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Special Issue "Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Azizur Rahman

Department of Physical & Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Marine collagen, Marine chitin, Medicinal chemistry, Marine skeletal proteins, biomineralization, biominerals, marine invertebrates, Marine/freshwater algae, soft corals, sclerites, proteomics
Guest Editor
Dr. Tiago H. Silva

3B's Research Group in Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Marine biomaterials; valorization of marine resources and by-products; marine biotechnology; Bioinspired materials; tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Collagen is the main fibrous structural protein in the extracellular matrix and connective tissue of animals. It is a primary building block of bones, tendons, skin, hair, nails, cartilage, and all joints in the body. It is also considered a "glue” that holds the body together. The production of collagen begins to slow down and cell structures start losing their strength as we get older. Supplementing with collagen is a vital way to help our body revive and stay youthful. Recently, collagen-based biomedical materials have developed an important and clinically effective materials that have gained wide acceptance. However, collagen extraction from land animal source is complex, time consuming and expensive. Hence, marine sources have started to be researched and found to be the most convenient and safest source for obtaining collagen. Another reason for favouring this source is due to the concern over adverse inflammatory and immunologic response and prevalence of various diseases among land animals which causes health complications.

Marine source has also got plenty advantages over the land animal sources such as: (1) High content of collagen; (2) environment friendly; (3) presence of biological contaminants and toxins almost negligible; (4) low inflammatory response; (5) greater absorption due to low molecular weight; (6) less significant religious and ethical constrains; (7) minor regulatory and quality control problems; (8) metabolically compatible, and much more. This source includes the use of marine invertebrates and vertebrates, such as sponges, coralline red algae, sea urchin, octopus, squid, jellyfish, cuttlefish, star fish, sea anemone, and prawn. Therefore, a huge source of marine collagen is expected to make a great contribution to marine biotechnology products and medical applications.

As a Guest Editor of this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, I invite you to submit recent advances in all the aspects of marine collagen, including original work or reviews and new innovations on the biological sources and their promising applications in medical and related fields.

Dr. Azizur Rahman
Dr. Tiago H. Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Collagen

