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Special Issue "Surface Modification Methods to Improve Fatigue, Fretting Fatigue, and Fretting Wear Behavior of Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Reza H Oskouei

College of Science and Engineering, Medical Device Research Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Mechanical behaviour of biomaterials; Fretting wear and corrosion in biometals; Fatigue and Fracture; Failure Analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to the forthcoming Special Issue “Surface Modification Methods to Improve Fatigue, Fretting Fatigue, and Fretting Wear Behavior of Materials” in Materials (Open Access Materials Science Journal; Impact Factor 1.879).

Surface modification methods are increasingly applied to a wide variety of materials, with the aim of improving their fatigue and/or fretting fatigue behavior in different applications. Ranging from mechanical surface treatments, to thermal, thermochemical, electrochemical, and surface coatings treatments, these methods can significantly change surface properties and may introduce residual stresses that may then beneficially enhance the fatigue, fretting fatigue, and/or fretting wear resistance of materials.

This Special Issue aims to present the latest developments in this interesting research area, so as to include novel surface modification techniques and technologies, new applications, such as biomedical ones, mechanisms for improvements, surface characterizations, studies concerning the effectiveness of different methods, residual stress measurements, new testing procedures, simulations, and modeling.

Research articles, review articles, and communications are invited.

Should you need any further information about this Special Issue, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Dr. Reza H Oskouei
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • fatigue
  • fretting fatigue
  • fretting wear
  • coatings
  • surface modification methods
  • fatigue life improvements
  • surface properties
  • surface characterizations
  • residual stress
  • simulation and modeling

