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Special Issue "Space-Based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management"

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A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Shirish Ravan

United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs, Beijing, China
E-Mail
Interests: remote sensing and GIS applications in the area of natural resources management; biodiversity; forestry; agriculture; disaster management; infrastructure development planning; development of GIS based information systems; project/programme Management; capacity building and training
Guest Editor
Dr. Sisi Zlatanova

3D Geoinformation, Faculty of Architecture and The Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: 3D GIS; 3D indoor modelling and navigation; CityGML; 3D analysis; emergency response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), through its UN-SPIDER Programme (United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response) organized “United Nations International Conference on Space-based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management - Best Practices for Risk Reduction and Rapid Response Mapping” from 22 to 25 November 2011, Beijing, China, see http://www.un-spider.org/conference-beijing-2011. The purpose was to promote the access and use of space-based technologies and solutions for disaster management and emergency response within relevant communities. The conference focused on three major topics namely (a) Global datasets and information for risk reduction (b) Rapid response mapping: opportunities and challenges and (c) Networks: building upon and strengthening existing capacities. The conference covered range topics from covering the advancement in technology, best practices disaster risk management, experiences in the rapid response mapping etc. Authors are encouraged to extend their presentations to a full research paper or long literature review to submit to the special issue. Moreover, this special issue is also open to global colleagues in this field.

Dr. Shirish Ravan
Dr. Sisi Zlatanova
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • disaster/risk management
  • emergency response
  • post-disaster reconstruction
  • 3D spatial data integration
  • 3D modelling
  • GIS and geoinformation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Potential Impact of Climate Changes on the Inundation Risk Levels in a Dam Break Scenario
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(1), 110-134; doi:10.3390/ijgi2010110
Received: 10 December 2012 / Revised: 6 February 2013 / Accepted: 15 February 2013 / Published: 4 March 2013
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Abstract
The overall objective of the study is to generate information for an enhanced land use planning with respect to flood hazards. The study assesses the potential impact of climate change by simulating a dam break scenario in a high intensity rainfall event and
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The overall objective of the study is to generate information for an enhanced land use planning with respect to flood hazards. The study assesses the potential impact of climate change by simulating a dam break scenario in a high intensity rainfall event and evaluates the vulnerability risk in the downstream region by integrating ArcGIS and Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) technologies. In the past century, the evidence of climate changes are observed in terms of increase in high intensity rainfall events. These events are of high concern, as increased inflow rates may increase the probability of a dam failure, leading to higher magnitude flooding events involving multiple consequences. The 100 year historical rainfall data for the central Mississippi region reveals an increased trend in the intensity of rainfall rates after the 1970s. With more than 10% of high hazard dams in the central region, the damage can be far accumulative. The study determines occurrence of the high intensity rainfall event in the past 100 years for central Mississippi and simulates a Ross Barnett Reservoir dam break scenario and evaluates the vulnerability risks due to inundation in the immediate downstream region, which happens to be the State Capital. The results indicate that the inundation due to a Ross Barnett Reservoir failure under high intensity rainfall event is comparable to a catastrophic flood event experienced by the region in 1979, which almost equals a 200-year flood magnitude. The results indicate that the extent and depth of flood waters poses a significant destructive threat to the state capital, inundating various infrastructural and transportation networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space-Based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management)
Open AccessArticle Exposure Estimation from Multi-Resolution Optical Satellite Imagery for Seismic Risk Assessment
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(1), 69-88; doi:10.3390/ijgi1010069
Received: 10 April 2012 / Revised: 11 May 2012 / Accepted: 17 May 2012 / Published: 29 May 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1779 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Given high urbanization rates and increasing spatio-temporal variability in many present-day cities, exposure information is often out-of-date, highly aggregated or spatially fragmented, increasing the uncertainties associated with seismic risk assessments. This work therefore aims at using space-based technologies to estimate, complement and extend exposure
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Given high urbanization rates and increasing spatio-temporal variability in many present-day cities, exposure information is often out-of-date, highly aggregated or spatially fragmented, increasing the uncertainties associated with seismic risk assessments. This work therefore aims at using space-based technologies to estimate, complement and extend exposure data at multiple scales, over large areas and at a comparatively low cost for the case of the city of Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. At a neighborhood scale, an analysis of urban structures using medium-resolution optical satellite images is performed. Applying image classification and change-detection analysis to a time-series of Landsat images, the urban environment can be delineated into areas of relatively homogeneous urban structure types, which can provide a first estimate of an exposed building stock (e.g., approximate age of structures, composition and distribution of predominant building types). At a building-by-building scale, a more detailed analysis of the exposed building stock is carried out using a high-resolution Quickbird image. Furthermore, the multi-resolution datasets are combined with census data to disaggregate population statistics. The tools used within this study are being developed on a free- and open-source basis and aim at being transparent, usable and transferable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space-Based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management)

Review

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Open AccessReview An Analysis of Geospatial Technologies for Risk and Natural Disaster Management
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2012, 1(2), 166-185; doi:10.3390/ijgi1020166
Received: 15 June 2012 / Revised: 18 July 2012 / Accepted: 26 July 2012 / Published: 7 August 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (393 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses the use of spatial data for risk and natural disaster management. The importance of remote-sensing (RS), Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is stressed by comparing studies of the use of these technologies for natural
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This paper discusses the use of spatial data for risk and natural disaster management. The importance of remote-sensing (RS), Geographic Information System (GIS) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is stressed by comparing studies of the use of these technologies for natural disaster management. Spatial data sharing is discussed in the context of the establishment of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) for natural disasters. Some examples of SDI application in disaster management are analyzed, and the need for participation from organizations and governments to facilitate the exchange of information and to improve preventive and emergency plans is reinforced. Additionally, the potential involvement of citizens in the risk and disaster management process by providing voluntary data collected from volunteered geographic information (VGI) applications is explored. A model relating all of the spatial data-sharing aspects discussed in the article was suggested to elucidate the importance of the issues raised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space-Based Technologies for Disaster Risk Management)

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