Special Issue "Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction"

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A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jeffrey L. Streator

G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: 1 404 385 8535
Interests: contact mechanics; capillarity; thin film flows; friction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the more challenging problems in the field of tribology is also one of the most fundamental: how to model the sliding process. A simple macroscopic perspective assigns static and kinetic friction coefficients to the interface of contacting bodies and uses these two constants to predict sliding behavior, including the forces required to initiate slip, as well as the forces that arise during slip. However, this perspective obscures the myriad of small-scale interactions that ultimately give rise to the macroscopically observed coefficients of friction. Moreover, our lack of a detailed understanding of frictional interactions limits our ability to design systems that effectively utilize friction and/or mitigate the negative effects of sliding (such as wear and noise). Papers are solicited that provide numerical simulations of one body sliding over another body or, alternatively, that model resistance to sliding (i.e., static friction). Such papers may consider interactions occurring over one or more length scales, which can range from the atomic-level to geologic dimensions. Of particular interest are papers that integrate local interactions to predict global behavior and that incorporate one or more of the following features: surface topography, elastic deformation, plastic deformation, adhesion, intermolecular forces, elastic vibrations, and stick-slip behavior.

Dr. Jeffrey L. Streator
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • sliding
  • friction
  • static friction
  • kinetic friction
  • numerical simulation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Experimental and Numerical Simulation of the Dynamic Frictional Contact between an Aircraft Tire Rubber and a Rough Surface
Lubricants 2016, 4(3), 29; doi:10.3390/lubricants4030029
Received: 15 January 2016 / Revised: 30 June 2016 / Accepted: 21 July 2016 / Published: 17 August 2016
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Abstract
This paper presents a numerical simulation of an aircraft tire in contact with a rough surface using a variable friction coefficient dependent on temperature and contact pressure. A sliding facility was used in order to evaluate this dependence of the friction coefficient. The
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This paper presents a numerical simulation of an aircraft tire in contact with a rough surface using a variable friction coefficient dependent on temperature and contact pressure. A sliding facility was used in order to evaluate this dependence of the friction coefficient. The temperature diffusion throughout the tire cross-section was measured by means of thermocouples. Both frictional heating and temperature diffusion were compared to numerical two- and three- dimensional simulations. An adequate temperature prediction could be obtained. In future simulations, wear should be taken into account in order to have a more accurate simulation especially in the case of high pressures and slipping velocities. A 3D finite element model for a rolling tire at a velocity of 37.79 knots (19.44 m/s) and in a cornering phase was investigated using a variable friction coefficient dependent on temperature and pressure. The numerical simulation tended to predict the temperature of the tire tread after a few seconds of rolling in skidding position, the temperature of the contact zone increases to 140 °C. Further investigations must be carried out in order to obtain the evolution of the temperature observed experimentally. The authors would like to point out that for confidentiality reasons, certain numerical data could not be revealed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction)
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Open AccessArticle A Generic Friction Model for Radial Slider Bearing Simulation Considering Elastic and Plastic Deformation
Lubricants 2015, 3(3), 522-538; doi:10.3390/lubricants3030522
Received: 3 February 2015 / Revised: 8 June 2015 / Accepted: 23 June 2015 / Published: 30 June 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (976 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The investigation of component dynamics is one of the main tasks of internal combustion engine (ICE) simulation. This prediction is important in order to understand complex loading conditions, which happen in a running ICE. Due to the need for fuel saving, mechanical friction,
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The investigation of component dynamics is one of the main tasks of internal combustion engine (ICE) simulation. This prediction is important in order to understand complex loading conditions, which happen in a running ICE. Due to the need for fuel saving, mechanical friction, in particular in radial slider bearings, is one important investigation target. A generic friction modeling approach for radial slider bearings, which can be applied to lubricated contact regimes, will be presented in this paper. Besides viscous friction, the approach considers in particular boundary friction. The parameterization of the friction model is done using surface material and surface roughness measurement data. Furthermore, fluid properties depending on the applied oil additives are being considered. The application of the model will be demonstrated for a typical engineering task of a connecting rod big end study to outline the effects of contact surface texture. AlSn-based and polymer coated bearing shells will be analyzed and compared with respect to friction reduction effects, running-in behavior and thermal load capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction)
