E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria"

Quicklinks

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christos Hadjichristodoulou

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology School of Medicine University of Thessaly, 22 Papakyriazi street, 41222 Larissa, Greece
Fax: +30 2410 565051
Interests: epidemiology, surveillance of infectious diseases; vector-borne diseases; zoonoses; environmental health and hygiene

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Malaria is a vector-borne parasitic disease that, according to the World Health Organization estimates, caused over 200 million cases and over 600 thousands deaths in 2010. Although malaria is known to rank fifth as a cause of death in low income countries, during the last decade and due to socioeconomic destabilization and massive migration, malaria has become a real threat for developed countries as well. This has resulted in the re-emergence of the disease in countries that have been malaria-free for a long period of time. This special issue invites researchers worldwide to submit their work in order to broaden our knowledge on malaria reoccurrence, prevention and control. Therefore, it may include topics such as the emergence of the disease in malaria-free countries, reports of malaria outbreaks in countries that are in the elimination phase, the development and the outcomes of integrated surveillance programs, the new technologies in prevention and control of the disease (integrated mosquito management programs, vaccine trials, etc.) and the evolution and geographical distribution of insecticide resistant vectors and antimalarial resistant parasites.

Prof. Dr. Christos Hadjichristodoulo
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle The Historical Distribution of Main Malaria Foci in Spain as Related to Water Bodies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(8), 7896-7917; doi:10.3390/ijerph110807896
Received: 16 April 2014 / Revised: 4 July 2014 / Accepted: 25 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
PDF Full-text (1754 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of [...] Read more.
The possible connectivity between the spatial distribution of water bodies suitable for vectors of malaria and endemic malaria foci in Southern Europe is still not well known. Spain was one of the last countries in Western Europe to be declared free of malaria by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1964. This study combines, by means of a spatial-temporal analysis, the historical data of patients and deceased with the distribution of water bodies where the disease-transmitting mosquitos proliferate. Therefore, data from historical archives with a Geographic Information System (GIS), using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method, was analyzed with the aim of identifying regional differences in the distribution of malaria in Spain. The reasons, why the risk of transmission is concentrated in specific regions, are related to worse socioeconomic conditions (Extremadura), the presence of another vector (Anopheles labranchiae) besides A. atroparvus (Levante) or large areas of water bodies in conditions to reproduce theses vectors (La Mancha and Western Andalusia). In the particular case of Western Andalusia, in 1913, the relatively high percentage of 4.73% of the surface, equal to 202362 ha, corresponds to wetlands and other unhealthy water bodies. These wetlands have been reduced as a result of desiccation policies and climate change such as the Little Ice Age and Global Climate Change. The comprehension of the main factors of these wetland changes in the past can help us interpret accurately the future risk of malaria re-emergence in temperate latitudes, since it reveals the crucial role of unhealthy water bodies on the distribution, endemicity and eradication of malaria in southern Europe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria)
Open AccessArticle The Epidemiology of Imported Malaria in Taiwan between 2002–2013: The Importance of Sensitive Surveillance and Implications for Pre-Travel Medical Advice
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(6), 5651-5664; doi:10.3390/ijerph110605651
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 8 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (566 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the epidemiology of imported malaria in Taiwan between 2002 and 2013. We analyzed the national data recorded by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (Taiwan CDC). Malaria cases were diagnosed by blood films, polymerase [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to assess the epidemiology of imported malaria in Taiwan between 2002 and 2013. We analyzed the national data recorded by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (Taiwan CDC). Malaria cases were diagnosed by blood films, polymerase chain reaction, or rapid diagnostic tests. The risk of re-establishment of malarial transmission in Taiwan was assessed. A total of 229 malaria cases were included in our analysis. All of the cases were imported. One hundred and ninety-two cases (84%) were diagnosed within 13 days of the start of symptoms/signs; 43% of these cases were acquired in Africa and 44% were acquired in Asia. Plasmodium falciparum was responsible for the majority (56%) of these cases. Travel to an endemic area was associated with the acquisition of malaria. The malaria importation rate was 2.36 per 1,000,000 travelers (range 1.20–5.74). The reproductive number under control (Rc) was 0. No endemic transmission of malaria in Taiwan was identified. This study suggests that a vigilant surveillance system, vector-control efforts, case management, and an educational approach focused on travelers and immigrants who visit malaria endemic countries are needed to prevent outbreaks and sustain the elimination of malaria in Taiwan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria)
