Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Water Treatment"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dror Avisar

Hydrochemistry, Head of the Water Research Center, Earth Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel
Website | E-Mail
Interests: (a) Identifying the fate and transport mechanisms of various persistent pollutants and degradation by-products in domestic and hospital wastewater, effluents and biosolids; industrial fish ponds, effluent irrigated fields, river streams and groundwater; (b) Technology development for water treatment and purification via various combinations of Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) for removal of persistent pollutants such as pharmaceutical compounds from wastewater effluent/wastewater

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many engineered nanoparticle (ENP) products that rely on the chemical and physical properties are examined at the production and synthesis stage, and are well characterized, both in terms of size, shape, aggregation behaviour, as well as in terms of their interactions and the possible health effects on workers during all steps of production and of consumers during delivery. Given that ENPs are used in many industries—from medicine, through food and crop production and up to environmental and water technologies—it is of little surprise that many ENPs find their way “post-use” to the environment with possible eco-toxicological and health effects. In the recent years much attention has been given to eco-toxicological effects of ENPs in the aquatic environment. These studies are complicated by the multiple interactions ENP can undergo in the aqueous media—changes in redox chemistry, chemisorption and desorption of toxic organics or toxic metals, biodegradation, bioaccumulation, aggregation and disaggregation, deposition and resuspension, as well as dissolution and re-precipitation of phases in aquatic environments. NPs released to the aquatic environment and left untreated in water treatment plants may contaminate drinking water sources used for human consumption. An important issue is the fate of ENP in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). The behaviour on ENPs in wastewater and effluent is complicated (especially compared to freshwater) by the high content of organic matter and surfactants in wastewater, materials that could affect the ENPs in many, unpredictable, ways. Therefore, the fate of ENPs after they enter the water cycle and the effect of wastewater treatment on these ENPs should be evaluated.

Prof. Dr. Dror Avisar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • engineered nanoparticles
  • contamination
  • wastewater
  • ecotoxicology
  • heteroaggregation
  • drinking water
  • natural organic matter
  • collides

