Special Issue "Nanogenerators and Self-Powered Nanosystems"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Junyi Zhai

Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +86-10-82854798
Fax: +86-10-82854700
Interests: piezoelectric semiconductor; electronic devices
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yong Qin

Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, 222 South Tianshui Road, Lanzhou 730000, China
E-Mail
Phone: +86-931-8915038
Fax: +86-931-8915038
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Zhong Lin Wang

School of Materials Science & Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-404-894-8008
Fax: +1-404-894-9140
Interests: nanogenerators and self-powered nanosystems; piezotronics for smart systems; piezo-phototronics for energy science and optoelectronics; hybrid cells for energy harvesting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The nanogenerator was first invented in 2005 by Prof. Zhong Lin Wang. It uses the piezoelectric potential of nanomaterials generated under strain in order to drive free electrons to flow back and forth in an external circuit. Self-powered nanosystems combine the nanogenerator with functional nanodevices in order to harvest mechanical energy from the environment into electricity to power nanodevices. It can work independently, without any other external power sources. This Special Issue focuses on state-of-the-art, international advances in these two fields (Nanogenerators and Self-powered nanosystems).

The first paper on nanogenerators was published in Science, in 2006, by Prof. Zhong Lin Wang and Dr. Jinhui Song. It demonstrates the fundamental working principle of nanogenerators, by bending a ZnO nanowire using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. Additionally, in that paper, the idea of a self-powered nanosystem was put forward. In 2007, DC nanogenerators, driven by ultrasonic waves, were reported. In 2008, a type of fiber-based nanogenerator, which can harvest the low frequency and weak mechanical movement energy in the environment were reported in Nature; this nanogenerator was also a wearable unit. To conquer the challenges of increasing output voltage, an AC nanogenerator was reported in 2009, in Nature Nanotechnology. Additionally, a type of integrated nanogenerator was invented and reported on in 2010 in Nature Nanotechnology; the output voltage in the nanotechnology is greater than 1 V, which means that the nanogenerator’s output can be rectified, stored, and further used to power devices. Then, many kinds of nanogenerators have been reported and their applications greatly expanded. In 2012, Prof. Zhong Lin Wang’s group reported the first organic-material-based triboelectirc nanogenerator. It uses the electrostatic charges created on the surfaces of two different materials during physical contact and separation in order to generate induced charges to harvest mechanical energy into electricity. After its invention, the development of the fundamentals of this kind of triboelectric nanogenerator’s was rapid, which quickly pushed its applications in a wide range of fields. With the great progress of these two kinds of nanogenerators (piezoelectric nanogenerator and triboelectric nanogenerator), self-powered nanosystems are being developed very rapidly. In this Special Issue, we want to report on the up-to-date research on nanogenerators, self-powered nanosystems, and their applications.

cutting-edge research topics include:

  • 1D/2D piezoelectric nanostructures: synthesis, characterization, and properties
  • Piezoelectric nanogenerators: dundamental studies, new design and their applications
  • Triboelectric nanogenerators: dundamental studies, new design and their applications
  • Hybrid energy harvesting technologies including nanogenerators
  • Self-powered nanosystems: integration technology, new design, new applications

Prof. Dr. Yong Qin
Prof. Dr. Junyi Zhai
Prof. Dr. Zhong Lin Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • piezoeletric nanogenerator
  • triboelectric nanogenerator
  • self-powered nanosystem
  • energy harvesting
  • nanomaterial

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Flexible Piezoelectric Generators by Using the Bending Motion Method of Direct-Grown-PZT Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 308; doi:10.3390/nano7100308
Received: 16 August 2017 / Revised: 18 September 2017 / Accepted: 2 October 2017 / Published: 7 October 2017
PDF Full-text (4533 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Recently, composite-type nanogenerators (NGs) formed from piezoelectric nanostructures and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have become one of the excellent candidates for future energy harvesting because of their ability to apply the excellent electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the synthesis of NG
[...] Read more.
Recently, composite-type nanogenerators (NGs) formed from piezoelectric nanostructures and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have become one of the excellent candidates for future energy harvesting because of their ability to apply the excellent electrical and mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the synthesis of NG devices with a high proportion of piezoelectric materials and a low polymer content, such as of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), continues to be problematic. In this work, high-piezoelectric-material-content flexible films produced from Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)-atomically-interconnected CNTs and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are presented. Various physical and chemical characterization techniques are employed to examine the morphology and structure of the materials. The direct growth of the piezoelectric material on the CNTs, by stirring the PZT and CNT mixed solution, results in various positive effects, such as a high-quality dispersion in the polymer matrix and addition of flexoelectricity to piezoelectricity, resulting in the enhancement of the output voltage by an external mechanical force. The NGs repeatedly generate an output voltage of 0.15 V. These results present a significant step toward the application of NGs using piezoelectric nanocomposite materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanogenerators and Self-Powered Nanosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Theoretical Study of the BaTiO3 Powder’s Volume Ratio’s Influence on the Output of Composite Piezoelectric Nanogenerator
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 143; doi:10.3390/nano7060143
Received: 6 April 2017 / Revised: 29 May 2017 / Accepted: 5 June 2017 / Published: 9 June 2017
PDF Full-text (2284 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The combination of the piezoelectric materials and polymer is an effective way to make the piezoelectric nanogenerator (PENG) possess both the polymer’s good flexibility and ferroelectric material’s high piezoelectric coefficient. The volume ratio of ferroelectric material in the composite is an important factor
[...] Read more.
The combination of the piezoelectric materials and polymer is an effective way to make the piezoelectric nanogenerator (PENG) possess both the polymer’s good flexibility and ferroelectric material’s high piezoelectric coefficient. The volume ratio of ferroelectric material in the composite is an important factor that determines the PENG’s output performance. In this paper, the BaTiO3/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite PENG was demonstrated as having an optimal volume ratio (46%) at which the PENG can output its highest voltage, and this phenomenon can be ascribed to the trade-off between the composite PENG’s top electrode charge and its capacitance. These results are of practical importance for the composite PENG’s performance optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanogenerators and Self-Powered Nanosystems)
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