Special Issue "Trends of Nanomaterials in Life Sciences"

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A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Greg Rorrer

School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biofabrication; bioinspired assembly; biominerization
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. François Baneyx

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Box 351750, Seattle, WA 98195-1750, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 2066857659
Fax: +1 206 685 3451
Interests: nanobiotechnology; protein aided nanomanufacturing; hybrid nanostructures; molecular biomimetics; organic-inorganic interface

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Nanomaterials will focus on the publication of studies that advance the frontiers of bionanotechnology at the intersection of nanomaterials and biological systems. The underlying theme that ties nanomaterials to the life sciences is the interface between nanomaterials and biomolecules, particularly within living organisms. Fundamental understanding of this interface has broad applications in biomedicine and materials science.

Nanomaterials—nanostructured materials and nanoparticles—commonly possess enhanced optical, electronic, or magnetic properties enabled by virtue of their nanoscale dimensions where quantum effects play a role. Nanomaterials include metallic, metal oxide, organic and polymer nanoparticles or nanocrystals, as well as their composites or inorganic-organic hybrids; nanostructured thin films, membranes, photonic crystals and porous materials; and nanostructured carbon (nanotubes, graphene). Biomolecules, which can also be nanostructured, include proteins, peptides, DNA and nucleic acids and oligomers, and lipids. Synergistic interaction of nanomaterials with biomolecules, either alone or in living systems, enables a host of applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Functionalization of nanomaterials with biomolecules that results in hybrid materials with enhanced properties;
  • Fundamental study of the bio/nanomaterial interface, including new surface analytical techniques;
  • Biosensing, bio-imaging, and targeted drug delivery enabled by new nanomaterials;
  • Engineered and purposeful interactions of functional nanomaterials with living cells & tissues, particularly for applications in biomedicine;
  • Synthesis and hierarchical assembly of new nanomaterials enabled by biomolecules, living cells, or living tissues.

Prof. Dr. Greg Rorrer
Prof. Dr. François Baneyx
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • biofunctionalization of nanomaterials
  • biomolecule/nanomaterial interface
  • cellular/nanomaterial interactions
  • biomolecule-mediated nanomaterial synthesis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Investigation of Sub-100 nm Gold Nanoparticles for Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of Cancer
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(1), 86-106; doi:10.3390/nano3010086
Received: 10 December 2012 / Revised: 21 January 2013 / Accepted: 25 January 2013 / Published: 31 January 2013
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1348 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Specialized gold nanostructures are of interest for the development of alternative treatment methods in medicine. Photothermal therapy combined with gene therapy that supports hyperthermia is proposed as a novel multimodal treatment method for prostate cancer. In this work, photothermal therapy using small (<100
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Specialized gold nanostructures are of interest for the development of alternative treatment methods in medicine. Photothermal therapy combined with gene therapy that supports hyperthermia is proposed as a novel multimodal treatment method for prostate cancer. In this work, photothermal therapy using small (<100 nm) gold nanoparticles and near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation combined with gene therapy targeting heat shock protein (HSP) 27 was investigated. A series of nanoparticles: nanoshells, nanorods, core-corona nanoparticles and hollow nanoshells, were synthesized and examined to compare their properties and suitability as photothermal agents. In vitro cellular uptake studies of the nanoparticles into prostate cancer cell lines were performed using light scattering microscopy to provide three-dimensional (3D) imaging. Small gold nanoshells (40 nm) displayed the greatest cellular uptake of the nanoparticles studied and were used in photothermal studies. Photothermal treatment of the cancer cell lines with laser irradiation at 800 nm at 4 W on a spot size of 4 mm (FWHM) for 6 or 10 min resulted in an increase in temperature of ~12 °C and decrease in cell viability of up to 70%. However, in vitro studies combining photothermal therapy with gene therapy targeting HSP27 did not result in additional sensitization of the prostate cancer cells to hyperthermia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends of Nanomaterials in Life Sciences)
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Open AccessCommunication Assembly of DNA Architectures in a Non-Aqueous Solution
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(3), 275-285; doi:10.3390/nano2030275
Received: 18 June 2012 / Revised: 8 August 2012 / Accepted: 20 August 2012 / Published: 31 August 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1792 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In the present work, the procedures for the creation of self-assembled DNA nanostructures in aqueous and non-aqueous media are described. DNA-Surfactant complex formation renders the DNA soluble in organic solvents offering an exciting way to bridge the transition of DNA origami materials electronics
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In the present work, the procedures for the creation of self-assembled DNA nanostructures in aqueous and non-aqueous media are described. DNA-Surfactant complex formation renders the DNA soluble in organic solvents offering an exciting way to bridge the transition of DNA origami materials electronics applications. The DNA retains its structural features, and these unique geometries provide an interesting candidate for future electronics and nanofabrication applications with potential for new properties. The DNA architectures were first assembled under aqueous conditions, and then characterized in solution (using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy) and on the surface (using atomic force microscopy (AFM)). Following aqueous assembly, the DNA nanostructures were transitioned to a non-aqueous environment, where butanol was chosen for optical compatibility and thermal properties. The retention of DNA hierarchical structure and thermal stability in non-aqueous conditions were confirmed via CD spectroscopy. The formation and characterization of these higher order DNA-surfactant complexes is described in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends of Nanomaterials in Life Sciences)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(2), 242-271; doi:10.3390/nano3020242
Received: 18 March 2013 / Revised: 23 April 2013 / Accepted: 24 April 2013 / Published: 10 May 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1870 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly
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Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends of Nanomaterials in Life Sciences)
Open AccessReview Rafts, Nanoparticles and Neural Disease
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(3), 217-250; doi:10.3390/nano2030217
Received: 12 June 2012 / Revised: 19 July 2012 / Accepted: 20 July 2012 / Published: 6 August 2012
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Abstract
This review examines the role of membrane rafts in neural disease as a rationale for drug targeting utilizing lipid-based nanoparticles. The article begins with an overview of methodological issues involving the existence, sizes, and lifetimes of rafts, and then examines raft function in
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This review examines the role of membrane rafts in neural disease as a rationale for drug targeting utilizing lipid-based nanoparticles. The article begins with an overview of methodological issues involving the existence, sizes, and lifetimes of rafts, and then examines raft function in the etiologies of three major neural diseases—epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease—selected as promising candidates for raft-based therapeutics. Raft-targeting drug delivery systems involving liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles are then examined in detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends of Nanomaterials in Life Sciences)

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