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Surface Characterizations of Fretting Fatigue Damage in Aluminum Alloy 7075-T6 Clamped Joints: The Beneficial Role of Ni–P Coatings
Materials 2016, 9(3), 141; doi:10.3390/ma9030141
Received: 14 November 2015 / Revised: 9 February 2016 / Accepted: 23 February 2016 / Published: 27 February 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (20215 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper aims to characterize the surface damage as a consequence of fretting fatigue in aluminum alloy 7075-T6 plates in double-lap bolted joints through XRD, surface profilometry, and SEM analyses. The main focus was on the surface roughness and chemical phase composition of
[...] Read more.
This paper aims to characterize the surface damage as a consequence of fretting fatigue in aluminum alloy 7075-T6 plates in double-lap bolted joints through XRD, surface profilometry, and SEM analyses. The main focus was on the surface roughness and chemical phase composition of the damaged zone along with the identification of fretting fatigue crack initiations over the surface of the material. The surface roughness of the fretted zone was found to increase when the joint was clamped with a higher tightening torque and tested under the same cyclic loading. Additionally, MgZn2 (η/ή) precipitates and ZnO phase were found to form onto the surface of uncoated aluminum plate in the fretted and worn zones. The formation of the ZnO phase was understood to be a result of frictional heat induced between the surface of contacting uncoated Al 7075-T6 plates during cyclic loading and exposure to the air. The beneficial role of electroless nickel-phosphorous (Ni–P) coatings in minimizing the fretting damage and thus improving the fretting fatigue life of the aluminum plates was also studied. The results showed that the surface roughness decreased by approximately 40% after applying Ni–P coatings to the Al 7075-T6 plates. Full article
Open AccessArticle An Investigation on the Wear Resistance and Fatigue Behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V Notched Members Coated with Hydroxyapatite Coatings
Materials 2016, 9(2), 111; doi:10.3390/ma9020111
Received: 8 December 2015 / Revised: 27 January 2016 / Accepted: 2 February 2016 / Published: 16 February 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (10449 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, surface properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy coated with hydroxyapatite coatings were investigated. Wear resistance and fatigue behaviour of samples with coating thicknesses of 10 and 50 µm as well as uncoated samples were examined. Wear experiments demonstrated that the friction factor
[...] Read more.
In this study, surface properties of Ti-6Al-4V alloy coated with hydroxyapatite coatings were investigated. Wear resistance and fatigue behaviour of samples with coating thicknesses of 10 and 50 µm as well as uncoated samples were examined. Wear experiments demonstrated that the friction factor of the uncoated titanium decreased from 0.31 to 0.06, through a fluctuating trend, after 50 cycles of wear tests. However, the friction factor of both the coated samples (10 and 50 µm) gradually decreased from 0.20 to 0.12 after 50 cycles. At the end of the 50th cycle, the penetration depth of the 10 and 50 µm coated samples were 7.69 and 6.06 µm, respectively. Fatigue tests showed that hydroxyapatite coatings could improve fatigue life of a notched Ti-6Al-4V member in both low and high cycle fatigue zones. It was understood, from fractography of the fracture surfaces, that the fatigue zone of the uncoated specimens was generally smaller in comparison with that of the coated specimens. No significant difference was observed between the fatigue life of coated specimens with 10 and 50 µm thicknesses. Full article
Open AccessArticle Influence of Residual Stress Field on the Fatigue Crack Propagation in Prestressing Steel Wires
Materials 2015, 8(11), 7589-7597; doi:10.3390/ma8115400
Received: 29 July 2015 / Revised: 25 October 2015 / Accepted: 3 November 2015 / Published: 11 November 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1557 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper deals with the effect of several residual stress profiles on the fatigue crack propagation in prestressing steel wires subjected to tension loading or bending moment. To this end, a computer program was developed to evaluate the crack front evolution on the
[...] Read more.
This paper deals with the effect of several residual stress profiles on the fatigue crack propagation in prestressing steel wires subjected to tension loading or bending moment. To this end, a computer program was developed to evaluate the crack front evolution on the basis of the Walker law. Results demonstrate that the absence of residual stresses makes the crack propagate towards a preferential crack path. When surface residual stresses are tensile and, correspondingly, core residual stresses are compressive, the fatigue crack fronts rapidly converge towards a quasi-straight shape. When surface residual stresses are compressive, with their corresponding tensile stresses in the core area, a preferential crack path also appears. Full article
Open AccessArticle Analysis of Fatigue Crack Paths in Cold Drawn Pearlitic Steel
Materials 2015, 8(11), 7439-7446; doi:10.3390/ma8115388
Received: 29 July 2015 / Revised: 26 October 2015 / Accepted: 29 October 2015 / Published: 4 November 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (7379 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, a fracto-metallographic analysis was performed on the cracked specimens of cold drawn pearlitic steel subjected to fatigue tests. Fatigue cracks are transcollonial and exhibit a preference for fracturing pearlitic lamellae, with non-uniform crack opening displacement values, micro-discontinuities, branchings, bifurcations and
[...] Read more.
In this paper, a fracto-metallographic analysis was performed on the cracked specimens of cold drawn pearlitic steel subjected to fatigue tests. Fatigue cracks are transcollonial and exhibit a preference for fracturing pearlitic lamellae, with non-uniform crack opening displacement values, micro-discontinuities, branchings, bifurcations and frequent local deflections that create microstructural roughness. At the micro-level, the cold drawn pearlitic steel exhibits higher micro-roughness than the hot rolled bar (this is a consequence of the manufacturing process by cold drawing), so that the actual fractured surface in the cold drawn wire is greater than that in the hot rolled bar, due to the fact that the crack deflection events are more frequent and with higher angle in the former (the heavily drawn prestressing steel wire). These findings show the relevant role on the manufacturing process by cold drawing in the fatigue crack propagation in pearlitic steel. Full article
Open AccessArticle Numerical Study of the Effects of Residual Stress on Fretting Fatigue Using XFEM
Materials 2015, 8(10), 7094-7105; doi:10.3390/ma8105365
Received: 10 August 2015 / Revised: 4 October 2015 / Accepted: 9 October 2015 / Published: 19 October 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Residual compressive stress can improve fretting fatigue strength. In this paper, the effects of residual stress on fretting fatigue of Al 2024-T351 alloy specimens are studied using a numerical approach. The extended finite element method combined with the cyclic cohesive zone model is
[...] Read more.
Residual compressive stress can improve fretting fatigue strength. In this paper, the effects of residual stress on fretting fatigue of Al 2024-T351 alloy specimens are studied using a numerical approach. The extended finite element method combined with the cyclic cohesive zone model is adopted to model fretting fatigue crack growth behavior. It is shown that residual stress changes the fretting fatigue crack growth path and enhances fretting fatigue life. Crack initiation angle, depth of knee point, crack initiation life, crack propagation life and total life are greater for specimens with residual stress compared to specimens without residual stress. The effects of residual stress are more remarkable for specimens with a high intensity of residual stress. However, the effects of residual stress reduce at a high bulk load level. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Fatigue Strength Improvement by CFRP Laminates and Shot Peening onto the Tension Flanges Joining Corrugated SteelWebs
Materials 2015, 8(8), 5348-5362; doi:10.3390/ma8085248
Received: 5 June 2015 / Revised: 4 August 2015 / Accepted: 12 August 2015 / Published: 19 August 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2290 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Corrugated steel web with inherent high out-of-plane stiffness has a promising application in configuring large span highway bridge girders. Due to the irregularity of the configuration details, the local stress concentration poses a major fatigue problem for the welded flange plates of high
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Corrugated steel web with inherent high out-of-plane stiffness has a promising application in configuring large span highway bridge girders. Due to the irregularity of the configuration details, the local stress concentration poses a major fatigue problem for the welded flange plates of high strength low alloy structural steels. In this work, the methods of applying CFRP laminate and shot peening onto the surfaces of the tension flanges were employed with the purpose of improving the fatigue strength of such configuration details. The effectiveness of this method in the improvement of fatigue strength has been examined experimentally. Test results show that the shot peening significantly increases hardness and roughness in contrast to these without treatment. Also, it has beneficial effects on the fatigue strength enhancement when compared against the test data of the joints with CFRP strengthening. The stiffness degradation during the loading progress is compared with each treatment. Incorporating the stress acting on the constituent parts of the CFRP laminates, a discussion is made regarding the mechanism of the retrofit and related influencing factors such as corrosion and economic cost. This work could enhance the understanding of the CFRP and shot peening in repairing such welded details and shed light on the reinforcement design of welded joints between corrugated steel webs and flange plates. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evaluation and Description of Friction between an Electro-Deposited Coating and a Ceramic Ball under Fretting Condition
Materials 2015, 8(8), 4778-4789; doi:10.3390/ma8084778
Received: 7 June 2015 / Revised: 22 July 2015 / Accepted: 23 July 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1454 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article describes fretting behavior of zirconia and silicon nitride balls on an electro-deposited coating. Fretting tests are performed using a ball-on-flat configuration. The evolution of the kinetic friction coefficient is determined, along with slip ratio. Experimental results show that the steady-state friction
[...] Read more.
This article describes fretting behavior of zirconia and silicon nitride balls on an electro-deposited coating. Fretting tests are performed using a ball-on-flat configuration. The evolution of the kinetic friction coefficient is determined, along with slip ratio. Experimental results show that the steady-state friction coefficient between ceramic balls (Si3N4 and ZrO2) and an electro-deposited coating is about 0.06, lower than the value between AISI 52100 ball and the coating. After a steady-state sliding, the transition of the friction coefficient is varied with a ball. The friction coefficient for ZrO2 balls became a critical value after higher fretting cycles than those for Si3N4 and AISI 52100 balls. In addition, it is identified that two parameters can describe the transition of the friction coefficient. Finally, the evolution of the friction coefficient is expressed as an exponential or a power-law form. Full article

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