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Special Issue "Paediatric Nutrition and Metabolism"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Günther Boehm

Baby Nutrition Research, Danone Research, Centre for Specialised Nutrition, Milupa GmbH, Bahnstrasse 14, 30 61381 Friedrichsdorf, Germany
Fax: +49 (0) 6172 991862
Interests: infant nutrition; preterm infant nutrition; intrauterine development; metabolic programming; human milk; physiology of human lactation; neuronal development; immunity and nutrition; metabolic X syndrome in childhood; protein; lipids (LCPUFA); prebiotics

Keywords

  • proteins
  • peptides
  • carbohydrates
  • non-digestible carbohydrates
  • prebiotics
  • probiotics
  • metabolism disorders
  • eating behaviour
  • obesity
  • bone metabolism
  • brain metabolism
  • development of gastrointestinal tract
  • metabolic programming
  • nutrition during infection

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Human Milk Banking–Facts and Issues to Resolve
Nutrients 2010, 2(7), 762-769; doi:10.3390/nu2070762
Received: 27 May 2010 / Revised: 5 July 2010 / Accepted: 7 July 2010 / Published: 13 July 2010
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (55 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The number of human milk banks is increasing worldwide. Although the beneficial effects of feeding premature infants with their mother’s milk are well documented, less is known about the effects of feeding these infants with pasteurized donor milk. We propose a randomized [...] Read more.
The number of human milk banks is increasing worldwide. Although the beneficial effects of feeding premature infants with their mother’s milk are well documented, less is known about the effects of feeding these infants with pasteurized donor milk. We propose a randomized trial comparing the effects of a 100% human milk-based diet (human milk supplemented with a human milk-derived fortifier) and a diet (partially) based on bovine milk. In theory, human milk has a beneficial effect on various aspects of human physiology, most of which become apparent after infancy. We therefore propose an extensive follow-up program that takes this aspect into consideration. Other issues concerning the practice of human milk banks need to be addressed as well as optimization of the feeding strategies for preterm infants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Nutrition and Metabolism)
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Open AccessArticle Short-Term Effect of Prebiotics Administration on Stool Characteristics and Serum Cytokines Dynamics in Very Young Children with Acute Diarrhea
Nutrients 2010, 2(7), 683-692; doi:10.3390/nu2070683
Received: 17 May 2010 / Revised: 18 June 2010 / Accepted: 21 June 2010 / Published: 30 June 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (215 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We investigated the effect of a mixture of long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and acidic oligosaccharides on the number and consistency of stools and on immune system biomarkers in 104 supplemented and non-supplemented subjects (aged 9–24 months) with acute diarrhea. Interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-1RA, IL-6, [...] Read more.
We investigated the effect of a mixture of long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides and acidic oligosaccharides on the number and consistency of stools and on immune system biomarkers in 104 supplemented and non-supplemented subjects (aged 9–24 months) with acute diarrhea. Interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and sIL-2R cytokine levels were determined. The significant decrease in number of stools and increase in stool consistency in the supplemented group was of little clinical relevance. The only significant change in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines was decreased TNF-α levels in the supplemented group. Prebiotic supplementation during acute diarrhea episodes did not influence the clinical course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Nutrition and Metabolism)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Inborn Errors of Metabolism
Nutrients 2010, 2(9), 965-974; doi:10.3390/nu2090965
Received: 4 August 2010 / Revised: 6 September 2010 / Accepted: 13 September 2010 / Published: 15 September 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (240 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The treatment of children with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) is mainly based on restricted dietary intake of protein-containing foods. However, dietary protein restriction may not only reduce amino acid intake, but may be associated with low intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids [...] Read more.
The treatment of children with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) is mainly based on restricted dietary intake of protein-containing foods. However, dietary protein restriction may not only reduce amino acid intake, but may be associated with low intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids as well. This review focuses on the consequences of dietary restriction in IEM on the bioavailability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) and on the attempts to ameliorate these consequences. We were able to identify during a literature search 10 observational studies investigating LCPUFA status in patients with IEM and six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting effect of LCPUFA supplementation to the diet of children with IEM. Decreased LCPUFA status, in particular decreased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status, has been found in patients suffering from IEM based on the evidence of observational studies. LCPUFA supplementation effectively improves DHA status without detectable adverse reactions. Further research should focus on functional outcomes of LCPUFA supplementation in children with IEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Nutrition and Metabolism)
Open AccessReview Effect of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation on Neurodevelopmental Outcome in Full-Term Infants
Nutrients 2010, 2(8), 790-804; doi:10.3390/nu2080790
Received: 17 June 2010 / Revised: 6 July 2010 / Accepted: 15 July 2010 / Published: 27 July 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (222 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It takes more than 20 years before the human brain obtains its complex, adult configuration. Most dramatic developmental changes occur prenatally and early postnatally. During development, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) such as doxosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are accreted [...] Read more.
It takes more than 20 years before the human brain obtains its complex, adult configuration. Most dramatic developmental changes occur prenatally and early postnatally. During development, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) such as doxosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) are accreted in the brain. Since breastfeeding is associated with a better developmental outcome than formula feeding, and human milk in contrast to traditional standard formula contains LCPUFA, the question arose whether LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula may promote the neurodevelopmental outcome. The current paper reviews the evidence available in full-term infants. It concludes that postnatal supplementation of formula with LCPUFA is associated with a beneficial effect on short-term neurodevelopmental outcome. However, no evidence is available that LCPUFA supplementation enhances neurodevelopmental outcome in full-term infants beyond the age of four months. Nevertheless, it should be realized that very limited information is available on the effect of LCPUFA supplementation on neurodevelopmental outcome at school age or later. It is conceivable that effects of LCPUFA supplementation first emerge or re-emerge at school age when more complex neural functions are expressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Nutrition and Metabolism)

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