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Special Issue "Surface Modification of Nanoparticles"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 March 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Pablo del Pino

BioNanoTools lab at CIQUS, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles and multifunctional nanocapsules
Guest Editor
Dr. Beatriz Pelaz

BioNanoTools lab at CIQUS, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: surface modification of nanomaterials
Guest Editor
Dr. Ester Polo

BioNanoTools lab at CIQUS, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: protein corona and biomimetics nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology has provided novel tools for engineering inorganic and organic nanomaterials with special properties, due to the intrinsic physicho-chemical properties of the material, and tunable features, such as size, shape, and surface chemistry. A plethora of existing surface nanoparticle functionalization strategies allows designing multifunctional platform as promising solutions for diagnostics and therapeutics. Surface modification with different polymers, ligands, biomolecules, etc., enable to increase the solubility and stability properties, avoid nonspecific biomolecules adsorption, and develop multifunctional nanomaterials introducing targeting motives (such as peptides, sugars, nucleic acids, or proteins), as well as decorating with fluorescent labels or incorporating drugs.

Nevertheless, independently of the surface functionality, when nanomaterials are in contact with biological fluids, the surface is immediately covered and modified by endogenous biomolecules giving them a new identity, which dictates the final biological response. The organization of certain biomolecules and the exposure of specific protein domains or sequences on the nanoparticle surface can trigger specific cellular recognition pathways, therefore, the environment plays a key role in the recognition event itself and has to be taken into account. It is imperative to seek for characterization techniques capable of assessing the availability and accessibility of the active target on the nanoparticle surface giving insights on the surface geometry and functionality, and for methodologies that enable to acquire molecular information in a realistic biological scenario.

New emerging design strategies move towards functionality biomimetic designs, by using nature components from cells to introduce natural targeting specificities on the nanoparticle surface. It then becomes possible to design the nanoparticles surface to engineer predicable biological responses avoiding undesirable effects.

A complete understanding of the molecular interactions at the nanointerface would provide the tools to design smart nanoscale materials that efficiently regulate their interactions with complex biological systems (cells and biological barriers)

Dr. Pablo del Pino
Dr. Beatriz Pelaz
Dr. Ester Polo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • multivalency
  • multifuncional nanocapsules
  • protein corona
  • biomimetic
  • theranostic

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Hyperspectral-Enhanced Dark Field Microscopy for Single and Collective Nanoparticle Characterization in Biological Environments
Materials 2018, 11(2), 243; doi:10.3390/ma11020243
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 18 January 2018 / Accepted: 31 January 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
PDF Full-text (7769 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We review how the hyperspectral dark field analysis gives us quantitative insights into the manner that different nanoscale materials interact with their environment and how this relationship is directly expressed in an optical readout. We engage classification tools to identify dominant spectral signatures
[...] Read more.
We review how the hyperspectral dark field analysis gives us quantitative insights into the manner that different nanoscale materials interact with their environment and how this relationship is directly expressed in an optical readout. We engage classification tools to identify dominant spectral signatures within a scene or to qualitatively characterize nanoparticles individually or in populations based on their composition and morphology. Moreover, we follow up the morphological evolution of nanoparticles over time and in different biological environments to better understand and establish a link between the observed nanoparticles’ changes and cellular behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification of Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Applications, Surface Modification and Functionalization of Nickel Nanorods
Materials 2018, 11(1), 45; doi:10.3390/ma11010045
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
PDF Full-text (2516 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The growing number of nanoparticle applications in science and industry is leading to increasingly complex nanostructures that fulfill certain tasks in a specific environment. Nickel nanorods already possess promising properties due to their magnetic behavior and their elongated shape. The relevance of this
[...] Read more.
The growing number of nanoparticle applications in science and industry is leading to increasingly complex nanostructures that fulfill certain tasks in a specific environment. Nickel nanorods already possess promising properties due to their magnetic behavior and their elongated shape. The relevance of this kind of nanorod in a complex measurement setting can be further improved by suitable surface modification and functionalization procedures, so that customized nanostructures for a specific application become available. In this review, we focus on nickel nanorods that are synthesized by electrodeposition into porous templates, as this is the most common type of nickel nanorod fabrication method. Moreover, it is a facile synthesis approach that can be easily established in a laboratory environment. Firstly, we will discuss possible applications of nickel nanorods ranging from data storage to catalysis, biosensing and cancer treatment. Secondly, we will focus on nickel nanorod surface modification strategies, which represent a crucial step for the successful application of nanorods in all medical and biological settings. Here, the immobilization of antibodies or peptides onto the nanorod surface adds another functionality in order to yield highly promising nanostructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Modification of Nanoparticles)
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Figure 1

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