  • Chitin

  • Marine skeletal proteins

  • Biominerals

  • Marine biotechnology

  • Marine Biomaterials

  • Corals

  • Sponges

  • Biomedical applications

  • Marine algae

  • Proteomics

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Collagen from Cartilaginous Fish By-Products for a Potential Application in Bioactive Film Composite
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(6), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16060211
Received: 2 May 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
The acid solubilised collagen (ASC) and pepsin solubilised collagen (PSC) were extracted from the by-products (skin) of a cartilaginous fish (Mustelus mustelus). The ASC and PSC yields were 23.07% and 35.27% dry weight, respectively and were identified as collagen Type I
[...] Read more.
The acid solubilised collagen (ASC) and pepsin solubilised collagen (PSC) were extracted from the by-products (skin) of a cartilaginous fish (Mustelus mustelus). The ASC and PSC yields were 23.07% and 35.27% dry weight, respectively and were identified as collagen Type I with the presence of α, β and γ chains. As revealed by the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra analysis, pepsin did not alter the PSC triple helix structure. Based on the various type of collagen yield, only PSC was used in combination with chitosan to produce a composite film. Such film had lower tensile strength but higher elongation at break when compared to chitosan film; and lower water solubility and lightness when compared to collagen film. Equally, FTIR spectra analysis of film composite showed the occurrence of collagen-chitosan interaction resulting in a modification of the secondary structure of collagen. Collagen-chitosan-based biofilm showed a potential UV barrier properties and antioxidant activity, which might be used as green bioactive films to preserve nutraceutical products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Production, Characterization and Biocompatibility Evaluation of Collagen Membranes Derived from Marine Sponge Chondrosia reniformis Nardo, 1847
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(4), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16040111
Received: 12 March 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 29 March 2018
PDF Full-text (47826 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Collagen is involved in the formation of complex fibrillar networks, providing the structural integrity of tissues. Its low immunogenicity and mechanical properties make this molecule a biomaterial that is extremely suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies in human health issues.
[...] Read more.
Collagen is involved in the formation of complex fibrillar networks, providing the structural integrity of tissues. Its low immunogenicity and mechanical properties make this molecule a biomaterial that is extremely suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies in human health issues. Here, for the first time, we performed a thorough screening of four different methods to obtain sponge collagenous fibrillar suspensions (FSs) from C. reniformis demosponge, which were then chemically, physically, and biologically characterized, in terms of protein, collagen, and glycosaminoglycans content, viscous properties, biocompatibility, and antioxidant activity. These four FSs were then tested for their capability to generate crosslinked or not thin sponge collagenous membranes (SCMs) that are suitable for TERM purposes. Two types of FSs, of the four tested, were able to generate SCMs, either from crosslinking or not, and showed good mechanical properties, enzymatic degradation resistance, water binding capacity, antioxidant activity, and biocompatibility on both fibroblast and keratinocyte cell cultures. Finally, our results demonstrate that it is possible to adapt the extraction procedure in order to alternatively improve the mechanical properties or the antioxidant performances of the derived biomaterial, depending on the application requirements, thanks to the versatility of C. reniformis extracellular matrix extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Unique Collagen Fibers for Biomedical Applications
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16040102
Received: 15 February 2018 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 17 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
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Abstract
The challenge to develop grafts for tissue regeneration lies in the need to obtain a scaffold that will promote cell growth in order to form new tissue at a trauma-damaged site. Scaffolds also need to provide compatible mechanical properties that will support the
[...] Read more.
The challenge to develop grafts for tissue regeneration lies in the need to obtain a scaffold that will promote cell growth in order to form new tissue at a trauma-damaged site. Scaffolds also need to provide compatible mechanical properties that will support the new tissue and facilitate the desired physiological activity. Here, we used natural materials to develop a bio-composite made of unique collagen embedded in an alginate hydrogel material. The collagen fibers used to create the building blocks exhibited a unique hyper-elastic behavior similar to that of natural human tissue. The prominent mechanical properties, along with the support of cell adhesion affects cell shape and supports their proliferation, consequently facilitating the formation of a new tissue-like structure. The current study elaborates on these unique collagen fibers, focusing on their structure and biocompatibility, in an in vitro model. The findings suggest it as a highly appropriate material for biomedical applications. The promising in vitro results indicate that the distinctive collagen fibers could serve as a scaffold that can be adapted for tissue regeneration, in support of healing processes, along with maintaining tissue mechanical properties for the new regenerate tissue formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Biphasic Scaffolds from Marine Collagens for Regeneration of Osteochondral Defects
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(3), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16030091
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 10 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
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Abstract
Background: Collagens of marine origin are applied increasingly as alternatives to mammalian collagens in tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to develop a biphasic scaffold from exclusively marine collagens supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation and to find a suitable
[...] Read more.
Background: Collagens of marine origin are applied increasingly as alternatives to mammalian collagens in tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to develop a biphasic scaffold from exclusively marine collagens supporting both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation and to find a suitable setup for in vitro chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stroma cells (hMSC). Methods: Biphasic scaffolds from biomimetically mineralized salmon collagen and fibrillized jellyfish collagen were fabricated by joint freeze-drying and crosslinking. Different experiments were performed to analyze the influence of cell density and TGF-β on osteogenic differentiation of the cells in the scaffolds. Gene expression analysis and analysis of cartilage extracellular matrix components were performed and activity of alkaline phosphatase was determined. Furthermore, histological sections of differentiated cells in the biphasic scaffolds were analyzed. Results: Stable biphasic scaffolds from two different marine collagens were prepared. An in vitro setup for osteochondral differentiation was developed involving (1) different seeding densities in the phases; (2) additional application of alginate hydrogel in the chondral part; (3) pre-differentiation and sequential seeding of the scaffolds and (4) osteochondral medium. Spatially separated osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of hMSC was achieved in this setup, while osteochondral medium in combination with the biphasic scaffolds alone was not sufficient to reach this ambition. Conclusions: Biphasic, but monolithic scaffolds from exclusively marine collagens are suitable for the development of osteochondral constructs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Optimization of Extraction Conditions and Characterization of Pepsin-Solubilised Collagen from Skin of Giant Croaker (Nibea japonica)
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010029
Received: 27 December 2017 / Revised: 6 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 14 January 2018
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Abstract
