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Special Issue "Using Total Worker Health to Advance Worker Health and Safety"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 8 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Diane Rohlman

Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, 145 N. Riverside Drive, 100 CPHB, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neurotoxic effects and neurological disorders in humans exposed to chemical and other agents; impaired populations exposed to workplace hazards; adverse effects of pesticide exposure on neurobehavioral performance
Guest Editor
Dr. Kevin M. Kelly

Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, University Research Park, 106 IREH, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biological and biomedical anthropology; population health; occupational health; mixed methods; data analysis; contemporary US

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is now recognized that aspects of the workplace (scheduling, shift work, physically-demanding work, chemical exposures), not only increase the risk of injury and illness, but also impact health behaviours (smoking, physical activity) and health outcomes (sleep disorders and fatigue, obesity, musculoskeletal disorders). In turn, ill health and chronic conditions can affect performance at work, increasing risk for injury, absenteeism, and reduced productivity. In the past few decades, programs that expand the traditional focus of occupational safety and health to consider non-traditional work-related sources of health and well-being have been shown to be more effective than programs that address these issues separately. This Total Worker Health approach has been recognized by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health as a method for protecting the safety and health of workers, while also advancing the overall well-being of these workers by addressing the conditions of work. This Special Issue is devoted to research “Advancing Worker Health and Safety” in the sense of Total Worker Health®. We welcome the submission of manuscripts presenting original basic and/or applied research relevant to program, policies or practices advancing holistic approaches to worker well-being. Themes may include, but are not limited to, the organization and design of the healthy physical and social work environments, innovative strategies for improving worker well-being, novel methods for exposing underlying occupational causes of chronic disease. The keywords listed below, as well as the issues identified in the text above, suggest some of the many relevant topics.

Dr. Diane Rohlman
Dr. Kevin M. Kelly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Work design
  • Workforce demographics
  • Work organization
  • Work stress
  • Globalization
  • Safety and stress
  • Precarious work
  • Work-life continuum
  • Human factors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle It Doesn’t End There: Workplace Bullying, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Employee Well-Being in Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1548; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071548
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 22 July 2018
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Abstract
Workplace bullying entails negative consequences on workers’ life. Yet, there is lack of research on workplace bullying in an Asian context. Moreover, less is known about the potential mechanisms linking workplace bullying and employee well-being. This study examined the associations between workplace bullying
[...] Read more.
Workplace bullying entails negative consequences on workers’ life. Yet, there is lack of research on workplace bullying in an Asian context. Moreover, less is known about the potential mechanisms linking workplace bullying and employee well-being. This study examined the associations between workplace bullying and Korean employees’ well-being (quality of life, occupational health) and whether the associations were mediated by work-to-family conflict. Cross-sectional data came from 307 workers in South Korea who were employed in healthcare, education, and banking industries. Analyses adjusted for industry, age, gender, education, marital status, and work hours. Employees who had more exposure to workplace bullying reported lower levels of quality of life and occupational health. These associations were mediated by work-to-family conflict, such that more exposure to workplace bullying was associated with greater work-to-family conflict, which, in turn, was associated with lower levels of quality of life and occupational health. These mediating pathways were consistent across the three industries. Korean employees who experience more workplace bullying may bring unfinished work stress to the home (thus greater work-to-family conflict), which impairs their well-being. Future research may need to consider the role of work-to-family conflict when targeting to reduce the negative consequences of workplace bullying. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Total Worker Health to Advance Worker Health and Safety)
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