E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Matteo Tonezzer

IMEM - CNR Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism – Italian National Research Council, Trento Unit, NanoScience Group, Via alla Cascata 56/C, Povo - 38123 Trento - (@ FBK), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 0461 314875
Interests: OMBE; Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition; CVD; PECVD; field effect transistor; OFET; metal oxides; metal oxide nanowires; organic thin films; small conjugated molecules; gas sensors; liquid sensors; biosensors; environmental monitoring; hybrid sensors; functionalized nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid state gas sensors based on semiconducting metal oxides represent the most widely studied and employed class of devices for the detection of several reducing and oxidising species. Particularly, the use of nanocrystalline materials brings advantages in terms of surface to volume ratio, and as a result increases the gas response enormously. However, the need of high working temperatures and the lack of selectivity are still among the main problems of such kind of devices.
On the other side, organic molecules offer the possibility of being chemically designed and tailored to display specific interactions with different gases. Furthermore, they exhibit a good response even at low operation temperatures, if compared with metal oxides. Unfortunately, their poor  properties in terms of charge carrier transport is a difficult bottleneck which hinders their use as active materials in gas sensing applications. Therefore, they still show limitations in solid state performance, response stability and duration.
Researchers are being invited to submit articles for this special issue, showing new concepts and architectures of gas sensors exploiting hybrid organic-inorganic materials that join the metal oxide response and stability over time with the selectivity of organic materials.
Combinations of metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles on one side, and small conjugated molecules, polymers or carbon nanotubes on the other side, are only two examples of the many possibilities which can be investigated towards this novel concept of organic-inorganic hybrid device.

Dr. Matteo Tonezzer
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • gas sensors
  • gas detection
  • gas analysis
  • hybrid sensors
  • metal oxide
  • organic material
  • thin films
  • nanostructured materials
  • nanowires; polymers
  • carbon nanotubes