In the present study, response surface methodology was performed to investigate the effects of extraction parameters on pepsin-solubilised collagen (PSC) from the skin of the giant croaker Nibea japonica. The optimum extraction conditions of PSC were as follows: concentration of pepsin was
[...] Read more.
In the present study, response surface methodology was performed to investigate the effects of extraction parameters on pepsin-solubilised collagen (PSC) from the skin of the giant croaker Nibea japonica. The optimum extraction conditions of PSC were as follows: concentration of pepsin was 1389 U/g, solid-liquid ratio was 1:57 and hydrolysis time was 8.67 h. Under these conditions, the extraction yield of PSC was up to 84.85%, which is well agreement with the predict value of 85.03%. The PSC from Nibea japonica skin was then characterized as type I collagen by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The fourier transforms infrared spetroscopy (FTIR) analysis revealed that PSC maintains its triple-helical structure by the hydrogen bond. All PSCs were soluble in the pH range of 1.0–4.0 and decreases in solubility were observed at neutral or alkaline conditions. All PSCs had a decrease in solubility in the presence of sodium chloride, especially with a concentration above 2%. So, the Nibea japonica skin could serve as another potential source of collagen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Bioinspiring Chondrosia reniformis (Nardo, 1847) Collagen-Based Hydrogel: A New Extraction Method to Obtain a Sticky and Self-Healing Collagenous Material
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(12), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15120380
Received: 30 September 2017 / Revised: 28 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3728 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Collagen is a natural and abundant polymer that serves multiple functions in both invertebrates and vertebrates. As collagen is the natural scaffolding for cells, collagen-based hydrogels are regarded as ideal materials for tissue engineering applications since they can mimic the natural cellular microenvironment.
[...] Read more.
Collagen is a natural and abundant polymer that serves multiple functions in both invertebrates and vertebrates. As collagen is the natural scaffolding for cells, collagen-based hydrogels are regarded as ideal materials for tissue engineering applications since they can mimic the natural cellular microenvironment. Chondrosia reniformis is a marine demosponge particularly rich in collagen, characterized by the presence of labile interfibrillar crosslinks similarly to those described in the mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs) of echinoderms. As a result single fibrils can be isolated using calcium-chelating and disulphide-reducing chemicals. In the present work we firstly describe a new extraction method that directly produces a highly hydrated hydrogel with interesting self-healing properties. The materials obtained were then biochemically and rheologically characterized. Our investigation has shown that the developed extraction procedure is able to extract collagen as well as other proteins and Glycosaminoglycans (GAG)-like molecules that give the collagenous hydrogel interesting and new rheological properties when compared to other described collagenous materials. The present work motivates further in-depth investigations towards the development of a new class of injectable collagenous hydrogels with tailored specifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Collagen from the Marine Sponges Axinella cannabina and Suberites carnosus: Isolation and Morphological, Biochemical, and Biophysical Characterization
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(6), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15060152
Received: 22 April 2017 / Revised: 22 April 2017 / Accepted: 25 May 2017 / Published: 29 May 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2337 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In search of alternative and safer sources of collagen for biomedical applications, the marine demosponges Axinella cannabina and Suberites carnosus, collected from the Aegean and the Ionian Seas, respectively, were comparatively studied for their insoluble collagen, intercellular collagen, and spongin-like collagen content.
[...] Read more.
In search of alternative and safer sources of collagen for biomedical applications, the marine demosponges Axinella cannabina and Suberites carnosus, collected from the Aegean and the Ionian Seas, respectively, were comparatively studied for their insoluble collagen, intercellular collagen, and spongin-like collagen content. The isolated collagenous materials were morphologically, physicochemically, and biophysically characterized. Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the fibrous morphology of the isolated collagens was confirmed, whereas the amino acid analysis, in conjunction with infrared spectroscopy studies, verified the characteristic for the collagen amino acid profile and its secondary structure. Furthermore, the isoelectric point and thermal behavior were determined by titration and differential scanning calorimetry, in combination with circular dichroism spectroscopic studies, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Collagens of Poriferan Origin
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16030079
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 3 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 3 March 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4914 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The biosynthesis, structural diversity, and functionality of collagens of sponge origin are still paradigms and causes of scientific controversy. This review has the ambitious goal of providing thorough and comprehensive coverage of poriferan collagens as a multifaceted topic with intriguing hypotheses and numerous
[...] Read more.
The biosynthesis, structural diversity, and functionality of collagens of sponge origin are still paradigms and causes of scientific controversy. This review has the ambitious goal of providing thorough and comprehensive coverage of poriferan collagens as a multifaceted topic with intriguing hypotheses and numerous challenging open questions. The structural diversity, chemistry, and biochemistry of collagens in sponges are analyzed and discussed here. Special attention is paid to spongins, collagen IV-related proteins, fibrillar collagens from demosponges, and collagens from glass sponge skeletal structures. The review also focuses on prospects and trends in applications of sponge collagens for technology, materials science and biomedicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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Open AccessReview Facial Bone Reconstruction Using both Marine or Non-Marine Bone Substitutes: Evaluation of Current Outcomes in a Systematic Literature Review
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010027
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 12 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 13 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (472 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present investigation was to systematically analyse the literature on the facial bone reconstruction defect using marine collagen or not and to evaluate a predictable treatment for their clinical management. The revision has been performed by searched MEDLINE and EMBASE
[...] Read more.
The aim of the present investigation was to systematically analyse the literature on the facial bone reconstruction defect using marine collagen or not and to evaluate a predictable treatment for their clinical management. The revision has been performed by searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2007 to 2017. Clinical trials and animal in vitro studies that had reported the application of bone substitutes or not for bone reconstruction defect and using marine collagen or other bone substitute material were recorded following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The first selection involved 1201 citations. After screening and evaluation of suitability, 39 articles were added at the revision process. Numerous discrepancies among the papers about bone defects morphology, surgical protocols, and selection of biomaterials were found. All selected manuscripts considered the final clinical success after the facial bone reconstruction applying bone substitutes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the vantage of the appliance of a biomaterial versus autologous bone still remains debated. Marine collagen seems to favor the dimensional stability of the graft and it could be an excellent carrier for growth factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collagen from Marine Biological Source and Medical Applications)
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