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Special Issue "Magnetostrictive Composite Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Professor Fumio Narita

Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Multi-scale mechanics and multi-physics; Simulation and experiment; Electromagnetic composite materials; Strength and function; Smart materials and structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interest in magnetostrictive composite materials has steadily increased in recent years. The reason for this success is that the new generation of composite material systems show special functionalities: Sensing, actuation, structural health monitoring, vibration control, energy harvesting. Magnetostrictive composite materials, including electromagnetic (ME) composites and magneto-sensitive elastomers, are used in the realization of smart materials and structures. The constitutive behavior of these composite materials couples their mechanical response with other physical fields. In magnetostrictive materials, the magnetic behavior is coupled with the mechanical one due to the direct magnetostrictive effect and inverse (Villari) effect.

The integration of magnetostrictive (active) materials into the traditional (passive) ones is a key aspect in the material and structural behavior, and this integration can occur at different scales and in different ways. At the micromechanical level, particles, fibers, and thin films of magnetostrictive materials can be arranged irregularly or regularly in passive ones. At a macroscopic level, the arrangement of active and passive parts can assume the shape of a bar, plate or shell. These give an idea of the motivations that drive the research effort in modelling and simulation, fabrication and characterization, reliability and durability of the magnetostrictive composite materials, and the reason why this is a very challenging open research field.

This Special Issue covers a very wide and varied range of subject areas that fall under its title-theme, and all aspects (theoretical, computational, experimental studies and/or industrial applications) of magnetostrictive composite materials from state-of-the-art fundamental research to applied research and applications in emerging technologies.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Fumio Narita
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Multi-scale mechanics and multi-physics
  • Simulation and experiment
  • Electromagnetic composite materials
  • Strength and function
  • Smart materials and structures

