Special Issue "Dietary Fiber and Human Health"

A special issue of Fibers (ISSN 2079-6439).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assist. Prof. Dr. Dayeon Shin

Department of Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, Syracuse University, 552 White Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nutritional epidemiology; maternal nutritional status and birth outcomes; dietary patterns and chronic diseases; biomarkers and predictors for nutritional status in large-scale populations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary fiber consists of non-digestible carbohydrate and lignin that are intrinsic and intact in plants as defined by the Institute of Medicine. The current evidence base highlights the importance of dietary fiber in order to reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes such as some cancers, cardiovascular diseases, obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, findings on the role of dietary fiber in human health and disease are scattered and unclear. The current Special Issue aims to bring together recent reviews and cutting-edge original papers in the field to address current gaps in the evidence base on the role of dietary fiber in human health.

Assist. Prof. Dr. Dayeon Shin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fibers is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary fiber
  • Human Health
  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Cancer

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessCommentary Does Dietary Fiber Reduce the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis?
Fibers 2018, 6(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/fib6020018
Received: 22 February 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 27 March 2018
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Abstract
Accumulating evidence has suggested the effects of a higher dietary fiber intake on weight loss and reduced inflammation. In line with this, recent observations presented higher consumption of dietary fiber in relation to the lower risks of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and worsening knee
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Accumulating evidence has suggested the effects of a higher dietary fiber intake on weight loss and reduced inflammation. In line with this, recent observations presented higher consumption of dietary fiber in relation to the lower risks of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and worsening knee pain. Because both obesity and inflammation are commonly linked with knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and preliminary results have suggested a role of microbiome in both joint disorders, we hypothesized that increased dietary fiber intakes might confer benefits in reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and/or delaying disease progression. In this commentary, we sought to provide rationales regarding fiber’s physiological characteristics and its influence in the gut microbiome to postulate a potential link between fiber intake and the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. Verification of these hypotheses requires data from observational and experimental studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Fiber and Human Health)
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