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Societies 2018, 8(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc8020033

The Role of Parental Maltreatment and Parental Social Control on Self-Reported Violent Offending in Indonesia and the U.S.: Does Gender Make a Difference?

1
School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, College of Public Affairs and Community Service, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182, USA
3
Department of Sociology and School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, College of Social Sciences and Humanities, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 2 March 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 24 May 2018 / Published: 26 May 2018
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Abstract

In this article, we examine the role of parental maltreatment and parental social control in violent delinquency in two different countries: Indonesia and the U.S. but we go further by asking if gender makes a difference. We use a sample of Indonesian and U.S. youths from ISRD3 data, a self-reported survey instrument administered across multiple countries. We use logistic regressions to examine the associations between parental maltreatment, parental social control and self-reported violent delinquency and test whether gender and country modifies these associations. We find that both gender and country are significant predictors of violent delinquency. Further, there are differences between Indonesian and U.S. youths in terms of the predictors that are associated with violent delinquent offending. Specifically, parental maltreatment in the form of direct exposure to parental violence is a significant predictor for U.S. youths but not Indonesian youths whereas parental supervision is a significant deterrent of violent offending for both. We also find that girls are more likely to report violent offending than males when indirectly exposed to violence. Thus, our findings reiterate that both gender and context matter. View Full-Text
Keywords: parental maltreatment; parental social control; country; gender; violent offending; social learning; power-control; parental supervision parental maltreatment; parental social control; country; gender; violent offending; social learning; power-control; parental supervision
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Kokkalera, S.S.; Marshall, C.E.; Haen Marshall, I. The Role of Parental Maltreatment and Parental Social Control on Self-Reported Violent Offending in Indonesia and the U.S.: Does Gender Make a Difference? Societies 2018, 8, 33.

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