Special Issue "The Intergenerational Transmission of Offending in a Historical and International Perspective"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Steve van de Weijer

Postdoc Researcher NSCR, De Boelelaan 1077a, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 205985172
Interests: life-course criminology; criminal careers; intergenerational transmission; genetic influences on crime
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Catrien Bijleveld

Director NSCR, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Professor at the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology at VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +31 205985468
Interests: intergenerational continuity in offending; sex offenders; criminal careers; international crimes
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Barry Godfrey

Professor at the Department of Sociology, Social Policy, and Criminology at University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 (0)151 794 3021
Interests: sentencing and desistence; long-term trends in criminal justice policy; criminal justice history; the management of risk in society

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The relationship between a parent and a child is one of the most influential and intimate relationships over the life course of an individual. Children resemble their parents in life outcomes such as socioeconomic status, family formation characteristics, and political views. Some families are also stuck in intergenerational patterns of criminal behavior, despite youth care interventions, judicial sanctions, and social mobility. It is therefore not surprising that a vast and growing number of studies have investigated criminal behavior from an intergenerational perspective. This issue is to engage critically with the topic of Intergenerational Transmission of Offending. For this purpose, both conceptual, analytical, quantitative as well as qualitative studies, with perspectives from different scientific disciplines (e.g., criminology, sociology, anthropology, history, biology), engaging with the topic of Intergenerational Transmission of Offending will be considered for this multidisciplinary Special Issue.

Dr. Steve van de Weijer
Prof. Dr. Barry Godfrey
Prof. Dr. Catrien Bijleveld
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Intergenerational transmission
  • Criminal offending
  • History
  • Cross-national
  • Mechanisms
  • Analytical
  • Quantitative
  • Qualitative
  • Conceptual

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle How Legacies of Genocide Are Transmitted in the Family Environment: A Qualitative Study of Two Generations in Rwanda
Societies 2017, 7(3), 24; doi:10.3390/soc7030024
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 3 September 2017 / Accepted: 7 September 2017 / Published: 14 September 2017
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Abstract
The 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda and its aftermath led to large-scale individual traumatization, disruption of family structures, shifts in gender roles, and tensions in communities, which are all ongoing. Previous research around the world has demonstrated the transgenerational effects of
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The 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda and its aftermath led to large-scale individual traumatization, disruption of family structures, shifts in gender roles, and tensions in communities, which are all ongoing. Previous research around the world has demonstrated the transgenerational effects of mass violence on individuals, families and communities. In Rwanda, in light of recurrent episodes of violence in the past, attention to the potential ‘cycle of violence’ is warranted. The assumption that violence is passed from generation to generation was first formulated in research on domestic violence and child abuse, but is receiving increasing attention in conflict-affected societies. However, the mechanisms behind intergenerational transmission are still poorly understood. Based on qualitative research with 41 mothers and their adolescent children, we investigated how legacies of the 1994 genocide and its aftermath are transmitted to the next generation through processes in the family environment in Rwanda. Our findings reveal direct and indirect pathways of transmission. We also argue that intergenerational effects might best be described as heterotypic: genocide and its aftermath lead to multiple challenges in the children’s lives, but do not necessarily translate into new physical violence. Further research is needed on how children actively engage with conflict legacies of the past. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Role of Heart Rate Levels in the Intergenerational Transmission of Crime
Societies 2017, 7(3), 23; doi:10.3390/soc7030023
Received: 27 June 2017 / Revised: 28 August 2017 / Accepted: 3 September 2017 / Published: 8 September 2017
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Abstract
Several prospective multigenerational studies have shown that crime runs in the family, while empirical research on the biological causes of crime has also established that low heart rate is related to antisocial behavior. This study examines whether the intergenerational transmission of crime is
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Several prospective multigenerational studies have shown that crime runs in the family, while empirical research on the biological causes of crime has also established that low heart rate is related to antisocial behavior. This study examines whether the intergenerational transmission of crime is moderated or mediated by a low heart rate of the son. Prospectively collected conviction data on 794 men from three consecutive generations of the Dutch Transfive dataset is used. Heart rates were measured around age 18, during the medical examination prior to the mandatory military service in the Dutch army. All analyses were conducted separately for violent and non-violent crime. Both paternal violence and low heart rate levels are associated with increased violent offending. Intergenerational transmission of violence was only found among families in which the son had a low heart rate, although the degree of transmission did not differ significantly from families in which the son had a high heart rate. No support was found for a mediating influence of low heart rates of criminals’ offspring on the intergenerational transmission of crime and violence. The results from this study underline the importance to focus on the interaction between biological risk factors and psychosocial risk factors for criminal behavior. Full article
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