Special Issue "Collaborative Mapping"

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A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Linda See (Website)

Ecosystem Services and Management Program, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Interests: land cover validation; creation of hybrid land cover products; crowdsourcing and volunteered geographic information (data collection, quality assessment, creating added value products with VGI); serious gaming; GeoComputation
Guest Editor
Dr. Steffen Fritz (Website)

Group Leader—Earth Observation Systems ESM - Ecosystem Services and Management IIASA - International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: +43-2236-807-353
Fax: +43-2236-807-599
Guest Editor
Dr. Jan De Leeuw (Website)

ICRAF World Agroforestry Centre, United Nations Avenue, Gigiri, PO Box 30677, Nairobi, 00100, Kenya
Interests: mapping of environment and agriculture; drought early warning systems; remote sensing for index-based insurance; participatory mapping; remote sensing and impact assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More accurate, detailed and up-to-date maps are needed for a large number of scientific applications including monitoring and assessment of biodiversity, climate change, risk and vulnerability, energy supply and demand, and food security, especially in the current environment of rapid change. Remote sensing (RS) can provide comprehensive spatial and temporal coverage of the earth’s surface but there is a lack of reference data, which is needed to calibrate and validate these maps. Moreover, there are situations where RS data are too expensive and the temporal coverage is insufficient (e.g. for applications of emergency response). The increasing number of citizen sensors (i.e. volunteers contributing information from the internet, mobile devices and newly developed sensors) has already begun to radically change mapping through citizen collaboration, e.g. OpenStreetMap and Google MapMaker. The aim of this special issue is to publish the latest research on collaborative mapping including but not limited to the following:

  • Thematic and geometric accuracy of collaborative mapping (i.e. quality of the information)
  • Development of indicators of robustness of / confidence in the VGI
  • Authoritativeness of collaborative map products, i.e. ideas on how to bring collaborative map products to a level of authority that is not disputed
  • Data harmonization
  • Collaborative mapping and the role of mapping institutions
  • Spatial cognition in collaborative mapping
  • Cost effectiveness and cost benefits of collaborative mapping
  • The use of collaborative mapping in the areas of biodiversity, land use science, climate change, emergency response, and other relevant applied fields

Dr. Linda See
Dr. Steffen Fritz
Dr. Jan de Leeuw
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 900 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • big data
  • citizen science
  • collaborative mapping
  • crowdsourcing
  • data harmonization
  • digital Earth
  • neogeography
  • gaming
  • GeoComputation
  • Geovisualization
  • Geoweb
  • participatory GIS
  • social networking
  • Volunteered Geographic Information
  • Web mapping
  • Web 2.0/3.0

