Special Issue "Mobile Health"

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A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maged N. Kamel Boulos

University of the Highlands and Islands / Oilthigh na Gàidhealtachd agus nan Eilean, The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Elgin, Moray, IV30 1JJ, Scotland, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 01343 576830
Interests: medical and health informatics; including telehealthcare/eHealth; geographic informatics; 3D virtual worlds and virtual globes (mirror worlds); web 2.0; e-learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of JPM is dedicated to the field mHealth (mobile health) and its applications (including 'mobile apps'). Mobile health refers to using small form-factor, Internet-enabled devices, such as feature phones, smartphones, PDAs (personal digital assistants)/palmtops and tablets, in the professional practice of clinical medicine and public health. The applications also extend to supporting clinical students (undergraduates and postgraduates) in their education and CPD (continuing professional development), as well as supporting lay people (patients, carers and the wider general public) in various scenarios related to health, lifestyle management and disease, particularly long-term (chronic) conditions. We welcome manuscripts addressing this important topic of mHealth and any of its various applications and apps, including papers investigating design and user acceptance issues (for various end user groups/age groups, etc.), papers reporting the development of novel mHealth systems and services, evaluation studies, papers on mHealth in low-resource settings, etc.

Dr. Maged N. Kamel Boulos
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • mHealth
  • apps
  • smartphones
  • tablets
  • iPad
  • Internet
  • SMS

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Impact of Information Technology on the Therapy of Type-1 Diabetes: A Case Study of Children and Adolescents in Germany
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 200-217; doi:10.3390/jpm4020200
Received: 13 January 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2014 / Accepted: 1 April 2014 / Published: 16 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Being able to manage and adjust insulin doses is a key part of managing type-1 diabetes. Children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus often have serious difficulties with this dosage adjustment. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the impact of using novel mobile,
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Being able to manage and adjust insulin doses is a key part of managing type-1 diabetes. Children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus often have serious difficulties with this dosage adjustment. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the impact of using novel mobile, web and communication technologies in assisting their therapy and treatment. A trial was conducted in the north-eastern part of Germany to evaluate the impact of the “Mobil Diab”, a mobile diabetes management system, on the clinical outcome. 68 subjects aged between 8 and 18 years, divided randomly into control and intervention groups, were included into the study. Metrics such as changes in the quality of metabolic control, changes in psychological parameters, usability and acceptance of the technology were used for evaluation purpose. Metabolic control was mainly assessed by the mean HbAlc. Analysis showed a good acceptance of the proposed system. An overall improvement in mean levels of HbA1c was observed, however further studies will be conducted to prove evidence of the weight and BMI improvements. Moreover, initial indications of positive impact on the improvement in psychological parameters were presumed based on the result of the conducted study. The system appeared to be an efficient and time saving tool in diabetes management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)
Open AccessArticle Cardiovascular Disease Self-Management: Pilot Testing of an mHealth Healthy Eating Program
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(1), 88-101; doi:10.3390/jpm4010088
Received: 13 January 2014 / Revised: 28 February 2014 / Accepted: 28 February 2014 / Published: 19 March 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (647 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is crucial in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet attendance is poor. Mobile technology (mHealth) offers a potential solution to increase reach of CR. This paper presents two development studies to determine mobile phone usage in adults with CVD
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Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is crucial in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet attendance is poor. Mobile technology (mHealth) offers a potential solution to increase reach of CR. This paper presents two development studies to determine mobile phone usage in adults with CVD and to evaluate the acceptability of an mHealth healthy eating CR program. Methods: CR attendees were surveyed to determine mobile phone usage rates. A second single-subject pilot study investigated perceptions of a 4-week theory-based healthy eating mHealth program and explored pre-post changes in self-efficacy. Results: 74 adults with CVD completed the survey (50/74 male; mean age 63 ± 10). Nearly all had mobile phones (70/74; 95%) and used the Internet (69/74; 93%), and most were interested in receiving CR by text message (57/74; 77%). 20 participants took part in the healthy eating pilot study. Participants read all/most of the text messages, and most (19/20) thought using mobile technology was a good way to deliver the program. The website was not widely used as visiting the website was reported to be time consuming. Exploratory t-tests revealed an increase in heart healthy eating self-efficacy post program, in particular the environmental self-efficacy subset (Mean = 0.62, SD = 0.74, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Text messaging was seen as a simple and acceptable way to deliver nutrition information and behavior change strategies; however, future research is needed to determine the effectiveness of such programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)