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle A Novel Flexible Room Temperature Ethanol Gas Sensor Based on SnO2 Doped Poly-Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride
Sensors 2013, 13(4), 4378-4389; doi:10.3390/s130404378
Received: 1 March 2013 / Revised: 26 March 2013 / Accepted: 27 March 2013 / Published: 2 April 2013
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (585 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A novel flexible room temperature ethanol gas sensor was fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. The polyimide (PI) substrate-based sensor was formed by depositing a mixture of SnO2 nanopowder and poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDAC) on as-patterned interdigitated electrodes. PDDAC acted both as the
[...] Read more.
A novel flexible room temperature ethanol gas sensor was fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. The polyimide (PI) substrate-based sensor was formed by depositing a mixture of SnO2 nanopowder and poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDAC) on as-patterned interdigitated electrodes. PDDAC acted both as the binder, promoting the adhesion between SnO2 and the flexible PI substrate, and the dopant. We found that the response of SnO2-PDDAC sensor is significantly higher than that of SnO2 alone, indicating that the doping with PDDAC effectively improved the sensor performance. The SnO2-PDDAC sensor has a detection limit of 10 ppm at room temperature and shows good selectivity to ethanol, making it very suitable for monitoring drunken driving. The microstructures of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), and the sensing mechanism is also discussed in detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors)
Open AccessArticle Low Temperature Sensing Properties of a Nano Hybrid Material Based on ZnO Nanotetrapods and Titanyl Phthalocyanine
Sensors 2013, 13(3), 3445-3453; doi:10.3390/s130303445
Received: 22 January 2013 / Revised: 7 March 2013 / Accepted: 8 March 2013 / Published: 13 March 2013
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
ZnO nanotetrapods have recently been exploited for the realization of high-sensitivity gas sensors, but they are affected by the typical drawbacks of metal-oxides, i.e., poor selectivity and a relatively high working temperature. On the other hand, it has been also demonstrated that
[...] Read more.
ZnO nanotetrapods have recently been exploited for the realization of high-sensitivity gas sensors, but they are affected by the typical drawbacks of metal-oxides, i.e., poor selectivity and a relatively high working temperature. On the other hand, it has been also demonstrated that the combined use of nanostructured metal oxides and organic molecules can improve the gas sensing performance sensitivity or selectivity, even at lower temperatures. A gas sensor device, based on films of interconnected ZnO nanotetrapods properly functionalized by titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc), has been realized in order to combine the high surface to volume ratio and structural stability of the crystalline ZnO nanostructures with the enhanced sensitivity of the semiconducting TiOPc molecule, especially at low temperature. The electronic properties of the resulting nanohybrid material are different from those of each single component. The response of the hybrid nanostructure towards different gases has been compared with that of ZnO nanotetrapod without functionalization in order to highlight the peculiar properties of the hybrid interaction(s). The dynamic response in time has been studied for different gases and temperatures; in particular, an increase in the response to NO2 has been observed, even at room temperature. The formation of localized p-n heterojunctions and the possibility of exchanging charge carriers at the hybrid interface is shown to be crucial for the sensing mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Pt-TiO2/MWCNTs Hybrid Composites for Monitoring Low Hydrogen Concentrations in Air
Sensors 2012, 12(9), 12361-12373; doi:10.3390/s120912361
Received: 24 August 2012 / Revised: 5 September 2012 / Accepted: 7 September 2012 / Published: 10 September 2012
Cited by 16 | PDF Full-text (622 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hydrogen is a valuable fuel for the next energy scenario. Unfortunately, hydrogen is highly flammable at concentrations higher than 4% in air. This aspect makes the monitoring of H2 leaks an essential issue for safety reasons, especially in the transportation field. In
[...] Read more.
Hydrogen is a valuable fuel for the next energy scenario. Unfortunately, hydrogen is highly flammable at concentrations higher than 4% in air. This aspect makes the monitoring of H2 leaks an essential issue for safety reasons, especially in the transportation field. In this paper, nanocomposites based on Pt-doped TiO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been introduced as sensitive materials for H2 at low temperatures. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposites with different composition have been prepared by a simple wet chemical procedure and their morphological, microstructural and electrical properties were investigated. Resistive thick-film devices have been fabricated printing the hybrid nanocomposites on alumina substrates provided with Pt interdigitated electrodes. Electrical tests in air have shown that embedding MWCNTs in the TiO2 matrix modify markedly the electrical conductivity, providing a means to decrease the resistance of the sensing layer. Pt acts as a catalytic additive. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs-based sensors were found to be sensitive to hydrogen at concentrations between 0.5 and 3% in air, satisfying the requisites for practical applications in hydrogen leak detection devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Calcium Oxide Matrices and Carbon Dioxide Sensors
Sensors 2012, 12(5), 5896-5905; doi:10.3390/s120505896
Received: 29 March 2012 / Revised: 3 May 2012 / Accepted: 4 May 2012 / Published: 8 May 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Homogeneous matrices of calcium oxide (CaO) were prepared by mixing this material with polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as malleable inert support in order to obtain processable composites. Preliminary tests were carried out to assess the best concentration of CaO in the composite, individuated
[...] Read more.
Homogeneous matrices of calcium oxide (CaO) were prepared by mixing this material with polyethylene glycol (PEG) acting as malleable inert support in order to obtain processable composites. Preliminary tests were carried out to assess the best concentration of CaO in the composite, individuated in the CaO/PEG weight ratio of 1/4. Experimental data highlighted that the composite was able to selectively detect carbon dioxide (CO2) via a nanogravimetric method by performing the experiments inside an atmosphere-controlled chamber filled with CO2. Furthermore, the composite material showed a linear absorption of CO2 as a function of the gas concentration inside the atmosphere-controlled chamber, thus paving the way for the possible use of these matrices for applications in the field of sensor devices for long-term evaluation of accumulated environmental CO2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Interfacial Structures and Properties of Organic Materials for Biosensors: An Overview
Sensors 2012, 12(11), 15036-15062; doi:10.3390/s121115036
Received: 21 September 2012 / Revised: 31 October 2012 / Accepted: 2 November 2012 / Published: 6 November 2012
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (602 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The capabilities of biosensors for bio-environmental monitoring have profound influences on medical, pharmaceutical, and environmental applications. This paper provides an overview on the background and applications of the state-of-the-art biosensors. Different types of biosensors are summarized and sensing mechanisms are discussed. A review
[...] Read more.
The capabilities of biosensors for bio-environmental monitoring have profound influences on medical, pharmaceutical, and environmental applications. This paper provides an overview on the background and applications of the state-of-the-art biosensors. Different types of biosensors are summarized and sensing mechanisms are discussed. A review of organic materials used in biosensors is given. Specifically, this review focuses on self-assembled monolayers (SAM) due to their high sensitivity and high versatility. The kinetics, chemistry, and the immobilization strategies of biomolecules are discussed. Other representative organic materials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and conductive polymers are also introduced in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organics and Metal Oxide Hybrid Sensors)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sensors
Back to Top