Special Issue "Genealogy and Multiracial Family Histories"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. G. Reginald Daniel

Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Interests: race and multiraciality, comparative race and culture, sociological theories of race
Assistant Editor
Ms. Jasmine Kelekay

Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Interests: race, ethnicity and nation; racialization and criminalization; Black and African diasporic resistance to racial oppresion; immigration
Assistant Editor
Mr. Joseph Loe-Sterphone

Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Interests: race, ethnicity and nation; whiteness; immigration; conversation analysis
Assistant Editor
Ms. Alyssa Newman

Department of Sociology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Interests: race and multiraciality; reproduction; science and technology studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy invites essays on the topic, “Genealogy and Multiracial Family Histories.” Manuscripts may focus on families with spouses of different designated racial groups who may also have children who are understood to be multiracial as well as multigenerational mixed-race families that celebrate the multiraciality in their genealogy. The common denominator would be to explore how families with multiracial (or mixed-race) members (whether parents, siblings, or both/all) narrate their family histories (with a special focus on how they frame/reframe the salience of race and ethnicity in the process). The editorial team hopes to provide a wide spectrum with regard to discipline or sub-discipline and invites contributions that strengthen and broaden the framework for genealogy studies. Some potential areas of focus may include the following, although other submissions are welcome and encouraged:

  • Role of race and multiraciality family narratives about origin, place, and ties to homeland
  • Roots and racial discovery as it relates to genealogical findings relating to race
  • Tri-racial isolates and mixed race/multiracial settlements and communities
  • Family origin confirmation
  • Impact of family genealogy on identity and culture
  • Genealogy and connection to place and historical moments
  • Narratives/discoveries of racial passing
  • Writing/rewriting family histories, reframing memory and oral history
  • Race, gender, class, and power in multiracial family histories
  • Racial categorization, multiraciality, and using census data in genealogical searches
  • Racialized migration histories/patterns and racial mixing
  • The role of hypodescent in racialized family narratives and preserving racial identities
  • The role of cultural practices in preserving racial identities and family narratives
  • The impact of differences in racialized physical expression/embodiment within multiracial/interracial families on family dynamics
  • How families that use genealogy to construct racial narratives and identities navigate issues around biology and race
  • How members of multiracial/interracial families frame interracial intimacy and relationships
Dr. G. Reginald Daniel
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Multiracial
  • Biracial
  • Mixed race
  • Mixed Race Studies
  • Interracial marriage
  • genealogy studies
  • identity
  • narrative
  • family history

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle How the Use by Eugenicists of Family Trees and Other Genealogical Technologies Informed and Reflected Discourses on Race and Race Crossing during the Era of Moral Condemnation: Mixed-Race in 1920s and 1930s Britain
Received: 4 June 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 30 June 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
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Abstract
In the 1920s and 30s, significant empirical studies were undertaken on mixed-race (‘hybrid’) populations in Britain’s seaport communities. The physical anthropologists Rachel Fleming and Kenneth Little drew on the methods of anthropometry, while social scientist Muriel Fletcher’s morally condemnatory tract belongs to the
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In the 1920s and 30s, significant empirical studies were undertaken on mixed-race (‘hybrid’) populations in Britain’s seaport communities. The physical anthropologists Rachel Fleming and Kenneth Little drew on the methods of anthropometry, while social scientist Muriel Fletcher’s morally condemnatory tract belongs to the genre of racial hygiene. Whether through professional relationships, the conduct of their work, or means of disseminating their findings, they all aligned themselves with the eugenics movement and all made use of pedigree charts or other genealogical tools for tracing ancestry and investigating the inheritance of traits. These variously depicted family members’ races, sometimes fractionated, biological events, and social circumstances which were not part of genealogy’s traditional family tree lexicon. These design features informed and reflected prevailing conceptualisations of race as genetic and biological difference, skin colour as a visible marker, and cultural characteristics as immutable and hereditable. It is clear, however, that Fleming and Little did not subscribe to contemporary views that population mixing produced adverse biological consequences. Indeed, Fleming actively defended such marriages, and both avoided simplistic, ill-informed judgements about human heredity. Following the devastating consequences of Nazi racial doctrines, anthropologists and biologists largely supported the 1951 UNESCO view that there was no evidence of disadvantageous effects produced by ‘race crossing’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogy and Multiracial Family Histories)
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