Special Issue "Smart, Personalized Digital Health and Medicine"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maged N. Kamel Boulos

University of the Highlands and Islands / Oilthigh na Gàidhealtachd agus nan Eilean, The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Elgin, Moray, IV30 1JJ, Scotland, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 01343 576830
Interests: medical and health informatics; including telehealthcare/eHealth; geographic informatics; 3D virtual worlds and virtual globes (mirror worlds); web 2.0; e-learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of JPM is dedicated to the field mHealth (mobile health) and its applications (including 'mobile apps'). Mobile health refers to using small form-factor, Internet-enabled devices, such as feature phones, smartphones, PDAs (personal digital assistants)/palmtops and tablets, in the professional practice of clinical medicine and public health. The applications also extend to supporting clinical students (undergraduates and postgraduates) in their education and CPD (continuing professional development), as well as supporting lay people (patients, carers and the wider general public) in various scenarios related to health, lifestyle management and disease, particularly long-term (chronic) conditions. We welcome manuscripts addressing this important topic of mHealth and any of its various applications and apps, including papers investigating design and user acceptance issues (for various end user groups/age groups, etc.), papers reporting the development of novel mHealth systems and services, evaluation studies, papers on mHealth in low-resource settings, etc.

Prof. Dr. Maged N. Kamel Boulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

• mHealth
• apps
• smartphones
• tablets
• iPad
• Internet
• SMS

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Multi-Stage Human Factors and Comfort Assessment of Instrumented Insoles Designed for Use in a Connected Health Infrastructure
J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(4), 487-508; doi:10.3390/jpm5040487
Received: 7 July 2015 / Revised: 22 October 2015 / Accepted: 23 November 2015 / Published: 16 December 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3473 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Wearable electronics are gaining widespread use as enabling technologies, monitoring human physical activity and behavior as part of connected health infrastructures. Attention to human factors and comfort of these devices can greatly positively influence user experience, with a subsequently higher likelihood of user
[...] Read more.
Wearable electronics are gaining widespread use as enabling technologies, monitoring human physical activity and behavior as part of connected health infrastructures. Attention to human factors and comfort of these devices can greatly positively influence user experience, with a subsequently higher likelihood of user acceptance and lower levels of device rejection. Here, we employ a human factors and comfort assessment methodology grounded in the principles of human-centered design to influence and enhance the design of an instrumented insole. A use case was developed and interrogated by stakeholders, experts, and end users, capturing the context of use and user characteristics for the instrumented insole. This use case informed all stages of the design process through two full design cycles, leading to the development of an initial version 1 and a later version 2 prototype. Each version of the prototype was subjected to an expert human factors inspection and controlled comfort assessment using human volunteers. Structured feedback from the first cycle of testing was the driver of design changes implemented in the version 2 prototype. This prototype was found to have significantly improved human factors and comfort characteristics over the first version of the prototype. Expert inspection found that many of the original problems in the first prototype had been resolved in the second prototype. Furthermore, a comfort assessment of this prototype with a group of young healthy adults showed it to be indistinguishable from their normal footwear. This study demonstrates the power and effectiveness of human factors and comfort assessment methodologies in influencing and improving the design of wearable devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart, Personalized Digital Health and Medicine)
Open AccessArticle Patients’ Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice
J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(4), 452-469; doi:10.3390/jpm5040452
Received: 27 July 2015 / Revised: 23 November 2015 / Accepted: 30 November 2015 / Published: 4 December 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (468 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The
[...] Read more.
Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart, Personalized Digital Health and Medicine)
Open AccessArticle Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives
J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(4), 389-405; doi:10.3390/jpm5040389
Received: 28 August 2015 / Revised: 3 November 2015 / Accepted: 6 November 2015 / Published: 17 November 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (668 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH) compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA) is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP) control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH) program was developed using a patient-centered,
[...] Read more.
African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH) compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA) is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP) control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH) program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18) and Hispanic (20) uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p < 0.0001) indicating significant reductions in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) for the SMASH group vs. the standard care (SC) control group across all time points. 70.6% of SMASH subjects vs. 15.8% of the SC group reached BP control (< 140/90 mmH) at month 1 (p < 0.001). At month 6, 94.4% of the SMASH vs. 41.2% of the SC group exhibited controlled BP (p < 0.003). Our findings provide encouraging evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart, Personalized Digital Health and Medicine)
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