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Special Issue "Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mary J. Thornbush

Department of Geography, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: physical geography; geomorphology; environment; climate; landscape change; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a tribute to the participation of women in the geosciences, including physical geography, as well as within geology and the Earth sciences. It commemorates the newly formed Commission on Gender and Geoethics (CoGG), as part of the International Association of Geoethics (IAGETH). The guest editor is the representative of the UK national chapter and coordinator of CoGG. The Special Issue presents scenarios where female professionals, such as academics, are considered as part of the geosciences, either as participants or subjects. The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is a suitable outlet for this content because of its international outreach and environmental scope. It is anticipated that the content will have ramifications for current international policy concerning the ethical treatment of women in the geosciences. Contributions approach the role of women in the geosciences from a feminist perspective that is humanistic and inclusive. As part of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals for 2015, the third goal (to ‘promote gender equality and empower women’) is an important one to achieve in the developing, as well as developed world, and this is true for the academic disciplines, particularly those that are traditionally male-dominated, such as the geosciences. Developed countries should set an example for the world of the equal treatment of women, and this includes within the academic sphere.

Dr. Mary J. Thornbush
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(4), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13040398
Received: 30 March 2016 / Accepted: 30 March 2016 / Published: 1 April 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (267 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences is a focus on the participation of women in traditionally male-dominated professions, with geography as an exemplary academic subject. The Special Issue stems from the Commission of Gender and
[...] Read more.
In this introduction to the Special Issue on Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences is a focus on the participation of women in traditionally male-dominated professions, with geography as an exemplary academic subject. The Special Issue stems from the Commission of Gender and Geoethics as part of the International Association of Geoethics, and endeavors to bring together efforts at various spatial scales that examine the position of women in science and engineering in particular, as conveyed in engineering geology, disaster management sciences, and climate change adaptation studies. It has been discovered, for instance, that men are more active and personally prepared at the community level (in Atlantic Canada coastal communities), and more action is still required in developing countries especially to promote gender equality and empower women. Studies contained in this Special Issue also reveal that tutoring and mentoring by other women can promote further involvement in non-traditional professions, such as professional engineering geology, where women are preferring more traditional (less applied) approaches that may circumscribe their ability to find suitable employment after graduation. Moreover, the hiring policy needs to change in many countries, such as Canada, where there are fewer women at entry-level and senior ranks within geography, especially in physical geography as the scientific part of the discipline. The exclusion of women in traditionally male-dominated spheres needs to be addressed and rectified for the ascent of women to occur in scientific geography and in other geosciences as well as science and engineering at large. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Gender-Based Experiences and Perceptions after the 2010 Winter Storms in Atlantic Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(10), 12518-12529; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph121012518
Received: 16 June 2015 / Revised: 21 September 2015 / Accepted: 29 September 2015 / Published: 8 October 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (716 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper conveys the findings of the first phase of a longitudinal study into climate change adaptation in Atlantic Canada. Men and women from 10 coastal communities in three provinces (Quebec, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island) were interviewed to better understand how
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This paper conveys the findings of the first phase of a longitudinal study into climate change adaptation in Atlantic Canada. Men and women from 10 coastal communities in three provinces (Quebec, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island) were interviewed to better understand how both sexes perceived and reacted to extreme weather events. Their responses were recorded based on their experiences, personal and community levels of preparedness, as well as help received and effects on their lives. Most importantly, the findings denote that more men were personally prepared and more active in the community than women. More men recognized a deficiency in help at the community level, and were critical of government in particular, addressing a lack of financial interventions and support. Women were forthcoming with their emotions, admitting to feeling fear and worry, and their perceptions in terms of impacts and actions were closer to home. The results support what others have shown that in rural and coastal communities the traditional division of labor may influence and lead to a gender bias in terms of actions and gradual adaptation in communities. There is a need to better understand how these sometimes subtle differences may affect decisions that do not always consider women’s roles and experiences in the face of extreme events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences)
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Open AccessArticle Are Women in Turkey Both Risks and Resources in Disaster Management?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(6), 5758-5774; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph120605758
Received: 18 August 2014 / Accepted: 13 May 2015 / Published: 26 May 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (8083 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant. Although gender inequality is considered a sociological problem, the large number of female victims in disasters warrants an assessment of disaster management sciences. In this article, related concepts are discussed
[...] Read more.
