E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Bin Shen

Glorious Sun School of Business and Management, Donghua University, Shanghai, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable fashion supply chain management; sustainable fashion operations; sustainability in marketing and retailing
Guest Editor
Dr. Qingying Li

Glorious Sun School of Business and Management, Donghua University, Shanghai, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable service operations; sustainable supply chain management; sustainable fashion business
Guest Editor
Prof. Ciwei Dong

School of Business Administration, Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, Wuhan, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable operations; sustainable supply chain; sustainable service management
Guest Editor
Dr. Patsy Perry

School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainability issues in fashion marketing; e-commerce; supply chain management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability has become a global issue. A sustainable supply chain should follow the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) and is environmentally friendly, socially responsible, and economically sustainable. Pollution and unsustainable practices are crucial in the textile and apparel supply chain. The challenge of being sustainable in textile and apparel supply chain management is to better predict and manage sustainability issues.

In this Special Issue, we aim to publish state-of-the-art research concerning sustainability issues in the textile and apparel supply chains. The research methodology can be qualitative or quantitative. Thus, the research methodologies, such as analytical modeling, statistical-based empirical analysis, and case studies, are welcomed. We also invite interested authors to contribute technical research and comprehensive review articles to this Special Issue.

Dr. Bin Shen
Dr. Qingying Li
Prof. Ciwei Dong
Dr. Patsy Perry
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable textile and apparel supply chain with application
  • Textile and apparel reverse logistics
  • Green and close-loop logistics and supply chain in apparel and textile
  • Corporate social responsibility in textile and apparel supply chains
  • Ethical fashion in supply chains
  • Information management for sustainable textile and apparel supply chains
  • Knowledge management in sustainable textile and apparel supply chains