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle N-Doped TiO2-Coated Ceramic Membrane for Carbamazepine Degradation in Different Water Qualities
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(8), 206; doi:10.3390/nano7080206
Received: 31 May 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 31 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The photocatalytic degradation of the model pollutant carbamazepine (CBZ) was investigated under simulated solar irradiation with an N-doped TiO2-coated Al2O3 photocatalytic membrane, using different water types. The photocatalytic membrane combines photocatalysis and membrane filtration in a single step.
[...] Read more.
The photocatalytic degradation of the model pollutant carbamazepine (CBZ) was investigated under simulated solar irradiation with an N-doped TiO2-coated Al2O3 photocatalytic membrane, using different water types. The photocatalytic membrane combines photocatalysis and membrane filtration in a single step. The impact of each individual constituent such as acidity, alkalinity, dissolved organic matter (DOM), divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+), and Cl on the degradation of CBZ was examined. CBZ in water was efficiently degraded by an N-doped TiO2-coated Al2O3 membrane. However, elements added to the water, which simulate the constituents of natural water, had an impact on the CBZ degradation. Water alkalinity inhibited CBZ degradation mostly due to increase in pH while radical scavenging by carbonate was more dominant at higher values (>200 mg/L as CaCO3). A negative effect of Ca2+ addition on photocatalytic degradation was found only in combination with phosphate buffer, probably caused by deposition of CaHPO4 or CaHPO4·2H2O on the catalyst surface. The presence of Cl and Mg2+ ions had no effect on CBZ degradation. DOM significantly inhibited CBZ degradation for all tested background organic compounds. The photocatalytic activity of N-doped TiO2-coated Al2O3 membranes gradually decreased after continuous use; however, it was successfully regenerated by 0.1% HCl chemical cleaning. Nevertheless, dissolution of metals like Al and Ti should be monitored following acid cleaning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication Citrus Pectin-Derived Carbon Microspheres with Superior Adsorption Ability for Methylene Blue
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(7), 161; doi:10.3390/nano7070161
Received: 27 May 2017 / Revised: 23 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
PDF Full-text (6266 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study, citrus pectin-derived, green, and tunable carbon microspheres with superior adsorption capacity and high adsorption rate, as well as good reusability toward methylene blue adsorption, were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method without any hazardous chemicals. The materials hold great potential
[...] Read more.
In this study, citrus pectin-derived, green, and tunable carbon microspheres with superior adsorption capacity and high adsorption rate, as well as good reusability toward methylene blue adsorption, were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method without any hazardous chemicals. The materials hold great potential for the treatment of methylene blue wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Removal of Carmine from Aqueous Solution by Carbonated Hydroxyapatite Nanorods
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 137; doi:10.3390/nano7060137
Received: 2 April 2017 / Revised: 28 May 2017 / Accepted: 31 May 2017 / Published: 5 June 2017
PDF Full-text (1884 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods were prepared by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized CHA nanorods was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Carmine was
[...] Read more.
In this study, carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods were prepared by a novel hydrothermal method. The crystallinity and chemical structure of synthesized CHA nanorods was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Carmine was selected as representative organic dyes to study the adsorption capacities of CHA nanorods. Mechanistic studies of carmine adsorption by CHA nanorods show that the adsorption processes both follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and fit the Langmuir isotherm model well. The CHA nanorods exhibited a high adsorption capacity of 85.51 mg/g for carmine at room-temperature. The experimental results prove that CHA nanorods can be promising absorbents for removing organic dye pollutants in wastewater from paper and textile plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Magnetic Hybrid Nanosorbents for the Uptake of Paraquat from Water
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(3), 68; doi:10.3390/nano7030068
Received: 12 February 2017 / Revised: 12 March 2017 / Accepted: 13 March 2017 / Published: 18 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3824 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Although paraquat has been banned in European countries, this herbicide is still used all over the world, thanks to its low-cost, high-efficiency, and fast action. Because paraquat is highly toxic to humans and animals, there is interest in mitigating the consequences of its
[...] Read more.
Although paraquat has been banned in European countries, this herbicide is still used all over the world, thanks to its low-cost, high-efficiency, and fast action. Because paraquat is highly toxic to humans and animals, there is interest in mitigating the consequences of its use, namely by implementing removal procedures capable of curbing its environmental and health risks. This research describes new magnetic nanosorbents composed of magnetite cores functionalized with bio-hybrid siliceous shells, that can be used to uptake paraquat from water using magnetically-assisted procedures. The biopolymers κ-carrageenan and starch were introduced into the siliceous shells, resulting in two hybrid materials, Fe3O4@SiO2/SiCRG and Fe3O4@SiO2/SiStarch, respectively, that exhibit a distinct surface chemistry. The Fe3O4@SiO2/SiCRG biosorbents displayed a superior paraquat removal performance, with a good fitting to the Langmuir and Toth isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity of paraquat for Fe3O4@SiO2/SiCRG biosorbents was 257 mg·g−1, which places this sorbent among the best systems for the removal of this herbicide from water. The interesting performance of the κ-carrageenan hybrid, along with its magnetic properties and good regeneration capacity, presents a very efficient way for the remediation of water contaminated with paraquat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Microwave-Hydrothermal Synthesis of SnO2-CNTs Hybrid Nanocomposites with Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(3), 54; doi:10.3390/nano7030054
Received: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 29 November 2016 / Published: 3 March 2017
PDF Full-text (2187 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
SnO2 nanoparticles coated on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared via a simple microwave-hydrothermal route. The as-obtained SnO2-CNTs composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2-CNTs for degradation of Rhodamine B under visible
[...] Read more.
SnO2 nanoparticles coated on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared via a simple microwave-hydrothermal route. The as-obtained SnO2-CNTs composites were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared SnO2-CNTs for degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation was investigated. The results show that SnO2-CNTs nanocomposites have a higher photocatalytic activity than pure SnO2 due to the rapid transferring of electrons and the effective separation of holes and electrons on SnO2-CNTs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Vertically-Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanowires and Their Application as a Photocatalyst
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(1), 9; doi:10.3390/nano7010009
Received: 24 November 2016 / Revised: 23 December 2016 / Accepted: 29 December 2016 / Published: 11 January 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (805 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were hydrothermally synthesized on a glass substrate with the assistance of a pre-coated ZnO seeding layer. The crystalline structure, morphology and transmission spectrum of the as-synthesized sample were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy
[...] Read more.
Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires were hydrothermally synthesized on a glass substrate with the assistance of a pre-coated ZnO seeding layer. The crystalline structure, morphology and transmission spectrum of the as-synthesized sample were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, respectively, indicating a wurzite ZnO material of approximately 100 nm wire diameter and absorbance at 425 nm and lower wavelengths. The photocatalytic activity of the sample was tested via the degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solution under UV-A irradiation. The synthesized nanowires showed a high photocatalytic activity, which increased up to 90% degradation in 2 h as pH was increased to 12. It was shown that the photocatalytic activity of the nanowires was proportional to the length to diameter ratio of the nanowires, which was in turn controlled by the growth time and grain size of the seed layer. Estimates suggest that diffusion into the regions between nanowires may be significantly hindered. Finally, the reusability of the prepared ZnO nanowire samples was also investigated, with results showing that the nanowires still showed 97% of its original photoactivity after ten cycles of use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Water Treatment)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: TiON photocatalitic membrane for removal of micro pollutants in various water environments
Authors: Enbal Luster 1,2, Dror Avisar 2, Inna Horovitz 1,2, Luca Lozzi 3, Hadas Mamane 1,2
Affiliations: 1 Environmental engeeniring, Tel Aviv University, Israel
2 Water Research Center, Earth Sciences, Faculty of Exact Sciences, tel Aviv Universty, Israel
3 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, Italy
Abstract: The use of solar energy to activate nano-structured photocatalyst via advanced oxidation process (AOP) is a promising and emerging water treatment process. The photocatalytic activity (PCA) of N-doped TiO2 (TiON) coated Al2O3 photocatalytic membrane to photodegrade Carbamazepine (CBZ), a model compound for common pollutant was investigated in different water qualities. The photocatalytic membrane combines membrane filtration and advanced oxidation processes as photocatalysis in a single step. However, the presence of anions, cations and natural organic matter (NOM) can affect photocatalytic efficiency through competitive adsorption, hydroxyl radical scavenging or by inner filter effect. Degradation CBZ was determined by addition of individual constituents as pH, alkalinity, NOM, divalent cations (Mg+2 and Ca+2) and chloride. TiON catalyst showed a high potential to degrade carbamazepine from deionized water, under simulated solar irradiation. Water quality results showed a significant reduction in PCA in natural surface water. The added constituents in water matrix simulating natural water have an impact the degradation of CBZ. Addition of NOM, carbonate ions, Mg+2 and Ca+2 results in reduction in CBZ degradation rate (15%, 30%, 25% and 20%, respectively). No detrimental effect was found from chloride addition while increasing pH showed inconclusive results as reaction rate increased when the level of pH approached neutral. Chemical cleaning by 0.1% HCl showed a high potential for membrane photocatalytic activity regeneration after continuous use.

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Nanomaterials Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Nanomaterials Edit a special issue Review for Nanomaterials
logo
loading...
Back to Top