Open AccessArticle An Insight to High Humidity-Caused Friction Modulation of Brake by Numerical Modeling of Dynamic Meniscus under Shearing
Lubricants 2015, 3(2), 437-446; doi:10.3390/lubricants3020437
Received: 17 October 2014 / Revised: 8 April 2015 / Accepted: 29 April 2015 / Published: 19 May 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (863 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To obtain an insight to high humidity-caused friction modulation in brake pad-rotor interface, the adhesion phenomenon due to a liquid bridge is simulated using an advanced particle method by varying the shearing speed of the interface. The method, called generalized interpolation material point
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To obtain an insight to high humidity-caused friction modulation in brake pad-rotor interface, the adhesion phenomenon due to a liquid bridge is simulated using an advanced particle method by varying the shearing speed of the interface. The method, called generalized interpolation material point for fluid-solid interactions (GIMP-FSI), was recently developed from the material point method (MPM) for fluid-solid interactions at small scales where surface tension dominates, thus suitable for studying the partially wet brake friction due to high humidity at a scale of 10 m. Dynamic capillary effects due to surface tension and contact angles are simulated. Adhesion forces calculated by GIMP-FSI are consistent with those from the existing approximate meniscus models. Moreover, the numerical results show that capillary effects induce modulations of adhesion as slip speed changes. In particular, the adhesion modulation could be above 30% at low speed. This finding provides insights into how the high humidity-caused friction could cause modulations of brake, which are unable to be achieved by conventional models. Therefore, the numerical analysis helps to elucidate the complex friction mechanisms associated with brakes that are exposed to high humidity environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction)
Open AccessArticle How Does Dissipation Affect the Transition from Static to Dynamic Macroscopic Friction?
Lubricants 2015, 3(2), 311-331; doi:10.3390/lubricants3020311
Received: 14 October 2014 / Revised: 8 December 2014 / Accepted: 12 February 2015 / Published: 16 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (742 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Description of the transitional process from a static to a dynamic frictional regime is a fundamental problem of modern physics. Previously, we developed a model based on the well-known Frenkel-Kontorova model to describe dry macroscopic friction. Here, this model has been modified to
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Description of the transitional process from a static to a dynamic frictional regime is a fundamental problem of modern physics. Previously, we developed a model based on the well-known Frenkel-Kontorova model to describe dry macroscopic friction. Here, this model has been modified to include the effect of dissipation in derived relations between the kinematic and dynamic parameters of a transition process. The main (somewhat counterintuitive) result is a demonstration that the rupture (i.e., detachment front) velocity of the slip pulse which arises during the transition does not depend on friction. The only parameter (besides the elastic and plastic properties of the medium) controlling the rupture velocity is the shear to normal stress ratio. In contrast to the rupture velocity, the slip velocity does depend on friction. The model we have developed describes these processes over a wide range of rupture and slip velocities (up to 7 orders of magnitude) allowing, in particular, the consideration of seismic events ranging from regular earthquakes, with rupture velocities on the order of a few km/s, to slow slip events, with rupture velocities of a few km/day. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction)
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Open AccessArticle Numerical Treatments of Slipping/No-Slip Zones in Cold Rolling of Thin Sheets with Heavy Roll Deformation
Lubricants 2015, 3(2), 113-131; doi:10.3390/lubricants3020113
Received: 22 December 2014 / Revised: 13 February 2015 / Accepted: 6 March 2015 / Published: 2 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (914 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the thin sheet cold rolling manufacturing process, a major issue is roll elastic deformation and its impact on roll load, torque and contact stresses. As in many systems implying mechanical contact under high loading, a central part is under “sticking friction” (no
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In the thin sheet cold rolling manufacturing process, a major issue is roll elastic deformation and its impact on roll load, torque and contact stresses. As in many systems implying mechanical contact under high loading, a central part is under “sticking friction” (no slip) while both extremities do slip to accommodate the material acceleration of the rolled metal sheet. This is a crucial point for modeling of such rolling processes and the numerical treatment of contact and friction (“regularized” or not), of the transition between these zones, does have an impact on the results. Two ways to deal with it are compared (regularization of the stick/slip transition, direct imposition of a no-slip condition) and recommendations are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Numerical Simulation of Static and Dynamic Friction)
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