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle An Exploratory Study of the Mechanism of Sustainable Value Creation in the Luxury Fashion Industry
Sustainability 2017, 9(4), 483; doi:10.3390/su9040483
Received: 27 January 2017 / Revised: 19 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
PDF Full-text (1711 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, increasing numbers of luxury groups have adopted sustainable practices in their supply chains (sourcing, manufacturing, logistics, distribution, servicing, waste and recycling). However, the report from Greenpeace International organization (2014) indicates that some luxury brands/companies did not actively conduct sustainable practices
[...] Read more.
In recent years, increasing numbers of luxury groups have adopted sustainable practices in their supply chains (sourcing, manufacturing, logistics, distribution, servicing, waste and recycling). However, the report from Greenpeace International organization (2014) indicates that some luxury brands/companies did not actively conduct sustainable practices to produce items, which is likely attributed to the cost and risks caused by such practices outweighing the benefits. This, to some extent, is due to the failure of developing collaborative practices. Specifically, some luxury brands may fail to develop collaborative practices to create value that are able to benefit multiple stakeholders. Thus, in our study, we explore the value creation mechanism to create sustainable value that benefits not only brands’ shareholders, but also other stakeholders, including producers, customers, other stakeholders in the society (e.g., marginalized people) and the environment. In addition, based on a case study from Stella McCartney and Kering and the literature on value creation, we develop a novel model for guiding sustainable value creation (i.e., value co-creation model), where the conceptual building blocks and specific practices are presented. Our contribution lies in extending the knowledge of the value co-creation model from co-creation with customers to co-creation with multiple stakeholders and elaborating systematically and empirically sustainable value co-creation mechanisms including the building blocks and specific practices. In addition, this study offers significant managerial insights for luxury brands/companies to effectively achieve sustainable value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Integrated Approach for Sustainable Performance Evaluation in Value Chain of Vietnam Textile and Apparel Industry
Sustainability 2017, 9(3), 477; doi:10.3390/su9030477
Received: 23 January 2017 / Revised: 19 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 22 March 2017
PDF Full-text (1930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The impressive growth of the Vietnam textile and apparel industry has led to some concerns due to its insufficient value chain and fierce competition within the industry. Thus, performance evaluation is significant issue to estimate the values of companies over time. Firstly, the
[...] Read more.
The impressive growth of the Vietnam textile and apparel industry has led to some concerns due to its insufficient value chain and fierce competition within the industry. Thus, performance evaluation is significant issue to estimate the values of companies over time. Firstly, the grey prediction is used to forecast future data for 20 largest enterprises in six years (2016–2021) based on actual indicators. Then, the paper uses Malmquist productivity index and its decomposition into efficiency and technical change to measure the past productivity growth. Finally, window analysis is applied to significantly detect the trends of performance in 12 years (2010–2021) from large number of inputs and outputs. The results are found that how technology changes is the determinant for productivity growth and undeveloped technology causes a huge barrier to industry. In addition, the results are illustrated that textile companies are predicted to be more stable due to the importance of supplying materials for the entire industry. This paper aims to prove in-depth analysis can be conducted through combined models and also provide some recommendations for enhancing the sustainability performance of the industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Ethical Climate and Job Attitude in Fashion Retail Employees’ Turnover Intention, and Perceived Organizational Sustainability Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study
Sustainability 2017, 9(3), 465; doi:10.3390/su9030465
Received: 7 November 2016 / Revised: 3 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 21 March 2017
PDF Full-text (757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The relationship between the fashion retail industry’s working environment and the high rate of employee turnover has been highlighted as one of the key concerns for negative organizational performance in both the short and long term. This relationship creates a need to investigate
[...] Read more.
The relationship between the fashion retail industry’s working environment and the high rate of employee turnover has been highlighted as one of the key concerns for negative organizational performance in both the short and long term. This relationship creates a need to investigate the ethical climate within fashion retail businesses, employees’ attitudes toward their jobs, and employees’ turnover intention, as these factors can influence organizations’ performance including their likelihood of achieving the triple bottom lines of sustainability. Based on social exchange and human and social capital theories, this study investigated how employees’ ethical climate and turnover intention are affected by both individual- and organizational-level factors, and their impact on the triple bottom lines of organizational sustainability performance. This study empirically tested a structural model based on the survey responses from 278 U.S. fashion retail employees. The findings show that an ethical climate can enhance employees’ job attitude as well as all three dimensions of organizational sustainability performance—financial, social, and environmental. Creating an ethical climate in an organization can decrease employees’ turnover intention, but also employees’ attitudes towards their jobs lowers their turnover intention. The study’s findings reveal that not only can employees’ attitudes toward their jobs impact organizational sustainability performance, but creating an ethical working environment is another important way to improve organizational sustainability performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Sustainability as Social Contract: Textile and Apparel Professionals’ Value Conflicts within the Corporate Moral Responsibility Spectrum
Sustainability 2016, 8(12), 1278; doi:10.3390/su8121278
Received: 27 September 2016 / Revised: 20 November 2016 / Accepted: 1 December 2016 / Published: 7 December 2016
PDF Full-text (573 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Current discussions of sustainability in the textile and apparel (T&A) supply chain tend to focus on consumer behavior or methods of production. Few studies investigate how T&A supply chain members experience corporate sustainability initiatives within their own moral value spectrum. This study was
[...] Read more.
Current discussions of sustainability in the textile and apparel (T&A) supply chain tend to focus on consumer behavior or methods of production. Few studies investigate how T&A supply chain members experience corporate sustainability initiatives within their own moral value spectrum. This study was designed to describe the gaps that might exist between personal and corporate moral values of T&A supply chain members, and how individuals manage such gaps to align personal and corporate identities. The researchers investigated the views of ten T&A supply chain members residing in the United States, both as employees and consumers of T&A companies, through semi-structured interviews. Dunfee’s extant social contracts and Schwartz’s theory of basic values were used as theoretical frameworks to better understand the participants’ lived experiences in negotiating personal and corporate expectations. The findings revealed three themes: (a) nature of the value gap; (b) frustration due to the value gap; and (c) strategies to manage the value gap. The strategies used to realign values split into either those that held sustainability as their responsibility and worked to move corporate values toward their personal values; or those that shifted the blame to others so that their values could remain untouched. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Social Sustainable Supply Chain Management in the Textile and Apparel Industry—A Literature Review
Sustainability 2017, 9(1), 100; doi:10.3390/su9010100
Received: 11 November 2016 / Revised: 6 December 2016 / Accepted: 16 December 2016 / Published: 12 January 2017
PDF Full-text (1153 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
So far, a vast amount of studies on sustainability in supply chain management have been conducted by academics over the last decade. Nevertheless, socially related aspects are still neglected in the related discussion. The primary motivation of the present literature review has arisen
[...] Read more.
So far, a vast amount of studies on sustainability in supply chain management have been conducted by academics over the last decade. Nevertheless, socially related aspects are still neglected in the related discussion. The primary motivation of the present literature review has arisen from this shortcoming, thus the key purpose of this study is to enrich the discussion by providing a state-of-the-art, focusing exclusively on social issues in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) by considering the textile/apparel sector as the field of application. The authors conduct a literature review, including content analysis which covers 45 articles published in English peer-reviewed journals, and proposes a comprehensive map which integrates the latest findings on socially related practices in the textile/apparel industry with the dominant conceptualization in order to reveal potential research areas in the field. The results show an ongoing lack of investigation regarding the social dimension of the triple bottom line in SSCM. Findings indicate that a company’s internal orientation is the main assisting factor in sustainable supply chain management practices. Further, supplier collaboration and assessment can be interpreted as an offer for suppliers deriving from stakeholders and a focal company’s management of social risk. Nevertheless, suppliers do also face or even create huge barriers in improving their social performance. This calls for more empirical research and qualitative or quantitative survey methods, especially at the supplier level located in developing countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Issues in the Textile and Apparel Supply Chains)
Figures

Figure 1

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sustainability Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Special Issue Edit a special issue Review for Sustainability
Back to Top