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Giant Enhancement of Magnetostrictive Response in Directionally-Solidified Fe83Ga17Erx Compounds
Materials 2018, 11(6), 1039; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11061039
Received: 19 May 2018 / Revised: 7 June 2018 / Accepted: 8 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
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Abstract
We report, for the first time, correlations between crystal structure, microstructure and magnetofunctional response in directionally solidified [110]-textured Fe83Ga17Erx (0 < x < 1.2) alloys. The morphology of the doped samples consists of columnar grains, mainly composed of
[...] Read more.
We report, for the first time, correlations between crystal structure, microstructure and magnetofunctional response in directionally solidified [110]-textured Fe83Ga17Erx (0 < x < 1.2) alloys. The morphology of the doped samples consists of columnar grains, mainly composed of a matrix phase and precipitates of a secondary phase deposited along the grain boundary region. An enhancement of more than ~275% from ~45 to 170 ppm is observed in the saturation magnetostriction value (λs) of Fe83Ga17Erx alloys with the introduction of small amounts of Er. Moreover, it was noted that the low field derivative of magnetostriction with respect to an applied magnetic field (i.e., dλs/dHapp for Happ up to 1000 Oe) increases by ~230% with Er doping (dλs/dHapp,FeGa= 0.045 ppm/Oe; dλs/dHapp,FeGaEr= 0.15 ppm/Oe). The enhanced magnetostrictive response of the Fe83Ga17Erx alloys is ascribed to an amalgamation of microstructural and electronic factors, namely: (i) improved grain orientation and local strain effects due to deposition of Er in the intergranular region; and (ii) strong local magnetocrystalline anisotropy, due to the highly anisotropic localized nature of the 4f electronic charge distribution of the Er atom. Overall, this work provides guidelines for further improving galfenol-based materials systems for diverse applications in the power and energy sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetostrictive Composite Materials)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle New Magnetostrictive Transducer Designs for Emerging Application Areas of NDE
Materials 2018, 11(5), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11050755
Received: 4 April 2018 / Revised: 26 April 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
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Abstract
Magnetostrictive transduction has been widely utilized in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, specifically for the generation and reception of guided waves for the long-range inspection of components such as pipes, vessels, and small tubes. Transverse-motion guided wave modes (e.g., torsional vibrations in pipes) are
[...] Read more.
Magnetostrictive transduction has been widely utilized in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, specifically for the generation and reception of guided waves for the long-range inspection of components such as pipes, vessels, and small tubes. Transverse-motion guided wave modes (e.g., torsional vibrations in pipes) are the most common choice for long-range inspection applications, because the wave motion is in the plane of the structure surface, and therefore does not couple well to the surrounding material. Magnetostrictive-based sensors for these wave modes using the Wiedemann effect have been available for several years. An alternative configuration of a sensor for generating and receiving these transverse-motion guided waves swaps the biasing and time-varying magnetic field directions. This alternative design is a reversed Wiedemann effect magnetostrictive transducer. These transducers exhibit a number of unique features compared with the more conventional Wiedemann sensor, including: (1) the use of smaller rare earth permanent magnets to achieve large, uniform, and self-sustained bias field strengths; (2) the use of more efficient electric coil arrangements to induce a stronger time-varying magnetic field for a given coil impedance; (3) beneficial non-linear operating characteristics, given the efficiency improvements in both magnetic fields; and (4) the ability to generate unidirectional guided waves when the field arrangement is combined with a magnetically soft ferromagnetic strip (patch). Reversed Wiedemann effect magnetostrictive transducers will be presented that are suitable for different inspection applications, one using electromagnetic generation and reception directly in a ferromagnetic material, and another design that integrates a magnetostrictive patch to improve its efficiency and enable special operating characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetostrictive Composite Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Weight on the Resonant Tuning of Energy Harvesting Devices Using Giant Magnetostrictive Materials
Materials 2018, 11(4), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11040581
Received: 23 March 2018 / Revised: 7 April 2018 / Accepted: 7 April 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
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Abstract
This study deals with the numerical and experimental study of the effect of weight on the resonant tuning and energy harvesting characteristics of energy harvesting devices using giant magnetostrictive materials. The energy harvesting device is made in a cantilever shape using a thin
[...] Read more.
This study deals with the numerical and experimental study of the effect of weight on the resonant tuning and energy harvesting characteristics of energy harvesting devices using giant magnetostrictive materials. The energy harvesting device is made in a cantilever shape using a thin Terfenol-D layer, stainless steel (SUS) layer and a movable proof mass, among other things. In this study, two types of movable proof mass were prepared, and the device was designed to adjust its own resonant frequency automatically to match external vibration frequency in real time. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was performed, and the resonant frequency, tip displacement, and output voltage in the devices were predicted and measured, and the simulation and experiment results were compared. The effects of the weight of the proof mass on self-tuning ability and time-varying behavior were then considered in particular. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetostrictive Composite Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Fabrication of Fe–Co Magnetostrictive Fiber Reinforced Plastic Composites and Their Sensor Performance Evaluation
Materials 2018, 11(3), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030406
Received: 9 February 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 9 March 2018
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Abstract
The inverse magnetostrictive effect is an effective property for energy harvesting; the material needs to have large magnetostriction and ease of mass production. Fe–Co alloys being magnetostrictive materials have favorable characteristics which are high strength, ductility, and excellent workability, allowing easy fabrication of
[...] Read more.
The inverse magnetostrictive effect is an effective property for energy harvesting; the material needs to have large magnetostriction and ease of mass production. Fe–Co alloys being magnetostrictive materials have favorable characteristics which are high strength, ductility, and excellent workability, allowing easy fabrication of Fe–Co alloy fibers. In this study, we fabricated magnetostrictive polymer composites, in which Fe–Co fibers were woven into polyester fabric, and discussed their sensor performance. Compression and bending tests were carried out to measure the magnetic flux density change, and the effects of magnetization, bias magnetic field, and the location of the fibers on the performance were discussed. It was shown that magnetic flux density change due to compression and bending is related to the magnetization of the Fe–Co fiber and the bias magnetic field. The magnetic flux density change of Fe–Co fiber reinforced plastics was larger than that of the plastics with Terfenol-D particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetostrictive Composite Materials)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 
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