Special Issue "Wear Resistant Materials"

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Diego Martinez-Martinez

Center of Physics, University of Minho, Guimaraes, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: tribology, protection, wear, friction, mechanical properties, hardness, toughness, coatings, deposition on flexible substrates, thin films, self-lubrication, nanomaterials, nanocomposites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A recent study [1] calculated that 20% of the world energy consumption is used to overcome friction, and 3% to repair damages caused by wear. In addition, wear reduces the lifetime of devices and leads to their ultimate failure. Therefore, the development of new materials and solutions to reduce friction and wear have a large importance in the development of a sustainable economic growth.

Strategies for protection and design of new materials to control and minimize wear are often guided by trial-and-error approaches, while well stablished ground science is sometimes missing. The reason for this is the complexity of the mechanisms that take place, which include factors like the mechanical properties of the materials (e.g., hardness, toughness), presence of self-lubricating compounds, influence of the environment, geometry, operation conditions, presence of corrosion, etc. In addition, all these factors are influenced by the nano- and micro-structures of the materials involved.

The current Special Issue is devoted to the latest developments concerning wear resistant materials. Emphasis will be put in revealing the parameters playing a critical role in such behaviour and the description of the underlying operation mechanisms.

[1] Holmberg, K.; Erdemir, A. Influence of tribology on global energy consumption, costs and emissions. Friction 2017, 5, 263–284.

Dr. Diego Martinez-Martinez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wear
  • Protection
  • Friction
  • Nanostructures
  • Mechanism
  • Mechanical Properties
  • Tribology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Lubrication Performance of α-Zirconium Phosphates as an Anti-Wear Additive in Vegetable Oil-Based Anhydrous Calcium Grease
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
Vegetable oil has significant potential as a base oil, and substitute for mineral oil in grease formulation due to its biodegradability, low toxicity and excellent lubrication. This paper studied the development of vegetable oil-based greases with α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O
[...] Read more.
Vegetable oil has significant potential as a base oil, and substitute for mineral oil in grease formulation due to its biodegradability, low toxicity and excellent lubrication. This paper studied the development of vegetable oil-based greases with α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O (α-ZrP) as an additive, exploring base oil influence in tribological behavior. The results demonstrated that the addition of α-ZrP in vegetable-based greases is beneficial to anti-wear property. α-ZrP particles exhibit good performance in anti-wear, friction-reduction and load-carrying capacity, and its tribological performances are better than the normally used molybdenum disulfide and graphite additives. Owing to its superior tribological properties as a vegetable oil-based grease additive, α-ZrP holds great potential for use in environmentally friendly applications in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wear Resistant Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Synergistic Effect of Nanodiamond and Phosphate Ester Anti-Wear Additive Blends
Received: 20 May 2018 / Revised: 5 June 2018 / Accepted: 13 June 2018 / Published: 18 June 2018
PDF Full-text (3716 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanodiamonds are known to improve tribological performance when added to lubricants, but their impact on additives that may already be present in the lubricant is poorly documented. Here, we report on a study of their effects on thermal reaction films formed from tricresyl
[...] Read more.
Nanodiamonds are known to improve tribological performance when added to lubricants, but their impact on additives that may already be present in the lubricant is poorly documented. Here, we report on a study of their effects on thermal reaction films formed from tricresyl phosphate (TCP) on Fe substrates immersed in a dibasic ester basestock when blended with TCP. Thermal reaction film formation temperatures were recorded in-situ by monitoring the reaction film formation on both Fe and air baked Fe surfaces using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The nanodiamonds were found to raise the thermal reaction film formation temperature by 18 °C, possibly by raising the activation energy for the reaction, but they were not observed to affect the thickness or rate of formation of the films. The nanodiamonds, moreover, were observed to trigger thermal reaction film formation on air baked Fe surfaces that otherwise were highly resistance to reaction film formation. The surface morphology, roughness, and thickness of the thermal reaction films, as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), are reported as well as their chemical compositions, as studied with Electron Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The coefficients of friction measured on the thermal reaction films during dry solid–solid contact are also reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wear Resistant Materials)
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