Special Issue "Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mazeyar Parvinzadeh Gashti

PRE Labs Inc., Kelowna, BC V1V 2X8, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: synthesis of crystals by gel diffusion; evaluation of biopolymer gels in crystals by microscopic techniques; UV induced gel formation; composite crystals for biological applications and drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, we know that nanotechnology has been considered extensively in fiber and textile engineering in order to perform new functionalities. Ultrafine nanoparticles can transfer their intrinsic properties to fibers and textiles by surface coatings. Although several research studies confirmed such functionalities, research is still in progress in laboratories around the world to establish further results. Smart coatings can also be performed on textile products through other methods, such as plasma and laser coatings, sol-gel techniques, magnetron sputter coating, layer-by-layer techniques and crosslinking using polymers. Several properties are demonstrated using these methods, such as antibacterial, superhydrophobic, fire retardant, self–cleaning, superhydrophilic, moth-proofing, electromagnetic shielding, and electrical conductivity.

In this Special Issue, original research papers, as well as reviews, are welcome. The goal is to gather contributions on various aspects related to smart coatings, including preparation, analyses, industrial uses, as well as their potential toxicity to humans during their usage.

I hope that this Special Issue will provide the scientific community with a thorough overview of the current research on smart fibers and textiles.

Dr. Mazeyar Parvinzadeh Gashti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surface grafting
  • plasma and laser
  • nanocomposites
  • layer-by-layer
  • sputter coating
  • functionality
  • toxicity.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Fluoropolymer-Wrapped Conductive Threads for Textile Touch Sensors Operating via the Triboelectric Effect
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020041
Received: 3 May 2018 / Revised: 2 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
PDF Full-text (2187 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Touch-sensitive electrical arrays are the primary user interface for modern consumer electronics. Most contemporary touch sensors, including known iterations of textile-based touch sensors, function by detecting capacitive changes within a circuit resulting from direct skin contact. However, this method of operation fails when
[...] Read more.
Touch-sensitive electrical arrays are the primary user interface for modern consumer electronics. Most contemporary touch sensors, including known iterations of textile-based touch sensors, function by detecting capacitive changes within a circuit resulting from direct skin contact. However, this method of operation fails when the user’s skin or the surface of the touch sensor is dirty, oily or wet, preventing practical use of textile-based touch sensors in real-world scenarios. Here, an electrically touch-responsive woven textile is described, which is composed of fluoropolymer-wrapped conductive threads. The fluoropolymer wrapping prevents contaminant buildup on the textile surface and also electrically insulates the conductive thread core. The woven textile touch sensor operates via surface potential changes created upon skin contact. This method of operation, called the triboelectric effect, has not been widely used to create textile touch sensors, to date. The influences of surface wetness and varying skin surface chemistry are studied, and the triboelectric textile touch sensors are found to be advantageously insensitive to these environmental variables, indicating that triboelectric textiles have promise for practical use as touch interfaces in furniture and interior design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Coatings on Fibers and Textiles)
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