Special Issue "Human Centred Robotics"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Robotics (ISSN 2218-6581).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Huosheng Hu

School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, CO4 3SQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44-1206872297
Fax: +44 1206 872788
Interests: robotics; embedded systems; mechatronics; advanced manufacturing; multi-modal human-machine interfaces; wearable sensors and systems; sensor integration and data fusion algorithms; biomedical signal processing; classification; modelling; engineering devices; e-health; rehabilitation robotics; medical and surgical robotics; AI applications; intelligent control and learning algorithms; cooperative underwater; flying robots in security surveillance; search and rescue; pervasive computing and networked sensors; systems; instrumentations and robots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human Centred Robotics puts humans in the centre of technological developments and represents a vision of the future where various kinds of intelligent robots that will coexist with humans. These intelligent robots serve humans in daily life or in a hazardous environment, including home or personal service robots, entertainment robots, education robots, medical robots, healthcare and rehabilitation robots, search and rescue robots.

This special issue will focus on original papers of innovative ideas and concepts, new discoveries and improvements, as well as novel applications and business models which are related to the field of human-centred robots or intelligent service robotics.

Prof. Dr. Huosheng Hu
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • intelligent mechatronics, robotics and biomimetics
  • biologically-inspired, novel and unconventional robots
  • modelling, identification and control of autonomous robots
  • elements, structures, mechanisms of micro and nano robots
  • sensors and wireless sensor networks for robot navigation
  • biomedical and rehabilitation robots and artificial organs
  • AI, neural networks and fuzzy logic in robot learning and adaptation
  • tele-robotics, human computer interaction, human-robot interaction

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Sensor-Based Trajectory Generation for Advanced Driver Assistance System
Robotics 2013, 2(1), 19-35; doi:10.3390/robotics2010019
Received: 11 January 2013 / Revised: 19 February 2013 / Accepted: 5 March 2013 / Published: 11 March 2013
PDF Full-text (325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper investigates the trajectory generation problem for an advanced driver assistance system that could sense the driving state of the vehicle, so that a collision free trajectory can be generated safely. Specifically, the problem of trajectory generation is solved for the safety
[...] Read more.
This paper investigates the trajectory generation problem for an advanced driver assistance system that could sense the driving state of the vehicle, so that a collision free trajectory can be generated safely. Specifically, the problem of trajectory generation is solved for the safety assessment of the driving state and to manipulate the vehicle in order to avoid any possible collisions. The vehicle senses the environment so as to obtain information about other vehicles and static obstacles ahead. Vehicles may share the perception of the environment via an inter-vehicle communication system. The planning algorithm is based on a visibility graph. A lateral repulsive potential is applied to adaptively maintain a trade-off between the trajectory length and vehicle clearance, which is the greatest problem associated with visibility graphs. As opposed to adaptive roadmap approaches, the algorithm exploits the structured nature of the environment for construction of the roadmap. Furthermore, the mostly organized nature of traffic systems is exploited to obtain orientation invariance, which is another limitation of both visibility graphs and adaptive roadmaps. Simulation results show that the algorithm can successfully solve the problem for a variety of commonly found scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Centred Robotics)
Open AccessArticle Ant Robotic Swarm for Visualizing Invisible Hazardous Substances
Robotics 2013, 2(1), 1-18; doi:10.3390/robotics2010001
Received: 8 November 2012 / Revised: 21 December 2012 / Accepted: 4 January 2013 / Published: 7 January 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (866 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inspired by the simplicity of how nature solves its problems, this paper presents a novel approach that would enable a swarm of ant robotic agents (robots with limited sensing, communication, computational and memory resources) form a visual representation of distributed hazardous substances within
[...] Read more.
Inspired by the simplicity of how nature solves its problems, this paper presents a novel approach that would enable a swarm of ant robotic agents (robots with limited sensing, communication, computational and memory resources) form a visual representation of distributed hazardous substances within an environment dominated by diffusion processes using a decentralized approach. Such a visual representation could be very useful in enabling a quicker evacuation of a city’s population affected by such hazardous substances. This is especially true if the ratio of emergency workers to the population number is very small. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Centred Robotics)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Psychophysiological Methods to Evaluate User’s Response in Human Robot Interaction: A Review and Feasibility Study
Robotics 2013, 2(2), 92-121; doi:10.3390/robotics2020092
Received: 24 March 2013 / Revised: 13 May 2013 / Accepted: 14 May 2013 / Published: 10 June 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (476 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Implementing psychophysiological measures is a worthwhile approach for understanding human reaction to robot presence in terms of individual emotional state. This paper reviews the suitability of using psychophysiological assessment in human-robot interaction (HRI) research. A review of most common psychophysiological parameters used in
[...] Read more.
Implementing psychophysiological measures is a worthwhile approach for understanding human reaction to robot presence in terms of individual emotional state. This paper reviews the suitability of using psychophysiological assessment in human-robot interaction (HRI) research. A review of most common psychophysiological parameters used in a controlled laboratory setting is provided and advantages and challenges of their utilization in HRI experiments are described. Exemplar studies focused on the implementation of psychophysiological measures for the evaluation of the emotional responses of the participants to the robots’ presence are described. Based on the reviewed literature, the paper also describes the results of our own research experience to make the most of the emerged recommendations. We planned and performed a study aimed at implementing psychophysiological measurements for assessing the human response of two groups of older adults (Healthy vs. Mild Cognitive Impairment subjects) towards a telepresence robot. Finally, the paper provides a summary of lessons learned across the field in using psychophysiological measures in HRI studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Centred Robotics)
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Robotics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
robotics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Robotics
Back to Top