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial The Rise of Collaborative Mapping: Trends and Future Directions
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(4), 955-958; doi:10.3390/ijgi2040955
Received: 9 October 2013 / Accepted: 10 October 2013 / Published: 11 October 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (87 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The nature of map production and the dissemination of spatially referenced information have changed radically over the last decade. This change has been marked by an explosion of user generated spatial content via Web 2.0, access to a rising tide of big [...] Read more.
The nature of map production and the dissemination of spatially referenced information have changed radically over the last decade. This change has been marked by an explosion of user generated spatial content via Web 2.0, access to a rising tide of big data streams from remotely-sensed and public data archives, and the use of mobile phones and other sensors as mapping devices. All of these developments have facilitated a much wider use of geodata, transforming ordinary citizens into neogeographers. This increase in user-generated content has resulted in a blurring of the boundaries between the traditional map producer, i.e., national mapping agencies and local authorities, and citizens as consumers of this information. Citizens now take an active role in mapping different types of features on the Earth’s surface as volunteers, either by providing observations on the ground or tracing data from other sources, such as aerial photographs or satellite imagery. OpenStreetMap (OSM) and Ushahidi are two well-known examples of a growing collection of collaborative mapping communities that are building rich spatial datasets, which are openly accessible. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Alpine Glaciology: An Historical Collaboration between Volunteers and Scientists and the Challenge Presented by an Integrated Approach
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(3), 680-703; doi:10.3390/ijgi2030680
Received: 4 June 2013 / Revised: 15 July 2013 / Accepted: 23 July 2013 / Published: 5 August 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (556 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
European Alpine glaciology has a long tradition of studies and activities, in which researchers have often relied on the field work of some specialized volunteer operators. Despite the remarkable results of this cooperation, some problems in field data harmonization and in covering [...] Read more.
European Alpine glaciology has a long tradition of studies and activities, in which researchers have often relied on the field work of some specialized volunteer operators. Despite the remarkable results of this cooperation, some problems in field data harmonization and in covering the whole range of monitored glaciers are still present. Moreover, dynamics of reduction, fragmentation and decline, which in recent decades characterize Alpine glaciers, make more urgent the need to improve spatial and temporal monitoring, still maintaining adequate quality standards. Scientific field monitoring activities on Alpine glaciers run parallel to a number of initiatives by individuals and amateur associations, keepers of alternative, experiential and para-scientific knowledge of the glacial environment. Problems of harmonization, coordination, recruitment and updating can be addressed with the help of a collaborative approach—citizen science-like—in which the scientific coordination guarantees information quality and web 2.0 tools operate as mediators between expert glaciologists and non-expert contributors. This paper gives an overview of glaciological information currently produced in the European Alpine region, representing it in an organized structure, functional to the discussion. An empowering solution is then proposed, both methodological and technological, for the integration of multisource data. Its characteristics, potentials and problems are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)
Open AccessArticle Towards an Authoritative OpenStreetMap: Conflating OSM and OS OpenData National Maps’ Road Network
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(3), 704-728; doi:10.3390/ijgi2030704
Received: 5 June 2013 / Revised: 25 July 2013 / Accepted: 30 July 2013 / Published: 5 August 2013
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (2068 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The quality aspects of OpenStreetMap (OSM), as the global representation of crowd-sourced mapping, have always been of priomary concern to academics. While the methodologies for checking its quality against the national maps have been implemented by a number of studies, there are [...] Read more.
The quality aspects of OpenStreetMap (OSM), as the global representation of crowd-sourced mapping, have always been of priomary concern to academics. While the methodologies for checking its quality against the national maps have been implemented by a number of studies, there are minimal works on how to practically improve the quality of OSM towards being an authoritative map source. This paper presents a method for conflating road attributes, namely the name and reference code, of OSM with the Open Data provided by Ordnance Survey (the British national mapping agency). The added values in the proposed methodology include the daily updates and serving of the conflated maps via open Web Services. More importantly, the OSM crowd correction is facilitated by frequently highlighting and web-serving the individual differences. There are currently over 5,800 differences in matching road names and references between the two datasets. In addition to describing the conflation methodology, the different geographic distribution patterns of the identified differences are discussed. A negative effect of the road density on the ratio of the mismatched features between the two datasets is observable, evidenced by their different geographical distribution over the map. It is shown that the best correspondence between attributes exists in the very dense areas, followed by the very low density areas, and lastly in the middle to large sized cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)
Open AccessArticle Assessing Completeness and Spatial Error of Features in Volunteered Geographic Information
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(2), 507-530; doi:10.3390/ijgi2020507
Received: 28 March 2013 / Revised: 14 May 2013 / Accepted: 20 May 2013 / Published: 4 June 2013
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (1387 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The assessment of the quality and accuracy of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) contributions, and by extension the ultimate utility of VGI data has fostered much debate within the geographic community. The limited research to date has been focused on VGI data of [...] Read more.
