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Special Issue "Built Environments, Food Environments, and Public Health"

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rebecca A. Seguin

Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, 412 Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 6072558250
Interests: theory-informed, community-based nutrition and physical activity interventions and dissemination research for chronic disease prevention (e.g., cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes), focusing on women, older adults, low-income families, and rural and other underserved populations; health disparities and health equity; food and physical activity environment factors related to behavior change and maintenance; and community capacity building for health promotion
Guest Editor
Mr. Brian K. Lo

Affiliation: Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, 417 Savage Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA
E-Mail
Interests: determinants of healthy eating and physical activity; diet and physical activity measurements; the behavioral epidemiology of weight control; planning and evaluation of health promotion and public health interventions; and community-engaged research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Built Environments, Food Environments, and Public Health” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Over the past decade, there has been growing interest in understanding the role of built environments, food environments, and their related health behaviors and outcomes such as physical activity and diet quality. Improved understanding of these contextual factors is key to identifying innovative policies and programs to promote active living and healthy eating. However, more research is needed to advance the field. First, although both physical activity and food environments have become the target of many interventions and much research, there is a lack of sensitive and specific tools to assess environmental changes, limiting the ability to demonstrate the mediating role of an enhanced environment contributing to the changes in the health outcomes of interest. Second, much of the evidence supporting policy and environmental strategies to encourage healthy living comes from research in urban settings. There is an urgent need to better understand this topic among other underserved populations such as rural and military populations and others. Third, more longitudinal designs and analyses are need to discern causality in the relationship between built environments and health behaviors and outcomes.

In this Special Issue of the journal, we aim to feature articles that highlight: 1) innovative approaches in measuring the built environments, particularly tools shown to be sensitive to change/intervention; 2) findings from underserved populations, broadly defined; and 3) outcomes of cohort and intervention studies that are related to built environments, food environments, and health behaviors and outcomes. Collectively, these articles will advance knowledge that aim to advance measurement tools and methodologies, inform policy, and build a strong evidence base on the effectiveness of built environment interventions.

Dr. Rebecca A. Seguin
Mr. Brian K. Lo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sedentary behavior
  • physical activity
  • diet
  • interventions
  • health promotion
  • measurement
  • public health
  • built environment
  • food environment
  • underserved populations

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Physical Activity and Fundamental Motor Skill Performance of 5–10 Year Old Children in Three Different Playgrounds
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 1896; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15091896
Received: 22 June 2018 / Revised: 22 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 31 August 2018
PDF Full-text (321 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Playgrounds provide opportunities for children to engage in physical activity and develop their fundamental motor skills. The aim of this descriptive pilot study was to examine whether playground design facilitated different levels of physical activity and fundamental motor skills. Children aged 5 to
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Playgrounds provide opportunities for children to engage in physical activity and develop their fundamental motor skills. The aim of this descriptive pilot study was to examine whether playground design facilitated different levels of physical activity and fundamental motor skills. Children aged 5 to 10 (n = 57) were recruited from three independent playgrounds located in Melbourne (Australia). Whilst playing, children wore accelerometers which measured time spent in physical activity and direct observations recorded fundamental motor skills and play equipment use. A general linear model with playground type as the predictor and adjusting for monitor wear-time identified whether mean time in physical activity was different for the three playgrounds. Frequencies and a one-way ANOVA assessed whether the observed mean number of fundamental motor skills varied between playgrounds. On average, 38.1% of time (12.0 min) was spent in moderate- vigorous-intensity physical activity. Children in the traditional playground (n = 16) engaged in more moderate-intensity physical activity (9.4 min) than children in the adventure playground (n = 21), (5.6 min) (p = 0.027). There were no significant associations with vigorous-intensity physical activity or fundamental motor skills between playgrounds. Children performed few fundamental motor skills but used a wider variety of equipment in the contemporary and adventure playgrounds. Playgrounds need to maximise opportunities for children to engage in physical activity and develop fundamental motor skills. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Built Environments, Food Environments, and Public Health)
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