic (PV) power generating systems, is almost inevitable. Cost-effectiveness of emerging green technologies is a major factor that affects stakeholders’ housing design decision-making on whether or not the innovations can be applied in practical terms. Based on the United Kingdom (UK) government’s Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) for energy rating of dwellings, this study conducted a comparative value assessment of 19 design alternatives set. The options also included ones that encompassed both electricity and heat generation potentials of PV applications—i.e., air-sourced PV thermal (PV/T) systems. Based on the SAP simulation results, it concluded that operational energy use and cost, as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) emission levels, can drastically be reduced particularly when a PV/T system is combined with a low-energy and high-performance mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR) system that can extract fresh air heated by PV. This study led to visualizing the cost-effectiveness of PV/T MVHR systems and identifying the economic value over 10 years at the interest rate of 10%, based on an assumption that the innovations are applied to Scottish homes today. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design and Construction)
Open AccessArticle Sustainable Construction for Urban Infill Development Using Engineered Massive Wood Panel Systems
Sustainability 2012, 4(10), 2707-2742; doi:10.3390/su4102707
Received: 13 August 2012 / Revised: 1 October 2012 / Accepted: 4 October 2012 / Published: 18 October 2012
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (1120 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Prefabricated engineered solid wood panel construction systems can sequester and store CO2. Modular cross-laminated timber (CLT, also called cross-lam) panels form the basis of low-carbon, engineered construction systems using solid wood panels that can be used to build residential infill developments
[...] Read more.
Prefabricated engineered solid wood panel construction systems can sequester and store CO2. Modular cross-laminated timber (CLT, also called cross-lam) panels form the basis of low-carbon, engineered construction systems using solid wood panels that can be used to build residential infill developments of 10 storeys or higher. Multi-apartment buildings of 4 to 10 storeys constructed entirely in timber, such as recently in Europe, are innovative, but their social and cultural acceptance in Australia and North America is at this stage still uncertain. Future commercial utilisation is only possible if there is a user acceptance. The author is part of a research team that aims to study two problems: first models of urban infill; then focus on how the use of the CLT systems can play an important role in facilitating a more livable city with better models of infill housing. Wood is an important contemporary building resource due to its low embodied energy and unique attributes. The potential of prefabricated engineered solid wood panel systems, such as CLT, as a sustainable building material and system is only just being realised around the globe. Since timber is one of the few materials that has the capacity to store carbon in large quantities over a long period of time, solid wood panel construction offers the opportunity of carbon engineering, to turn buildings into ‘carbon sinks’. Thus some of the historically negative environmental impact of urban development and construction can be turned around with CLT construction on brownfield sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design and Construction)
Open AccessArticle Effects of Roof Pitch on Air Flow and Heating Load of Sealed and Vented Attics for Gable-Roof Residential Buildings
Sustainability 2012, 4(9), 1999-2021; doi:10.3390/su4091999
Received: 29 June 2012 / Revised: 10 August 2012 / Accepted: 20 August 2012 / Published: 30 August 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (4050 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pitch value is an important consideration in residential gable roof design and construction. However, how roof pitch, coupled with air flows in attic space, affects the energy performance of building attics has been barely investigated. In this paper, a 2D unsteady computational fluid
[...] Read more.
Pitch value is an important consideration in residential gable roof design and construction. However, how roof pitch, coupled with air flows in attic space, affects the energy performance of building attics has been barely investigated. In this paper, a 2D unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is employed to investigate the effects of roof pitch on air flow and heating load of both sealed and vented attics for gable-roof residential buildings. The simulation results show that air flow in the sealed attics is steady and asymmetric, while that in the vented attics is a combination of an essentially symmetric base flow and a periodically oscillating flow. For both the sealed and vented attic cases, the heating load is found to increase with the roof pitch, and the heat transfer of turbulent air flow in attic space can be satisfactorily correlated by a simple relationship between appropriately defined Nusselt number and Rayleigh number. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Design and Construction)

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