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Special Issue "Internet of Things: Technologies and Applications"

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A special issue of Journal of Sensor and Actuator Networks (ISSN 2224-2708).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Feng Xia (Website)

School of Software, Dalian University of Technology, Development Zone, Dalian 116620, China
Interests: cyber-physical systems; internet of things; mobile computing; social computing; intelligent systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Internet of Things has become a very hot research topic, which is projected to have a high impact in the development of innovative technologies that will lead the near future. These technologies are opening tremendous opportunities for a large number of novel applications that promise to improve the quality of our lives.

This special issue aims to gather latest research and development achievements in the field of Internet of Things. Original papers that address the most current issues and challenges are solicited. Authors of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Cyber, Physical and Social Computing (CPSCom 2011; http://cpscom.org and the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Internet of Things (iThings 2011; http://ieee-iot.org) are invited to submit extended versions of their papers to this special issue for consideration. Manuscripts from the conferences must have at least 40% extension compared with the conference versions.

Dr. Feng Xia
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • architecture and infrastructure
  • system design, modeling and evaluation
  • ubiquitous sensing
  • networks and communications
  • intelligent data processing
  • ubiquitous/pervasive computing
  • cyber-physical systems and society
  • reliability, security, privacy and trust
  • applications, business and social issues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Adaptive Communication Techniques for the Internet of Things
J. Sens. Actuator Netw. 2013, 2(1), 122-155; doi:10.3390/jsan2010122
Received: 16 January 2013 / Revised: 16 February 2013 / Accepted: 28 February 2013 / Published: 6 March 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (534 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The vision for the Internet of Things (IoT) demands that material objects acquire communications and computation capabilities and become able to automatically identify themselves through standard protocols and open systems, using the Internet as their foundation. Yet, several challenges still must be [...] Read more.
The vision for the Internet of Things (IoT) demands that material objects acquire communications and computation capabilities and become able to automatically identify themselves through standard protocols and open systems, using the Internet as their foundation. Yet, several challenges still must be addressed for this vision to become a reality. A core ingredient in such development is the ability of heterogeneous devices to communicate adaptively so as to make the best of limited spectrum availability and cope with competition which is inevitable as more and more objects connect to the system. This survey provides an overview of current developments in this area, placing emphasis on wireless sensor networks that can provide IoT capabilities for material objects and techniques that can be used in the context of systems employing low-power versions of the Internet Protocol (IP) stack. The survey introduces a conceptual model that facilitates the identification of opportunities for adaptation in each layer of the network stack. After a detailed discussion of specific approaches applicable to particular layers, we consider how sharing information across layers can facilitate further adaptation. We conclude with a discussion of future research directions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet of Things: Technologies and Applications)
Open AccessArticle Estimation of Physical Layer Performance in WSNs Exploiting the Method of Indirect Observations
J. Sens. Actuator Netw. 2012, 1(3), 272-298; doi:10.3390/jsan1030272
Received: 15 September 2012 / Revised: 2 November 2012 / Accepted: 15 November 2012 / Published: 30 November 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are used in many industrial and consumer applications that are increasingly gaining impact in our day to day lives. Still great efforts are needed towards the definition of methodologies for their effective management. One big issue is themonitoring [...] Read more.
Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are used in many industrial and consumer applications that are increasingly gaining impact in our day to day lives. Still great efforts are needed towards the definition of methodologies for their effective management. One big issue is themonitoring of the network status, which requires the definition of the performance indicators and methodologies and should be accurate and not intrusive at the same time. In this paper, we present a new process for the monitoring of the physical layer in WSNs making use of a completely passive methodology. From data sniffed by external nodes, we first estimate the position of the nodes by applying the Weighted Least Squares (WLS) to the method of indirect observations. The resulting node positions are then used to estimate the status of the communication links using the most appropriate propagation model. We performed a significant number of measurements on the field in both indoor and outdoor environments. From the experiments, we were able to achieve an accurate estimation of the channel links status with an average error lower than 1 dB, which is around 5 dB lower than the error introduced without the application of the proposed method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet of Things: Technologies and Applications)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Sensor Mania! The Internet of Things, Wearable Computing, Objective Metrics, and the Quantified Self 2.0
J. Sens. Actuator Netw. 2012, 1(3), 217-253; doi:10.3390/jsan1030217
Received: 4 September 2012 / Revised: 31 October 2012 / Accepted: 31 October 2012 / Published: 8 November 2012
Cited by 107 | PDF Full-text (933 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The number of devices on the Internet exceeded the number of people on the Internet in 2008, and is estimated to reach 50 billion in 2020. A wide-ranging Internet of Things (IOT) ecosystem is emerging to support the process of connecting real-world [...] Read more.
The number of devices on the Internet exceeded the number of people on the Internet in 2008, and is estimated to reach 50 billion in 2020. A wide-ranging Internet of Things (IOT) ecosystem is emerging to support the process of connecting real-world objects like buildings, roads, household appliances, and human bodies to the Internet via sensors and microprocessor chips that record and transmit data such as sound waves, temperature, movement, and other variables. The explosion in Internet-connected sensors means that new classes of technical capability and application are being created. More granular 24/7 quantified monitoring is leading to a deeper understanding of the internal and external worlds encountered by humans. New data literacy behaviors such as correlation assessment, anomaly detection, and high-frequency data processing are developing as humans adapt to the different kinds of data flows enabled by the IOT. The IOT ecosystem has four critical functional steps: data creation, information generation, meaning-making, and action-taking. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the current and rapidly emerging ecosystem of the Internet of Things (IOT). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Internet of Things: Technologies and Applications)
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