The assessment of the quality and accuracy of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) contributions, and by extension the ultimate utility of VGI data has fostered much debate within the geographic community. The limited research to date has been focused on VGI data of linear features and has shown that the error in the data is heterogeneously distributed. Some have argued that data produced by numerous contributors will produce a more accurate product than an individual and some research on crowd-sourced initiatives has shown that to be true, although research on VGI is more infrequent. This paper proposes a method for quantifying the completeness and accuracy of a select subset of infrastructure-associated point datasets of volunteered geographic data within a major metropolitan area using a national geospatial dataset as the reference benchmark with two datasets from volunteers used as test datasets. The results of this study illustrate the benefits of including quality control in the collection process for volunteered data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)
Open AccessArticle A Spatially Intelligent Public Participation System for the Environmental Impact Assessment Process
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(2), 480-506; doi:10.3390/ijgi2020480
Received: 25 March 2013 / Revised: 5 May 2013 / Accepted: 7 May 2013 / Published: 27 May 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a decision-making process that evaluates the possible significant effects that a proposed project may exert on the environment. The EIA scoping and reviewing stages often involve public participation. Although its importance has long been recognized, public [...] Read more.
An environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a decision-making process that evaluates the possible significant effects that a proposed project may exert on the environment. The EIA scoping and reviewing stages often involve public participation. Although its importance has long been recognized, public participation in the EIA process is often regarded as ineffective, due to time, budget, resource, technical and procedural constraints, as well as the complexity of environmental information. Geographic Information System (GIS) and Volunteer Geographic Information (VGI) have the potential to contribute to data collection, sharing and presentation, utilize local user-generated content to benefit decision-making and increase public outreach. This research integrated GIS, VGI, social media tools, data mining and mobile technology to design a spatially intelligent framework that presented and shared EIA information effectively to the public. A spatially intelligent public participative system (SIPPS) was also developed as a proof-of-concept of the framework. The research selected the Tehachapi Renewable Transmission Project (TRTP) as the pilot study area. Survey questionnaires were designed to collect feedback and conduct evaluation. Results show that SIPPS was able to improve the effectiveness of public participation, promote environmental awareness and achieve good system usability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)
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Open AccessArticle A Collaborative Geospatial Shoreline Inventory Tool to Guide Coastal Development and Habitat Conservation
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(2), 385-404; doi:10.3390/ijgi2020385
Received: 11 March 2013 / Revised: 2 May 2013 / Accepted: 2 May 2013 / Published: 13 May 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1074 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We are developing a geospatial inventory tool that will guide habitat conservation, restoration and coastal development and benefit several stakeholders who seek mitigation and adaptation strategies to shoreline changes resulting from erosion and sea level rise. The ESRI Geoportal Server, which is [...] Read more.
We are developing a geospatial inventory tool that will guide habitat conservation, restoration and coastal development and benefit several stakeholders who seek mitigation and adaptation strategies to shoreline changes resulting from erosion and sea level rise. The ESRI Geoportal Server, which is a type of web portal used to find and access geospatial information in a central repository, is customized by adding a Geoinventory tool capability that allows any shoreline related data to be searched, displayed and analyzed on a map viewer. Users will be able to select sections of the shoreline and generate statistical reports in the map viewer to allow for comparisons. The tool will also facilitate map-based discussion forums and creation of user groups to encourage citizen participation in decisions regarding shoreline stabilization and restoration, thereby promoting sustainable coastal development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)
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Open AccessArticle Using Geometric Properties to Evaluate Possible Integration of Authoritative and Volunteered Geographic Information
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(2), 349-370; doi:10.3390/ijgi2020349
Received: 4 March 2013 / Revised: 15 April 2013 / Accepted: 18 April 2013 / Published: 25 April 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1247 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The assessment of data quality from different sources can be considered as a key challenge in supporting effective geospatial data integration and promoting collaboration in mapping projects. This paper presents a methodology for assessing positional and shape quality for authoritative large-scale data, [...] Read more.
The assessment of data quality from different sources can be considered as a key challenge in supporting effective geospatial data integration and promoting collaboration in mapping projects. This paper presents a methodology for assessing positional and shape quality for authoritative large-scale data, such as Ordnance Survey (OS) UK data and General Directorate for Survey (GDS) Iraq data, and Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI), such as OpenStreetMap (OSM) data, with the intention of assessing possible integration. It is based on the measurement of discrepancies among the datasets, addressing positional accuracy and shape fidelity, using standard procedures and also directional statistics. Line feature comparison has been undertaken using buffering techniques and statistics, whilst shape metrics, including moments invariant, have been applied to assess polygon matching. The analyses are presented with a user-friendly interface which eases data input, computation and output of results, and assists in interpretation of the comparison. The results show that a comparison of positional and shape characteristics of OS data or GDS data, with those of OSM data, indicates that their integration for large scale mapping applications is not viable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Collaborative Mapping)

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