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Special Issue "Latest Nanotechnology Research Output 2017—Select papers from Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference—ANNIC 2017"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (8 February 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Alexander N. Obraztsov

M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991, Russia; University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu 80101, Finland
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: carbon materials production, characterization and application; photonics; optoelectronics; vacuum electronics; nanotechnologies; nanodevices; optical spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference is an international meeting, and is organized in a different European country each year. The main target is to set up a major and attractive annual gatherings of experts, from all around the world, and from different nanotechnology fields.

The chairman and plenary speakers change each year in order to enrich the content and provide participants with different views. In order to maintain a high-quality conference, the reviewing process is done by an international scientific committee composed of experienced professors.

After the success of Paris (2015) and Barcelona (2016), the Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference 2017 will be held in Rome, 18–20 October.

During the previous editions, the conference succeeded in:

  • Attracting high-quality papers from different subfields.

  • Offering the opportunity to be updated on the latest research outputs in several nanotechnology and nanoscience topics.

  • Organizing specific workshops around the most attractive and current issues.

  • Gathering worldwide experts as conference speakers.

The covered fields during the previous editions were:

  • Nanoelectronics

  • Nanophotonics and nano-optics

  • Nanomaterials

  • Nanotechnology for energy and environment

  • Nanobiotechnology, nanomedicine and nanosafety

  • Nanocharacterization and nanomanufacturing

Prof. Alexander N. Obraztsov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Nanoelectronic components and devices

  • Metamaterials for optic and optoelectronic applications

  • Photonic and plasmonic nanomaterials

  • Optical properties of nanostructures

  • Sol-gel optical materials

  • Spectroscopy

  • Nanosensors

  • Polymer nanocomposites

  • Carbon and graphene nanostructures

  • Nanofluidics

  • Targeted drug delivery and nanocarriers

  • Tissue engineering and regenerative nanomedicine

  • Toxicology and risk assessment of nanomedicine systems

  • Nanocatalysis and applications in the chemical industry

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Light Trapping with Silicon Light Funnel Arrays
Materials 2018, 11(3), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030445
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 19 March 2018
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Abstract
Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF) arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of
[...] Read more.
Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF) arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of high-density complex Mie modes. Specifically, light funnel arrays exhibit broadband absorption enhancement of the solar spectrum. In the current study, we numerically explore the optical coupling between surface light funnel arrays and the underlying substrates. We show that the absorption in the LF array-substrate complex is higher than the absorption in LF arrays of the same height (~10% increase). This, we suggest, implies that a LF array serves as an efficient surface element that imparts additional momentum components to the impinging illumination, and hence optically excites the substrate by near-field light concentration, excitation of traveling guided modes in the substrate, and mode hybridization. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Optical Properties of Complex Plasmonic Materials Studied with Extended Effective Medium Theories Combined with Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis
Materials 2018, 11(3), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11030351
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
PDF Full-text (4462 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study we fabricate gold nanocomposites and model their optical properties. The nanocomposites are either homogeneous films or gratings containing gold nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix. The samples are fabricated using a recently developed technique making use of laser interferometry. The
[...] Read more.
In this study we fabricate gold nanocomposites and model their optical properties. The nanocomposites are either homogeneous films or gratings containing gold nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix. The samples are fabricated using a recently developed technique making use of laser interferometry. The gratings present original plasmon-enhanced diffraction properties. In this work, we develop a new approach to model the optical properties of our composites. We combine the extended Maxwell–Garnett model of effective media with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) method and compute both the absorption spectra and the diffraction efficiency spectra of the gratings. We show that such a semi-analytical approach allows us to reproduce the original plasmonic features of the composites and can provide us with details about their inner structure. Such an approach, considering reasonably high particle concentrations, could be a simple and efficient tool to study complex micro-structured system based on plasmonic components, such as metamaterials. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Tailoring Cu Nanoparticle Catalyst for Methanol Synthesis Using the Spinning Disk Reactor
Materials 2018, 11(1), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11010154
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 9 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
PDF Full-text (4184 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cu nanoparticles are known to be very active for methanol (MeOH) synthesis at relatively low temperatures, such that smaller particle sizes yield better MeOH productivity. We aimed to control Cu nanoparticle (NP) size and size distribution for catalysing MeOH synthesis, by using the
[...] Read more.
Cu nanoparticles are known to be very active for methanol (MeOH) synthesis at relatively low temperatures, such that smaller particle sizes yield better MeOH productivity. We aimed to control Cu nanoparticle (NP) size and size distribution for catalysing MeOH synthesis, by using the spinning disk reactor. The spinning disk reactor (SDR), which operates based on shear effect and plug flow in thin films, can be used to rapidly micro-mix reactants in order to control nucleation and particle growth for uniform particle size distribution. This could be achieved by varying both physical and chemical operation conditions in a precipitation reaction on the SDR. We have used the SDR for a Cu borohydride reduction to vary Cu NP size from 3 nm to about 55 nm. XRD and TEM characterization confirmed the presence of Cu2O and Cu crystallites when the samples were dried. This technique is readily scalable for Cu NP production by processing continuously over a longer duration than the small-scale tests. However, separation of the nanoparticles from solution posed a challenge as the suspension hardly settled. The Cu NPs produced were tested to be active catalyst for MeOH synthesis at low temperature and MeOH productivity increased with decreasing particle size. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle DFT Study on Intermetallic Pd–Cu Alloy with Cover Layer Pd as Efficient Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction
Materials 2018, 11(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11010033
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 26 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1787 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the adsorption energies (Ead) for oxygen on monolayer Pd on top of the Pd–Cu face-centered cubic (FCC) alloy and intermetallic B2 structure revealed a linear correspondence between the adsorption energies and the d-band
[...] Read more.
Detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the adsorption energies (Ead) for oxygen on monolayer Pd on top of the Pd–Cu face-centered cubic (FCC) alloy and intermetallic B2 structure revealed a linear correspondence between the adsorption energies and the d-band center position. The calculated barrier (Ebarrier) for oxygen dissociation depends linearly on the reaction energy difference (ΔE). The O2 has a stronger adsorption strength and smaller barrier on the intermetallic Pd–Cu surface than on its FCC alloy surface. The room-temperature free energy (ΔG) analysis suggests the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) pathways proceed by a direct dissociation mechanism instead of hydrogenation into OOH. These results might be of use in designing intermetallic Pd–Cu as ORR electrocatalysts. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Development of Highly Repellent Silica Particles for Protection of Hemp Shiv Used as Insulation Materials
Materials 2018, 11(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11010004
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 15 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7378 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New bio-materials have recently gained interest for use in insulation panels in walls, but wider adoption by the building industry is hindered by their intrinsic properties. The fact that such materials are mainly composed of cellulose makes them combustible, and their hydrophilic surface
[...] Read more.
New bio-materials have recently gained interest for use in insulation panels in walls, but wider adoption by the building industry is hindered by their intrinsic properties. The fact that such materials are mainly composed of cellulose makes them combustible, and their hydrophilic surface presents a high water uptake, which would lead to faster biodegradation. A hydrophobic treatment with silica particles was successfully synthesised via Stöber process, characterised, and deposited on hemp shiv. The surface of hemp shiv coated several times with 45 and 120 nm particles were uniformly covered, as well as extensively water repellent. Those samples could withstand in humidity chamber without loss of their hydrophobic property and no sign of mould growth after 72 h of exposure. Full article
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