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Special Issue "Green Chemistry for Environment and Health"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2009)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Werner Bonrath

DSM Nutritional Products, Research and Development, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland
Fax: +41 61 687 21 17
Interests: catalysis (general); vitamins (general); chemistry under non-classical conditions (ionic liquids; supercritical fluids; ultrasound and microwaves)

Special Issue Information

This special issue will include papers from the International Symposium on Green Chemistry for Environment and Health held in Munich, Germany, 13-16 October 2008.

Keywords

  • green chemistry
  • environment
  • public health
  • sustainability

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Production of Biosorbents from Waste Olive Cake and Its Adsorption Characteristics for Zn2+ Ion
Sustainability 2009, 1(2), 277-297; doi:10.3390/su1020277
Received: 7 May 2009 / Accepted: 1 June 2009 / Published: 4 June 2009
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, waste olive cake (OC) was utilized as the raw material for the production of biosorbents by chemical treatment and its adsorption capacity for zinc ion was evaluated. Tests were conducted with the total biomass (T) and with the fraction [...] Read more.
In this study, waste olive cake (OC) was utilized as the raw material for the production of biosorbents by chemical treatment and its adsorption capacity for zinc ion was evaluated. Tests were conducted with the total biomass (T) and with the fraction > 2.00 mm (P), in order to determinate the influence of this fractionation step on subsequent treatments. Two chemical agents were used: sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide. The parameters studied include physical and chemical properties of materials, contact time, pH, adsorbent dose and initial concentrations. The kinetic data were best fitted to the pseudo-second order model. Zinc binding is strongly pH dependent, with more zinc ions bound at a higher pH (5-7 in a range of 3-7). Both Langmuir and Freundlich models are well suited to fit the data on sorption of zinc by OC. Data on sorption of zinc by waste olive cake treated with sulfuric acid (OC-H) was better described by the Freundlich model. Zinc sorption by waste olive cake treated with sodium hydroxide (OC-OH) was better described by the Langmuir model. Results show OC-OH is a biosorbent with a superior adsorption capacity for zinc than OC-H. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherms increases in the order (mg/g): OC-HT (14), OCT (22) and OC-OHT (27). Results also indicate that the previous fractionation step doesn´t produce a biosorbent with a superior adsorption capacity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry for Environment and Health)
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Open AccessCommunication Selective Reduction of Dimedone
Sustainability 2009, 1(2), 209-214; doi:10.3390/su1020209
Received: 30 March 2009 / Accepted: 13 May 2009 / Published: 14 May 2009
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Abstract
The selective hydrogenation of dimedone (1) to the corresponding monoketone 2 over palladium and Amberlyst 15® is reported. The product is a synthetic building block for the fragrance and pharmaceutical industry. Advantages of the new catalytic procedure are the high catalyst [...] Read more.
The selective hydrogenation of dimedone (1) to the corresponding monoketone 2 over palladium and Amberlyst 15® is reported. The product is a synthetic building block for the fragrance and pharmaceutical industry. Advantages of the new catalytic procedure are the high catalyst activity and selectivity, less by-product formation, avoidance of the presence of acid, and consequently, less salt formation due to the omission of a neutralization step. Using a substrate/catalyst ratio of >100 compound 2 can be synthesized in 97% yield at full conversion. Recycling of the catalyst several times has been shown to be feasible without any detectable decrease in selectivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry for Environment and Health)
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Open AccessArticle Methanetrisulfonic Acid: A Highly Efficient Strongly Acidic Catalyst for Wagner-Meerwein Rearrangement, Friedel-Crafts Alkylation and Acylation Reactions. Examples from Vitamin E Synthesis
Sustainability 2009, 1(2), 161-186; doi:10.3390/su1020161
Received: 23 March 2009 / Accepted: 13 April 2009 / Published: 16 April 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (157 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Methanetrisulfonic acid had been prepared for the first time over 140 years ago, but it was used only scarcely in chemical transformations. In the course of our activities dealing with key-steps of industrial syntheses of vitamins, e.g. economically important vitamin E (acetate), [...] Read more.
Methanetrisulfonic acid had been prepared for the first time over 140 years ago, but it was used only scarcely in chemical transformations. In the course of our activities dealing with key-steps of industrial syntheses of vitamins, e.g. economically important vitamin E (acetate), we found that methanetrisulfonic acid is an extremely effective catalyst in a variety of reactions. Examples of its applications are Wagner-Meerwein rearrangements, Friedel-Crafts alkylations and ring closures, as well as acylation reactions. Use of this catalyst in truly catalytic amounts (0.04-1.0 mol%) resulted in highly selective transformations and yields over 95%. (Remark by the authors: We are describing only one example each for the various types of reactions. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to write (here and in the Introduction and in the Conclusion sections): “Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement, Friedel-Crafts alkylation and ring closure, as well as acylation reactions”) Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry for Environment and Health)

Review

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Open AccessReview On the Way to Improve the Environmental Benignity of Chemical Processes: Novel Catalysts for a Polymerization Process
Sustainability 2009, 1(1), 35-42; doi:10.3390/su1010035
Received: 10 February 2009 / Accepted: 14 March 2009 / Published: 19 March 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (138 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An example for a process that can, in principle, be improved by the application of a catalyst is the synthesis of poly(2-methyl-propene)s (“polyisobutenes”), which are important for numerous industrial applications. Each year several 100,000 t are produced. The production of low-molecular weight [...] Read more.
An example for a process that can, in principle, be improved by the application of a catalyst is the synthesis of poly(2-methyl-propene)s (“polyisobutenes”), which are important for numerous industrial applications. Each year several 100,000 t are produced. The production of low-molecular weight polyisobutenes by means of cationic initiation by an excess of Lewis acids is well established. Typically, these initiators require the usage of solvents like chloroform, dichloromethane and ethylene and temperatures far below 0 °C (–100 °C in the case of ethylene as solvent). Solvent stabilized transition metal complexes with weakly coordinating counter anions overcome these drawbacks and thus are not only more efficient, but also more environmentally benign: they can be applied at ambient temperature and in non chlorinated solvents at low concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Chemistry for Environment and Health)
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