Review

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Open AccessReview mHealth for Smoking Cessation Programs: A Systematic Review
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 412-423; doi:10.3390/jpm4030412
Received: 1 February 2014 / Revised: 19 June 2014 / Accepted: 23 June 2014 / Published: 18 July 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (813 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
mHealth transforms healthcare delivery around the world due to its affordability and right time availability. It has been used for delivery of various smoking cessation programs and interventions over the past decade. With the proliferation of smartphone usage around the world, many smartphone
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mHealth transforms healthcare delivery around the world due to its affordability and right time availability. It has been used for delivery of various smoking cessation programs and interventions over the past decade. With the proliferation of smartphone usage around the world, many smartphone applications are being developed for curbing smoking among smokers. Various interventions like SMS, progress tracking, distractions, peer chats and others are being provided to users through smartphone applications. This paper presents a systematic review that analyses the applications of mobile phones in smoking cessations. The synthesis of the diverse concepts within the literature on smoking cessations using mobile phones provides deeper insights in the emerging mHealth landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)
Open AccessReview A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Mobile Devices and Weight Loss with an Intervention Content Analysis
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(3), 311-385; doi:10.3390/jpm4030311
Received: 17 February 2014 / Revised: 28 May 2014 / Accepted: 28 May 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (1979 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Introduction: Overweight and obesity constitute leading global public health challenges. Tackling overweight and obesity by influencing human behaviour is a complex task, requiring novel emerging health psychology interventions. The aims of this review will be to determine whether mobile devices induce weight loss
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Introduction: Overweight and obesity constitute leading global public health challenges. Tackling overweight and obesity by influencing human behaviour is a complex task, requiring novel emerging health psychology interventions. The aims of this review will be to determine whether mobile devices induce weight loss and improvements in diet and physical activity levels when compared with standard controls without a weight loss intervention or controls allocated to non-mobile device weight loss interventions. Methods: A systematic review on mobile devices and weight loss was conducted. The inclusion criteria were all randomized controlled trials with baseline and post-intervention weight measures in adult subjects >18 years of age without pre-specified co-morbidities. Mobile device specifications included modern, portable devices in the form of smartphones, PDAs, iPods, and Mp3 players. Cohen’s d for standardized differences in mean weight loss was calculated. A random effects meta-analysis was generated using Comprehensive meta-analysis software. Theories and intervention content were coded and analysed. Results: A total of 17 studies were identified, of which 12 were primary trials and 5 were secondary analyses. The meta-analysis generated a medium significant effect size of 0.430 (95% CI 0.252–0.609) (p-value ≤ 0.01), favouring mobile interventions. Throughout the systematic review, mobile devices were found to induce weight loss relative to baseline weight. When comparing them with standard no intervention controls as well as controls receiving non-mobile weight loss interventions, results favoured mobile devices for weight loss. Reductions in Body mass index, waist circumference, and percentage body fat were also found in the review. Improvements in the determinants of weight loss in the form of improved dietary intake and physical activity levels were also found. Theory appears to largely inform intervention design, with the most common theories being Social Cognitive Theory, Elaboration Likelihood Theory, Control Theory, and Goal Theory. The use of behavioural change techniques was widespread across the studies, with a minimum of five per intervention. Conclusion: Mobile devices appear to induce positive changes in the behavioural determinants of weight and subsequently are associated with weight loss. Mobile device interventions are heavily informed by theory and behaviour change techniques. The use of theory appears to effectively enhance levels of constructs targeted by interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)
Open AccessReview Human Centred Design Considerations for Connected Health Devices for the Older Adult
J. Pers. Med. 2014, 4(2), 245-281; doi:10.3390/jpm4020245
Received: 20 February 2014 / Revised: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 6 May 2014 / Published: 4 June 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1960 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the
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Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology. The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design. Here we review examples of some connected health devices chosen by random selection, assess older adult known capabilities and attitudes and finally make analytical recommendations for design approaches and design specifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mobile Health)

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