From a global perspective, the universality of gender-related societal issues is particularly significant. Although gender inequality is considered a sociological problem, the large number of female victims in disasters warrants an assessment of disaster management sciences. In this article, related concepts are discussed based on their relevance sociologically and in disaster management to develop a common terminology and examine this complex topic, which is rooted in different social profiles and anthropological heterogeneity throughout the world. A brief history is discussed, and significant examples are provided from different disasters in Turkey to illustrate why a woman-oriented approach should be adopted when evaluating concepts of gender inequality. Observations of disasters have shown that it is important to apply international standards (humanitarian charter and minimum disaster response standards), especially during periods of response and rehabilitation. Relevant factors related to gender should be included in these standards, such as women’s health and hygiene, which will be discussed in more detail. A woman-based approach is designed in relation to two aspects: risks and resources. Thus, gender-sensitive methods of mitigating and preventing disasters are provided. The main purpose of the article is to contribute to the development of a universal culture that prioritizes gender in disaster management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences)
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Open AccessArticle Improving Female Participation in Professional Engineering Geology to Bring New Perspectives to Ethics in the Geosciences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 9429-9445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110909429
Received: 15 May 2014 / Revised: 29 August 2014 / Accepted: 29 August 2014 / Published: 11 September 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (550 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many papers have been published related to the retention and advancement of women in sciences. Engineering geology is one of the professional areas where women have not yet broken the gender barrier. The research issues of this paper are focused on why female
[...] Read more.
Many papers have been published related to the retention and advancement of women in sciences. Engineering geology is one of the professional areas where women have not yet broken the gender barrier. The research issues of this paper are focused on why female students “leak out” at the end of engineering geology studies, and what can be done to encourage them to complete their degrees with an engineering career in mind. The author has studied students’ preferences of the final year project required to complete their degree at the University of Salamanca (Salamanca, Spain). It has been found that most female students are choosing a more theoretical final project instead of a practical one relevant to professional employment, contrary to their male peers. Focus group meetings with the students showed that at the end of five years of engineering geology training, many female students, unsatisfied with the content of their courses, feel that their expectations had not been met. They often have preferences for traditional geology rather than applied branches of the subject. Also, they do not feel comfortable with future job prospects in the profession. From the findings of this research it is clear that tutoring and mentoring would be valuable from the beginning of studies to allow all students to become aware of the content and the potential outcomes of engineering geology studies. In the case of female students, it is particularly important for them to know from the very start that they are about to join what is still a man’s world but that they are capable of achieving just as much as men can in the profession. Most importantly, the involvement of more female engineers in professional engineering, including teaching duties, should serve as example and role models in students’ education and future careers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Mineral Resource Dilemma: How to Balance the Interests of Government, Local Communities and Abiotic Nature
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(9), 8632-8644; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph110908632
Received: 5 May 2014 / Revised: 15 August 2014 / Accepted: 15 August 2014 / Published: 25 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is noted that over the last few years the implementation of several mineral exploration, development and mining projects has been suspended and even completely stopped due to resistance from local communities. The key concerns of local residents typically include perceived or real
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It is noted that over the last few years the implementation of several mineral exploration, development and mining projects has been suspended and even completely stopped due to resistance from local communities. The key concerns of local residents typically include perceived or real impact of mining enterprises on the environment, unfair distribution of profits from mining and exploration activities, insufficient contributions to local government budgets and lack of transparency regarding ultimate ownership of companies conducting exploration and mining. The article looks at social conflicts of this kind and suggests some alternative solutions that could prevent such conflicts at the stage of granting exploration and mining rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Geoethics in the Geosciences)
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