Open AccessArticle A Randomized Longitudinal Factorial Design to Assess Malaria Vector Control and Disease Management Interventions in Rural Tanzania
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 5317-5332; doi:10.3390/ijerph110505317
Received: 14 March 2014 / Revised: 9 May 2014 / Accepted: 9 May 2014 / Published: 16 May 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (540 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Correction
Abstract
The optimization of malaria control strategies is complicated by constraints posed by local health systems, infrastructure, limited resources, and the complex interactions between infection, disease, and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol of a randomized factorial study [...] Read more.
The optimization of malaria control strategies is complicated by constraints posed by local health systems, infrastructure, limited resources, and the complex interactions between infection, disease, and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol of a randomized factorial study designed to address this research gap. This project will evaluate two malaria control interventions in Mvomero District, Tanzania: (1) a disease management strategy involving early detection and treatment by community health workers using rapid diagnostic technology; and (2) vector control through community-supported larviciding. Six study villages were assigned to each of four groups (control, early detection and treatment, larviciding, and early detection and treatment plus larviciding). The primary endpoint of interest was change in malaria infection prevalence across the intervention groups measured during annual longitudinal cross-sectional surveys. Recurring entomological surveying, household surveying, and focus group discussions will provide additional valuable insights. At baseline, 962 households across all 24 villages participated in a household survey; 2,884 members from 720 of these households participated in subsequent malariometric surveying. The study design will allow us to estimate the effect sizes of different intervention mixtures. Careful documentation of our study protocol may also serve other researchers designing field-based intervention trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria)
Open AccessArticle Community Knowledge and Acceptance of Larviciding for Malaria Control in a Rural District of East-Central Tanzania
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(5), 5137-5154; doi:10.3390/ijerph110505137
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 7 May 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (285 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of microbial larvicides, a form of larval source management, is a less commonly used malaria control intervention that nonetheless has significant potential as a component of an integrated vector management strategy. We evaluated community acceptability of larviciding in a rural [...] Read more.
The use of microbial larvicides, a form of larval source management, is a less commonly used malaria control intervention that nonetheless has significant potential as a component of an integrated vector management strategy. We evaluated community acceptability of larviciding in a rural district in east-central Tanzania using data from 962 household surveys, 12 focus group discussions, and 24 in-depth interviews. Most survey respondents trusted in the safety (73.1%) and efficacy of larviciding, both with regards to mosquito control (92.3%) and to reduce malaria infection risk (91.9%). Probing these perceptions using a Likert scale provides a more detailed picture. Focus group participants and key informants were also receptive to larviciding, but stressed the importance of sensitization before its implementation. Overall, 73.4% of survey respondents expressed a willingness to make a nominal household contribution to a larviciding program, a proportion which decreased as the proposed contribution increased. The lower-bound mean willingness to pay is estimated at 2,934 Tanzanian Shillings (approximately US$1.76) per three month period. We present a multivariate probit regression analysis examining factors associated with willingness to pay. Overall, our findings point to a receptive environment in a rural setting in Tanzania for the use of microbial larvicides in malaria control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Malaria Vaccine Development and How External Forces Shape It: An Overview
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11(7), 6791-6807; doi:10.3390/ijerph110706791
Received: 6 March 2014 / Revised: 3 June 2014 / Accepted: 4 June 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to analyse the current status and scientific value of malaria vaccine approaches and to provide a realistic prognosis for future developments. We systematically review previous approaches to malaria vaccination, address how vaccine efforts have developed, how [...] Read more.
The aim of this paper is to analyse the current status and scientific value of malaria vaccine approaches and to provide a realistic prognosis for future developments. We systematically review previous approaches to malaria vaccination, address how vaccine efforts have developed, how this issue may be fixed, and how external forces shape vaccine development. Our analysis provides significant information on the various aspects and on the external factors that shape malaria vaccine development and reveal the importance of vaccine development in our society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiology, Prevention and Control of Malaria)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
IJERPH Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
ijerph@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to IJERPH
Back to Top